North and Central America

Taxonomy

Code

1000001 Map of North and Central America

Scope note(s)

  • Within the logic of TGN,

Source note(s)

  • Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Equivalent terms

North and Central America

  • UF North America
  • UF Central America

Associated terms

North and Central America

4950 Archival description results for North and Central America

4 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Ansco Clipper

Item is an Ansco Clipper 4.5 x 6 xm rollfilm camera. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with a black body and expandable lens board.

Kodak Duaflex camera

Item consists of a Kodak Duaflex camera. It is black and silver with a Kodar f8/72mm lens. Tripod mount. Made in Canada. 620 roll film pseudo twin-lens reflex. Flash-holder imported by the Canadian Kodak Co. Ltd. Toronto, for use with early Duaflex models I and II.

Brownie Target Six-16

Item consists of a Brownie Target Six-16 box roll film camera that used film sized 616 to make pictures sized 6.35 x 10.8 cm. It was made in Canada, and has a simple meniscus lens and a rotary shutter. The body is a metal box covered in black leatherette with two brilliant finders, and a vertical art-deco line design on the front panel.

Kodak Duaflex III camera

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 620 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder. Camera has a fixed focus Kodet lens.

Detective camera

Item is a wooden, leather-covered Waterbury Improved Detective Camera. The design is a simple box format with film holders accessed through a door at the rear, and shutter assembly inside the front of box. On the inside of the plate holder door, a sticker reads "Caution, This film must be developed before Jan. 1st, 1900."

Kodak Disc 3100

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap.

Kodak Pocket Instamatic 40 camera outfit

Small hand held camera with thin, horizontal design. Black plastic casing with metal plate and blue release button on top. Black leatherette on bottom. Strap attached. Slide pulls shut to cover recessed flashbulb.

Allied Mini camera

Item is a roll of film in plastic casing, designed to be used as a camera. The camera comes in its original packaging, opened. ASA 100.

Univex model A

Item is a small, Bakelite camera with a frame viewfinder. This was a proprietary camera design, which used No.00, 6 exposure film only made by the Universal Camera Corporation. Norton Camera filed a patent lawsuit filed against the Universal company after the product was released. Norton had been in talks with Universal to produce the camera originally. Universal eventually won the case and purchased the Norton Camera company. The camera originally sold for 39 cents.

Kodak disc 6100 camera outfit

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. This item includes the original packaging, with unopened twin pack of Disc film and strap.

Kodak Instamatic X-15F

Item is an instamatic camera for exposures on 126 cartridge film. This Canadian model had both French and English notations. The original X-15 used Magicubes for flash photos. The F designation is for the updated model, which uses "Flipflash".

Falcon Miniature

Item consists of a Falcon Miniature made in New York by Utility Manufacturing Company. It is a 127 film camera with a half frame viewfinder and a black Bakelite body. It has a Wollensak Minivar 50mm lens with fixed aperture and fixed focus, a one speed (1/25 +B) rotary shutter, a simple optical viewfinder and a spare film compartment.

Kodak Ektralite 500

Item consists of a Kodak Ektralite 500 camera. It is a 110 cartridge compact viewfinder camera with automatic flash. Black body with hinged cover that can be used as camera grip. Features a Kodak Reomar 22mm lens. Uses 9-volt alkaline battery.

Kodak Instamatic X-15F

Item is an Instamatic X-15F camera outfit for exposures on 126 cartridge film. This Canadian model had both French and English notations. The original X-15 used Magicubes for flash photos. The F designation is for the updated model, which uses "Fliflash". Outfit includes wristband and manual.

Kodak Tele-Instamatic 608

Item is a compact Instamatic camera for 13 x 17mm negatives with 110 film cartridges. Features a 25mm (normal setting) and 43mm (tele setting), f11 lumized lens and flash attachment. Shutter speeds of 1/125 for dayli1/45 for flash. Original sales price, $35.95.

Kodak Pocket Instamatic 60 Camera

Item is an Instamatic film camera for 13 x 17mm negatives with 110 film cartridges. Features a 26mm, f2.7 Ektar lens and magicube flash shoe. Shutter is an electronic leaf with speeds of 10 seconds to 1/250. This model has a silver body. Original sales price, $28.00.

Kodak Disc 8000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap. In plastic display original packaging. Uses HR disc.

Minute 16

Item consists of a 16mm subminiature camera designed to resmble a cine camera. It has a f6.3 meniscus lens and guillotine shutter with a speed of 1/60 seconds. The camera has an aperture scale from f6.3 to 16, a manually reset frame-counter, and a two-piece sports finder. There is also a tripod socket that doubles as flash synch-contact.

Graflex speed graphic

Item was the official US press photographer's camera. It has a focal plane shutter as well as a front shutter. The lens is Wollensaku 135mm F/4.7 Raptar. The camera has a metal drop bed with two focus knobs. On top is a telescoping sports-finder. This model is a 4 x 5 format.

McKoewn pg. 369

Fiarchild Aerial Camera

Item is a typical handheld camera using 5.7 inch roll film. The transport is by a built-in clockwork (one shot at a time) to be wound by a large lever at the left of the body to generate a flat film plane. Some suction is generated during exposure. Shutter is made by Ilex (Rochester NY) 1/125, 1/250, 1/500 sec.The lens is also by Ilex Optical Co - Paragon Anasigmat f6.3. Accessories include 1 38mm Yellow Filter and 2 Metal Slides.

Stereo Realist 1042

Item is a stereo camera produced in the early 1950's when the format became widely popular with amateur photographers. The camera uses 35mm film, has 2 anastigmat lenses, 3.5/35mm with a shutter speed of 1-1/150. The camera has a flash synch on the top.

Nimslo 3D

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera developed by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo and manufactured in the UK. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, coupled with a shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, 35mm film was sent to the Nimslo Co. in England and a few other specialty labs. The customer received developed, autostereo (lenticular) colour prints, which allow a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Auto Graflex

Item consists of a single lens reflex Auto Graflex camera for 3.25 x 4.25" plates or film sheets. It has a disappearing Bausch & Lomb 166mm f/4.5 lens, a collapsible viewing hood and a cloth curtain New Simplified Focal Plane Shutter with speeds up to 1/1000 sec. It was made by the Folmer & Schwing Division of the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York from 1907-1923. Two other models of the same camera were made and sold at the same time, one for 4x5" plates and one for 5x7" plates.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Argoflex E

Item consists of an Argus Argoflex E twin-lens reflex camera made in the U.S.A. It was the first 620 film TLR camera produced by Argus. The camera features gear-coupled lenses allowing the user to focus using the viewfinder, an f4.5/75mm Argus Varex Anastigmat lens, and an Argus Varex Shutter with speeds T, B, 200, 100, 50, 25 and 10. Exposures are 6x6. The body is made of black Bakelite.

Sony AV-3400 Portapack system

Item is a portable video recorder system including a portable video-capture camera, 1 inch reel to reel video recorder and player, and monitor. Power is supplied by AC power adapters for use with standard outlets and a rechargeable battery pack that provided 45 minutes of camera operation. The camera recorded black and white signals and was originally sold from $1,400.00-$1,650.00.

Ciné-Kodak Model K

Item is a 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur use. IT has Camera has an anastigmat 25mm /f1.0 focusing lens with an aperture scale from f1.9 to 16. Camera has an aluminium alloy body and black leather covering. The Model K was an enlarged version of the Model BB to fit either 50- or 100-foot rolls. The camera has a spring driven motor with a winding crank, a tripod socket, exposure guide on the front of the camera, and a footage indicator.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item is a hand-held motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 8mm film. Includes a 13mm f/2.:3 Kodak Ektanar Lens with aperture selector wheel.

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Kodak XL330

Item consists of a Kodak XL 330. It is a silent super 8 motion picture camera with a Kodak Ektar f/1.2 9mm lens and fixed focus. It has an adjustable eyepiece, a filming speed of 18 frames per second, a film counter, a battery check button and a tripod socket. It works with 4 AA batteries.

Kodak Instamatic M4

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M4. It is a super 8 film cartridge camera that was released at the same time as the Instamatic M2, and M6, as well as the projectors Instamatic M50, M70, M80, M90 and M100 when Kodak first launched the Super 8 mm film format. Super 8mm film was the same as standard 8mm film, but was loaded into a plastic cartridge that could contain 50 feet of film. The image area of Super 8 film was 50% larger than standard 8mm because of a new design of picture vs. sprocket hole, and the cartridge format allowed for movie cameras to become easy enough for anyone to use.

Kodak Instamatic M26

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M26. It is a motion picture camera that uses a silent super 8 film cartridge and has a Kodak Ektanar 13mm f/1.8 lens. It has a 28.5mm filter, fixed focus, an under-exposure warning signal that shows in the viewfinder, auto exposure control, 18 frames per second film speed, and a cable release socket. It is the same as the Kodak Instamatic M24, but features a different lens.

Kodak Instamatic M2

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M2 super 8 film motion picture camera. It was one of the first Instamatic movie cameras and was released the same year that Kodak launched the super 8 format and cartridge-loading Kodachrome II Film. The Instamatic M2 had a fixed movie speed of 18 exposures per second, featured a Kodak Ektanar lens with f-stops 2.2 to 23 and was made of grey and black plastic and metal parts. On the battery slot cover, Kodak added five illustrations of how to choose the correct aperture based on the weather for Kodachrome II film.

Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera that uses double 8mm film and has a lens turret featuring a Kodak Normal Ektanar 13mm f/1.9 lens, a Kodak Wide Angle Ektanar 6.5mm f/1.9 lens, and a Kodak Telephoto Ektanar 24mm f/1.9 lens.

Kodak Instamatic M14

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M14 compact motion picture camera. It was used with silent Super 8 film cartridges and has a 14mm f/2.7 Kodak Ektanar Lens. There is the option to attach a pistol grip for easier hand-held filming.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak Cine Camera Scopemeter Turret f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Camera Scopemeter Turret f/1.9. Most models would feature a 6.5mm, a 13mm, and a 24mm rotating turret lens. It originally retailed for $59.50. A switch on the front of the camera allows the user to choose between Type A Filter, No Filter, or a Skylight Filter.

Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3. It is an 8mm wind-up spool-film camera. It has a flip-up bombsite viewfinder, an f/2.3 lens with a photocell, and originally retailed for $74.50.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Kodak Instamatic M9

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M9 movie camera. It is an 8mm camera with an attached folding pistol grip. The body is brown and made of metal and plastic. It has a f/1.8 9.5-45mm Kodak Zoom Lens.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Model II

Item consists of a Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Camera Model II. It has a Kodak Zoom Ektanar Lens f/1.6 and used 8mm film. It was released the same year as the previous model, in 1960.

Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Model I

Item consists of a Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Camera Automatic. It is a motion picture camera that shot 25 ft reels of silent Regular 8mm film at 16 frames per second. It used a clockwork motor that required winding about every 40 seconds. It allowed for about 2 minutes of filming before the reel would need to be flipped so that the other side of the film could be exposed. When released in 1960, the Zoom 8 Reflex retailed for $190.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera. The camera was patented by Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, and was made by Canadian Kodak Co. Limited. It has a Kodak Ektanar Lens 13m f/2.3 and is made of plastic. It used 8mm film and was sold for 19.99 when released in 1963.

Bell & Howell 240 Electric Eye camera outfit

Item consists of a Bell & Howell 240 motion picture camera. It is in a hard leather case also containing the manual and the case key. The camera uses 16mm film, has automatic exposure control, a 20mm lens, a self threading mechanism, has 32-fott film run and rapid winding crank, a reserve power indicator, and accepts a cable release.

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Keystone 16mm Film movie camera, model 7

Item consists of a 16mm motion picture camera, Model 7 made by Keystone Manufacturing Company in Boston Massachusetts in 1937. The company was an American manufacturer known for movie cameras with built-in electronic flash in the 1930s. The camera features a summer exposure guide on the front and has a Switar 1:1.8 f=16mm lens.

Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3 with electric-eye control. It is in it's original packaging with the manual. It comes with a built-in exposure meter and was made to use 50 foot rolls of 13mm Kodachrome Color Movie Film. It has a 13mm standard built-in lens. Can be used with converter lenses or various filters.

Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera. It was manufactured from 1961 to 1967. It is an 8mm camera with a P. Angenieux Paris f.6.5-52mm 1:1.8 Angenieux-Zoom lens with original lens cap. It used a clockwork motor and shot 25 feet rolls of 8mm film at 16 frames per second. Some paint is beginning to peel. When the camera was first released it cost approximately $139.95, about $900 today.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Cine Kodak K 100

Item is a range-finder, 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur, home use. The spring wound moter will shoot 40 feet of film before needing to be rewound.

Cine-Kodak B

This is a 16mm movie camera that used 100 foot spools of film. The body is leather covered metal, rounded edges. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 25mm fixed-focus lens. Spring motor, brilliant reflex viewfinder. Working condition.

McKoewn pg. 1075

Brownie Movie Camera Turret f/1.9

Item is a double run 8mm motion picture camera for amateur, home use. The camera has 3 lenses mounted on a rotating turret: 9mm, 13mm, and 24mm. Double run cameras were used with 8mm film, run through the camera twice, exposing one side of the film and then the other. The film is cut after processing and spliced together.

Bell & Howell Electric Eye

Item is a Bell & Howell Electric Eye 8mm motion-picture camera with a 3 lens turret. Bell & Howell was a U.S. based manufacturer of motion picture technology.

Marianne Ahrne interview

File contains recorded and transcribed copies of an interview conducted with Swedish film director Marianne Ahrne and Toronto Psychiatrist Dr. Frank Sommers, for Sommers' project "The Mind of the Film Director. Also included are 2 letters from Marianne Ahrne to Frank Sommers, including photographic stills from her films, promotional publications for the 1976 film Near and Far Away and the 1976 film Roots of Grief, and news clippings from the Globe and Mail related to Ahrne's films.

Sommers, Frank

Claude Jutra interview

File contains a transcribed and audio copy of an interview conducted with French Canadian actor and film director Claude Jutra by Toronto Psychiatrist Dr. Frank Sommers, for Sommers' project "The Mind of the Film Director.

Sommers, Frank

Bert Haanstra interview

File contains a short, transcribed, copy of an interview conducted with Dutch film director Bert Haanstra by Toronto Psychiatrist Dr. Frank Sommers, for Sommers' project "The Mind of the Film Director. Also included are a filmography and list of Haanstra's awards, photographic stills from Haanstra's films, and a one page description of Dr. Sommers' book project.

Sommers, Frank

Architects' Description of Maple Leaf Gardens manuscript

The manuscript lists the officers of Maples Leaf Gardens Limited, the directors of the Maple Leaf Hockey Club Limited, and the sub-contractors engaged in The Gardens' construction. It provides a basic description of the building's construction and features, the method ice making, and other included facilities. The manuscript mentions the unique method wage payment for the unionized site workmen being partially by stock "in the venture".

The typeface on the four manuscript pages is faint while the envelope has darker typeface. This could be due to a new ribbon having been inserted into the typewriter. Page four has a handwritten notation and is a carbon copy of its original, perhaps included in error.

The Toronto Maple Leaf Hockey Club, Ltd.

Maple Leaf Gardens stock prospectus

Entitled, "Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto's New Sports Centre," the document offers information relevant to the sale of $700,000 in stocks, including the price per share, land and building information, other attractions besides hockey to be billeted, expected earnings, etc.

Maple Leaf Gardens, Limited

Canadian Red Ensign miniature flag

The miniature flag is a representation of the Canadian flag at the time capsule was installed. It is the British red ensign which features the Union Jack in the upper corner (the canton), while the shield of the coat of arms of Canada made it distinctly Canadian.

City of Toronto Municipal Handbook

This handbook is a reference book with historical, political, judicial, and general information on the City. Briefly, it includes a list of Toronto mayors from the first in 1834, William Lyon Mackenzie to William Stewart in 1931 ; photographs of the City's executive ; City department budgets ; election results ; fire department stations ; business license fees ; tariffs for taxicabs and livery cabs ; motor vehicle information ; statistics and general information, and much more.

J.W. Somers, City Clerk, signed his name across the tile page.

City of Toronto

Ontario Hockey Association rules book, 1930 - 1931

The OHA rule book does not have a table of contents or index; however, its contents include :

  • Lists of past and current officers from 1890 - 1930
  • List of championship teams for all three series - Senior, Intermediate, and Junior; the earliest being 1891
  • Lists of 1930-1931 Secretaries and Referees
  • Images of past presidents and other officers
  • An extensive review of the past 1929-1930 season, including game winners and team players
  • President's Address : OHA President Richard Butler's 41st annual meeting speech at the Royal York Hotel, November 1930
  • The Constitution of the Ontario Hockey Association and regulations and rules of competition and of the game
  • Images of trophies
  • Samples of forms
  • Schedule of games for the three Series, 1930-1931 season, including intercollegiate games in the Seniors Series.

Ontario Hockey Association

Love Camera

Item is a black, disposable point-and-shoot camera intended for amateur photographers. It also comes with instructions on how to get your particular brand of film developed and an envelope to mail it in. The Love camera was first developed in 1973 by a Canadian company that originally called it the "Lure", selling it under the name "Love" in the United States. The camera was sold to the Brazilian manufacturer Sonora Industrial in 1981. While the company made a few improvements, the basic design remained simple.

Portrait of L. Carey

Item is a cabinet card photograph of a young woman with blue collar overpainted, affixed to yellow cardstock. On verso, in black letterpress, centred: "L. ROBIRA,/ Late with Theo. LILIENTHAL./ Photographer,/ 245 ROYAL STREET,/ NEW ORLEANS./ Duplicates may be had at any time." In purple pen, handwritten above: "L. Carey/ April 25, 1886". And at top left corner, handwritten in pencil, "400".

L. Robira, Photographer

Portrait of boy and girl in outdoor scene

Item is a cream cabinet card with gold letterpress at bottom, "Thom Winnipeg." Photograph shows two children in front of a painted backdrop, depicting a lake and trees. The boy holds a straw hat and the girl is seated on a wooden chair made of twigs. Another straw hat leans against the chair.

Thom

Portrait of a man in fur coat

Item is a cream cabinet card with gold letterpress at bottom centre, "H.C. TAIT./ PHOTOGRAPHS, FANCY GOODS." Photograph shows an old man with long beard in fur coat, seated in an interior, slightly blurred setting. He holds a paper that reads, upside-down, "THE/ -OGRAPH/-/[illegible]".

H.C. Tait Photographs

Portrait of woman, vignetted

Item is a vignetted photograph, portrait of an old woman in black dress, in oval matt with black letterpress at bottom right, "M.M. Morton/ LINDSAY, ONT." Mat is enclosed in a bi-fold grey card with embossed drawing of sun with face on the right side.

M.M. Morton

Portrait of a female graduate

Item is a dark brown card with gold letterpress at bottom centre, "J. FRASER BRYCE/ 107 KING STREET WEST, TORONTO". Picture is 3/4 view of a woman in cap and gown, holding a book in her left hand, with a white fur hood draped across her shoulders, possibly indicating an undergraduate degree obtained. A sticker on the verso reads "$1.00/ D".

J. Fraser Bryce

Portrait of two young men in suits

Item consists of a brownish green card with small oval photograph pasted on. Image is of two young men in pinstriped suits, also shown in 2008.001.112. Embossed at lower right of card, in black, "Studebaker/ 142 N. MAIN ST./ WICHITA." On verso, handwritten in pencil, sideways, "MARY A Ydene".

Studebaker

Portrait of a young man with large tie

Item is a white cabinet card with elaborately embossed border and text, at bottom "Goff" followed by symbol with the letters F, G, and L intertwined, and "WAUSAU, WIS." On verso, in black letterpress, "These cards are manufactured expressly for/ F. Lee Goff, Wausau, Wis. U.S.A./ by Carl Ernst & Co. Berlin, Germany." Image is of a young man in a tweed suit with an elaborate paisley tie.

Goff

Portrait of a girl in tartan

Item is a portrait of a little girl in tartan skirt and sash, with black coat and black hat (traditional highland dress?). Photograph is mounted on grey card stock with embossed border and text at bottom in bronze letterpress, "J. Walker/ FERGUS, ONT." On verso, in pencil, "2.00".

J. Walker

Portrait of three children with toys

Item is a pink cabinet card with red backing. In gold letterpress at bottom, "Peppiatt FERGUS." Image is of three children with toys. The youngest is seated in the centre holding a doll in her lap. On the left, a child in striped dress sits on a rocking horse, and to the right, a boy stands holding the reins to a wooden horse head lying on the floor. On verso, in pencil, "1.00".

Peppiatt

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