<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

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300149146

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  • (<image-making processes and techniques>, <processes and techniques by specific type>, Processes and Techniques (hierarchy name))

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  • Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus

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<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

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<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

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<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

281 Archival description results for <photography and photographic processes and techniques>

the Handle

Item is a large sized instant camera in a grey, blue and black plastic housing with a large handle on the left hand side for easy handling. It is an example of one of Kodak's short attempt at instant film, prior to the loss of a patent infringement case with Polaroid in which Kodak was ordered to cease production of any instant film related products.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

The discovery of x-rays

A copy of the x-ray radiographic image of Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen's wife's hand, taken in 1895, and reproduced in 1970 to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the discovery of x-ray imaging. The copy was made on Kodak RP/D X-OMAT Radiograph Duplicating Film. A piece of paper accompanying the image gives details of its creation.

Eastman Kodak Company

Making the invisible visible [information flyer]

X-ray radiograph images republished on an information flyer with a brief description of the materials being reproduced. Photographs of the Dead Sea scrolls were taken using Kodak Infrared Film, and were provided by the Palestine Archeological Museum of Jerusalem for reproduction in the flyer.

Eastman Kodak Company

Looking through gold [information flyer]

X-ray radiograph image republished on an information flyer with a brief description of the material being reproduced. A photograph of the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamon was provided by the Laboratories of the Louvre Museum for reproduction in the flyer.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak instant products

Item is a 3-ring binder containing information on Kodak instant photography products. Includes press releases, diagrams, photographs, and general instructions. Binder is divided into the following sections: a slide presentation; Kodak instant camera production; Kodak instant film production; how the cameras work; how the film works; research and development; and the chemistry. Three promotional brochures for Kodak cameras, Kodak photographic film, and Kodak Park are laid into front.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Visions of the Deep: the underwater world of Al Giddings

A documentary both about the process of underwater photography and cinematography and the amazing types of aquatic life that have been captured by Al Gidding's, his cameras and his team. The film elaborates on the process and challenges that arise with capturing images underwater while showing us beautiful imagery. Included are segments on diving under the North Pole, swimming with and feeding sharks, deep diving and diving in tropical climates.

Al Giddings; Images Unlimited Inc.

Len Didur - employee series

The sub-series contains 4 printed works on space photography and x-ray radiography produced by Eastman Kodak Company and either re-produced or re-distributed by Canadian Kodak Company Limited. One example of an x-ray photograph is included in this sub-series.

Didur, Len

In-camera processing (instant) cameras

Series consists of cameras that combine exposure and development in one step to create photographs instantaneously.
While Polaroid is by far the most well known of these cameras, the first patent for instant photography was for the Dubroni, a French wet plate camera, designed so that the glass plate could be sensitized and developed by pouring the chemicals over the plate through a tube in the camera. Later cameras were developed so small tintypes (1895) and direct paper positives (1913) could be made quickly for tourists on busy streets.
But it was the Polaroid Corporation that made instant photography a household item, beginning in 1937 when Edwin Land's young daughter's desire to see her photograph immediately, inspired him to develop the Polaroid's first instant camera: the Land Camera.

The Heritage Collection also contains Kodak Instant Cameras; produced in the late 1970's, they spawned a patent infringement lawsuit from the Polaroid corporation that resulted in the recall all of instant Kodak models sold and the discontinuation of their production.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Source: <a href="http://www.shutterbug.com/content/it%E2%80%99s-instant%E2%80%94-it%E2%80%99s-not-polaroid-pre-and-post-polaroids-1864-1976">Wade, John. "It's Instant - But It's Not Polaroid: Pre- And-PostPolaroids, From 1864 to 1976." Shutterbug : Published May 1, 2012.</a>

Kodak Pleaser

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant camera with a 100mm f/12.7 lens, a shutter with speeds of 1/15-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type PR 10 (PR144) for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Land Model 104 outfit case

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 104 outfit case. It is in a black hard leather case lined with red curduroy also containing the Polaroid flash model 268, 2 packs of Polaroid print mounts and 3 Polaroid envelopes for ordering prints, enlargements, and accessories. The camera is a folding bellows instand camera with automatic exposure that used 100-series Packfilm. It has a 2 element plastic lens and a non-folding zone focusing system. It retailed for $60 when it was first released.

Polaroid Corporation

Pleaser II Kodamatic

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant 'handle' camera with a 100mm f/12.8 lens, a shutter with speeds of 2-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type HS144 for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak. It is the second of the Pleaser models and has a two-tone brown plastic body.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Highlander, model 80A

Item is a Polaroid Highlander Land Camera, model 80A. It is a folding instant camera with a 100mm f8.8 3-element glass lens a 2-speed rotary leaf shutter design with speeds of 1/23s and 1/100s, a Polaroid hot shoe flash, rigid viewfinder, painted steel body, chrome plated trim, exposure set by Polaroid Light Value scale, and a rotating lens front-element for distance focus. It is in a leather case also containing the manual.

Polaroid Corporation

Kodak Colorburst 250

Item is a Kodak Colorburst 250. It is an instant camera with a f/1:12.8 100mm lens, electronic flash, and a 2-1/300 secound shutter with motorized picture output. It used Kodak PR-10 instant film. It was first sold in July 1979.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Spectra System

Polaroid introduced the Spectra at Jordan Marsh in Boston, 1986. It features a different format than the SX-70 or 600 camera: being a bit wider, the cinematic format is able to capture brighter exposures. Many variations of the Spectra followed this first release. The original model includes a 'Quintic' 125mm f/10 3-element plastic lens, self-timer, automatic exposure, sonar autofocus, AF, flash and lighten/darken controls, LCD display, and volume controls; later models had more or fewer controls.

The release of the Spectra camera was accompanied by the release of a correspondingly new Spectra film, called "Image" outside of North America, and sometimes called 1200 film. Spectra film is identical to 600 film - ISO speed, development method and operation remain identical - except if has a different image format: a rectangular 9.2 x 7.3cm rather than 600 film's square format.

Polaroid Swinger Model 20

Item is a white plastic box cameras for instant photographs on Polaroid type 20 film. The inexpensive model includes a telesopic viewfinder, AG-1 flash-bulb socket and flash range scale with red knob.

Polaroid Corporation

Super Colorpack

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Super Colorpack instant film camera. Similar to the Polaroid Super Shooter, the Super Colorpack has a rigid plastic body and a manual finder on the lens and uses peel-apart Land Pack Films.

View-Master

Item is a child's photo viewing system which allowed stereoscopic viewing of a single picture in 3D. A disc with mini slide pictures was inserted, and could be rotated within the viewmaster to change the view.

Kodak Colorburst 300

Item is a snapshot camera for instant photographs using Kodak PR10 instant film. It was originally sold for $75.00 .

This model was part of a series that was Kodak's response to the successful instant cameras produced by Polaroid. A patent infringement case was brought against Kodak by Polaroid in 1977 and was finally settled in 1986, in Polaroid's favour. Kodak recalled all their instant cameras, offering customers a new camera or a rebate in exchange. A further, class action, lawsuit by consumers followed, resulting in Kodak further offering cash or credit for the return of the Kodak nameplate.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Trimprint 940

Item is a Kodak Trimprint 940. It is an instant camera that used film format HS 144-10 and cost $44.95 when released. Anyone who owned this camera was offered a rebate if the camera's nameplate was returned to Kodak, when Kodak lost a case against Polaroid and was forced to withdraw its instant cameras from the market for infringement of Polaroid's patent. Hence, many of this model of camera will be found without the 940 Kodak Trimprint nameplate. It was the successor to the Kodamatic 940.

Eastman Kodak Company

Tri-vision stereoscopic viewer (Haneel)

Item is a black stereoscopic view master manufactured by Haneel Tri-Vision. Viewer is made from plastic and metal. Viewer's eyepieces are adjustable to user's vision when focusing on image. This item is designed to hold one stereographic three-dimensional transparency. Transparency can be inserted through the slot on the top of the viewer. Item comes with square plastic windows used to illuminate backs of transparencies on view.

Written on object : Haneel Tri-Vision Pat'd 2349013

Sawyer's View-Master Stereo Viewer (model C)

Item is a handheld plastic black Model C View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. from the mid-1940's to mid-1950's. This model was the first of its kind to have a slot for reels to be placed in for viewing. The metal lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, the user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. Later Model C editions came with an attachable bulb. The object comes with Royal Canadian Mountain Police sticker.

Written on object : Sawyer's View-Master Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. Can Pat.406893 Other Pat. Pend. U.S. Pat. 2189285. Brit. Pat. 538492. Made in U.S.A. Other Pat. Pend. Portland-Ore.

Kodaslide Stereo Viewer I

Item is a brown handheld electronic stereoscopic viewer manufactured by Kodak. Lenses adjustment and focus are controlled by a small brown knob on the right and switch on the top of eye lenses.
This 3D viewer was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the cardholder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Typically, this object would take transparencies from reels or cards. The light within the object would illuminate the back of the transparency to heighten the experience.

3D stereobox stereoscopic viewer

Item is a green plastic view master with original box packaging. Three-dimensional colour transparency reel depicts frontier puppets. Reels are interchangeable. Reels are inserted into the top of the view master and switched by the plastic push down lever on the side.

Stori viewer stereoscopic viewer

Item is a brown binocular style plastic stereoscopic viewer accompanied by a colour transparency card depicting Llamas from South America. The 3D viewer was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder then viewed through the lens. The binocular effect would cause the two images to overlap and mimic a three-dimensional effect. Written on the card is are llama facts. This card is apart of a Zoo themed series.

Lestrade stereoscopic 3D viewer

Item is a white plastic stereoscopic viewer manufactured by Lestrade in France. Body of the 3D viewer is held together by rivets with a plastic advance lever between the lenses. Item used transparency stereocards. First, cards are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. Viewer can be used with ambient light.

Big Bird 3D camera viewer

Item is a blue plastic camera shaped three-dimensional viewer. The 3D viewer has a built-in reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of Sesame Street characters teaching the alphabet. Unlike traditional View-Masters, this reel cannot be removed. A small Big Bird with his own camera sits on top of the body of the viewer. This object was designed for children's entertainment and education. A orange push down button on the front of the camera is used to switch scenes. Written on the front of the camera is the Sesame Street Logo.

Sawyer's View Master 3D viewer (Model C)

Item is a handheld plastic black Model C View-Master 3D viewer manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. from the mid-1940's to mid-1950's. This model was the first of its kind to have a slot for reels to be placed in for viewing. The metal lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. The light attachment bulb came as a later edition for the View-Master Model C. Attachment was screwed onto viewer with push down red button that switches bulb on and off. Item also comes with 1 reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm black and white transparencies of World War 2 battle scenes.

Written on object : Sawyer's View-Master Reg.US.PAT.OFF. U.S. Pat. 2189.285. Can.PAT.406893 Brit.PAT.538492 Other PAT. PEND. Made in U.S.A. Portland-ORE.

Lestrade stereoscopic 3D viewer

Item is a white plastic stereoscopic viewer manufactured by Lestrade in France. Body of the 3D viewer is held together by rivets with a metal advance lever between the lenses. Item used stereo cards cards with transparencies. Cards are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. Viewer can be used with ambient light. Item comes in original box and with original 1970 catalogue listing all the stereo cards, attachments and other stereoscopic product available through Lestrade.

Meoskon 3D viewer

This item is a bakelite black 3D viewer with a white push down lever designed to switch three-dimensional reels. The object comes in original blue and white box base. Reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, the user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light.

GAF red and white view-master (Model G)

Item is a handheld red and white plastic View-Master containing a promotional reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies sold through GAF. The 3D viewer was manufactured by GAF Corporation in Portland, Oregon, USA. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Item is made of plastic and metal. Reels are interchangeable. In 1939, General Aniline & Film Corporation (GAF) merged with Agfa-Ansco, finally operating under Anitec until 1998. Item comes in original packaging. Written on object : GAF (Canada) Ltd. 70 Alexdon Rd. Drownsview On.

Sawyer's View-Master stereo viewer (model G)

Item is a red plastic Model G View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, the user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. The 3D viewer can be used with ambient light. This item comes with a GAF reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting a kitchen interior designs from ca. 1960. In the mid-1960's Sawyer's was acquired as a subsidiary by GAF. Written on object: made in Belgium T.M.REG. U.S. Pat. Off.- Marque Deposee Belgium Pat.493.128.

Sawyer's View-Master stereo viewer (model G)

Item is a beige plastic Model G View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. The 3D viewer can be used with ambient light. This item comes with a GAF reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting a scene from A.B.C. show S.W.A.T. In the mid-1960's Sawyer's was acquired as a subsidiary by GAF. Written on the object: made in U.S.A. GAF Corporation Portland, Oregon T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.-Marca Reg.- Marque Deposee Belgium Pat. 493.128.

Sawyer's view-master lighted stereoscopic viewer (Model H)

Item is a circular beige plastic Model H View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. The long advanced lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. In the mid-1960's Sawyer's was acquired as a subsidiary by GAF. Light bar is on the top of the viewer with battery compact on the bottom of the feet. Written on the object : Sawyer's View-Master Lighted Viewer

Stereoscopic view magic 3-D viewer

Item is a over/under print viewer manufactured by Viewmagic to view physical or digital born images as three-dimensional objects. The 3D viewer converts 4 x 6 inch prints, which is a not a suitable format size for stereoscopes, into functioning stereographic images. Prisms in the item direct right eye vision upwards and left eye vision down. By swaying forward and back the two images begin to fuse together to mimic a three-dimensional image. Item comes in original unopned package and instruction manuals. Written on object : View Magic Dimension Press Harvard. MA 10451-0083 Made in U.S.A.

Sawyer's View-Master Stereo Viewer (model C)

Item is a handheld plastic black Model C View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. from the mid-1940's to mid-1950's. This model was the first of its kind to have a slot for reels to be placed in for viewing. The metal lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, the user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. Later Model C editions came with an attachable bulb. The 3D viewer included a Royal Canadian Mountain Police sticker.

Written on object : Sawyer's View-Master Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. Can Pat.406893 Other Pat. Pend. U.S. Pat. 2189285. Brit. Pat. 538492. Made in U.S.A. Other Pat. Pend. Portland-Ore.

View-Master Lighted 3D

Item is a handheld red plastic View-Master. The 3D viewer includes one a reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting promotional themed images of famous popular culture and cartoon characters. Reels for View-Master were sold through Tycho Industries, Inc. Reels were manufactured by Tycho Industries Inc. in Portland, Oregon, USA. Whereas, the View-Master was manufactured in New Jersey, USA. The yellow lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light or by bulb. Bulb is powered by 2 ‘AA’ batteries that are fit into a compartment beneath the viewer. A yellow push down button on the front of the viewer controls bulb. Written on object : View-Master Lighted 3D

Kodak Instant photographs

File contains example images created with Kodak Instant Print Film. Kodak's instant film had an iso of 80, created 10.8x8.3 cm transparencies, and was manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation between and 1997.

Eastman Kodak Company

Assorted Gelatin Silver Prints

Portraits of people by different publishers:
1 print by G. Marr
1 print by Evans & Hastings
1 print by Ea. Ray
1 print by McVey
2 prints by Edy Bros.
1 print by J. J. Schmidt
1 print by the Maitland Studio
1 print by Dixon
1 print by Hadden's Studio
2 prints by Mickelthamite
16 prints by unidentified publishers, one has a swastika on the front cover

Kodak Verichrome Safety Film in store stand up advertisement

Item consists of a stand up, cardboard cut-out poster advertising Kodak Verichorme Safety film, a black and white orthocrhomatic film manufactured between 1931 and 1956. The ad features a woman in a red striped dress holding a Kodak Duaflex II camera (manufactured between 1950 and 1954), a role of Verichrome 120 film, and a pile of black and white photographs, with an image of a man and a boy playing baseball visible.

Kodak Developing and Printing Outfit No. 2

Item consists of a cardboard box containing materials necessary to develop film and print black and white photographs at home. Items include a Kodak candle lamp darkroom light, glass chemical stirrer, glass measuring cup, darkroom thermometer, 3 black enameled printing trays, black enameled adjustable printing frame for 95 x 150 mm (3.75" x 6"), 95 x 95mm (3.75" x 3.75"), and 65 x 95 mm (2.5" x 3.75") prints. The set includes the original yellow Kodak box, and an insturction booklet for the use of the set.

Kodak wooden developing tank

Item consists of a wooden box used for black and white film developing, containing a stainless steel round metal film tank and reel for 120mm film, 2 handles for film winding that fit through holes in the box, 1 film spool, and a metal instrument. A metal spool holder is mounted to the inside of the box. To use the developing tank, the film backing paper is attached to a spindle in the wooden developing tank, along with a light-tight cover, all of which are wound onto the spindle. The spindle is then transferred to the metal developing tank to be processed.

Source: Early Photography (2019). Roll-film developing tanks. Retrieved from: http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk/site/entry_D70-X.html

Sawyer's View-Master Stereo Viewer (model G)

Item is a beige plastic Model G View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. the 3D viewer includes original packaging, a GAF View-Master Stereo Viewer box nearly identical to the Sawyer's version of the viewer. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. This item comes with a promotional reel depicting different reel themes available for purchase through Sawyer's Inc. Reel is made of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies. In the mid-1960's Sawyer's was acquired as a subsidiary by GAF. This may explain why the packaging and object were nearly identical but branded differently.

Tru-Vue viewer box set (Tru-Vue company)

Item is a brown plastic 3D viewer built with a push-down lever between the lenses. The lever is designed to rotate a reel containing three-dimensional black and white 35 mm acetate film manufactured by Tru-Vue Company. Images are inserted through the slot on the left side of the lenses. Item comes with square plastic windows to illuminate backs of transparencies on view. Once the film is circulated, it rewinds itself on the right hand side of the viewer. Item comes in original box with 4 original films depicting Pikes Peak Region and Depth Photography. Item also comes with instructions on how to use the Tru-Vue set and an additional business reply card with more instructions for the camera.

Multi-Vue stereoscopic viewer kit

This item is a promotional stereoscopic kit given out by Chevrolet General Motors photography to display interiors and exteriors of their new car line. Each image is titled with the car name. The 3D viewer is black and made from metal and plastic. The viewer comes with a built-in light that requires C batteries. Stereoscopic cards are placed through the slot in the bottom of the stereoscope, next the image would be viewed through the viewer. Lens can be adjusted by the metal knobs on the side to correct vision. A push-down button on the body of the viewer turns on a small internal light bulb which brightens the stereoscopic transparencies. This makes the image easier to see. Box of kit is made from cardboard and leather with snap buttons to open and close. Slots within the box divide and house viewer and stereographs.

Keystone Ophthalmic Telebinocular Viewer

Item is an Ophthalmic Telebinocular Viewer manufactured by Keystone View Co., for use in optometry for vision testing. To be used with Keystone stereoscopic target slides. Item includes metal box, with two stereoscopic photographs of the Grand Canyon. Engraved on object: "Keystone View Co. Meadville. PA. USA. Patented No.1.703.787"

Fiarchild Aerial Camera

Item is a typical handheld camera using 5.7 inch roll film. The transport is by a built-in clockwork (one shot at a time) to be wound by a large lever at the left of the body to generate a flat film plane. Some suction is generated during exposure. Shutter is made by Ilex (Rochester NY) 1/125, 1/250, 1/500 sec.The lens is also by Ilex Optical Co - Paragon Anasigmat f6.3. Accessories include 1 38mm Yellow Filter and 2 Metal Slides.

Fed CTEPEO stereo camera

Item is a 35mm stereo camera with CdS metering. Manual or automatic exposure. 24 x 29mm images. Industar-81 F2.8/38mm lenses. Comes with leather pouch, sun shades, small parts, and hard plastic case.

Stereo Realist 1042

Item is a stereo camera produced in the early 1950's when the format became widely popular with amateur photographers. The camera uses 35mm film, has 2 anastigmat lenses, 3.5/35mm with a shutter speed of 1-1/150. The camera has a flash synch on the top.

Nimslo 3D

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera developed by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo and manufactured in the UK. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, coupled with a shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, 35mm film was sent to the Nimslo Co. in England and a few other specialty labs. The customer received developed, autostereo (lenticular) colour prints, which allow a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Coronet "3-D"

Item is an inexpensive plastic "3-D" stereo camera made by the Coronet Camera Company. The camera has a binocular viewfinder for 4 stereo pairs or 8 single exposures and uses 127 film for 4.5 x 5 cm exposures, featuring a single speed shutter, 1/50, and a twin f11 meniscus fixed-focus lenses.

Advertising Brochure for Keystone Stereoscopic Viws

The form advertises that stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co. can now be borrowed at the local library and viewed using the stereoscopic viewers they have available. Brochure outlines what they are, the process and contextualizes the cards, stating that they also carry pictures for rural people. Also includes images of people looking at the cards and a couple pictures of people going through the process to borrow stereocards

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