<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

Taxonomy

Code

300149146

Scope note(s)

  • (<image-making processes and techniques>, <processes and techniques by specific type>, Processes and Techniques (hierarchy name))

Source note(s)

  • Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

Equivalent terms

<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

Associated terms

<photography and photographic processes and techniques>

54 Archival description results for <photography and photographic processes and techniques>

the Handle

Item is a large sized instant camera in a grey, blue and black plastic housing with a large handle on the left hand side for easy handling. It is an example of one of Kodak's short attempt at instant film, prior to the loss of a patent infringement case with Polaroid in which Kodak was ordered to cease production of any instant film related products.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak instant products

Item is a 3-ring binder containing information on Kodak instant photography products. Includes press releases, diagrams, photographs, and general instructions. Binder is divided into the following sections: a slide presentation; Kodak instant camera production; Kodak instant film production; how the cameras work; how the film works; research and development; and the chemistry. Three promotional brochures for Kodak cameras, Kodak photographic film, and Kodak Park are laid into front.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Pleaser

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant camera with a 100mm f/12.7 lens, a shutter with speeds of 1/15-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type PR 10 (PR144) for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Land Model 104 outfit case

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 104 outfit case. It is in a black hard leather case lined with red curduroy also containing the Polaroid flash model 268, 2 packs of Polaroid print mounts and 3 Polaroid envelopes for ordering prints, enlargements, and accessories. The camera is a folding bellows instand camera with automatic exposure that used 100-series Packfilm. It has a 2 element plastic lens and a non-folding zone focusing system. It retailed for $60 when it was first released.

Polaroid Corporation

Pleaser II Kodamatic

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant 'handle' camera with a 100mm f/12.8 lens, a shutter with speeds of 2-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type HS144 for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak. It is the second of the Pleaser models and has a two-tone brown plastic body.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Highlander, model 80A

Item is a Polaroid Highlander Land Camera, model 80A. It is a folding instant camera with a 100mm f8.8 3-element glass lens a 2-speed rotary leaf shutter design with speeds of 1/23s and 1/100s, a Polaroid hot shoe flash, rigid viewfinder, painted steel body, chrome plated trim, exposure set by Polaroid Light Value scale, and a rotating lens front-element for distance focus. It is in a leather case also containing the manual.

Polaroid Corporation

Kodak Colorburst 250

Item is a Kodak Colorburst 250. It is an instant camera with a f/1:12.8 100mm lens, electronic flash, and a 2-1/300 secound shutter with motorized picture output. It used Kodak PR-10 instant film. It was first sold in July 1979.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Spectra System

Polaroid introduced the Spectra at Jordan Marsh in Boston, 1986. It features a different format than the SX-70 or 600 camera: being a bit wider, the cinematic format is able to capture brighter exposures. Many variations of the Spectra followed this first release. The original model includes a 'Quintic' 125mm f/10 3-element plastic lens, self-timer, automatic exposure, sonar autofocus, AF, flash and lighten/darken controls, LCD display, and volume controls; later models had more or fewer controls.

The release of the Spectra camera was accompanied by the release of a correspondingly new Spectra film, called "Image" outside of North America, and sometimes called 1200 film. Spectra film is identical to 600 film - ISO speed, development method and operation remain identical - except if has a different image format: a rectangular 9.2 x 7.3cm rather than 600 film's square format.

Polaroid Swinger Model 20

Item is a white plastic box cameras for instant photographs on Polaroid type 20 film. The inexpensive model includes a telesopic viewfinder, AG-1 flash-bulb socket and flash range scale with red knob.

Polaroid Corporation

Super Colorpack

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Super Colorpack instant film camera. Similar to the Polaroid Super Shooter, the Super Colorpack has a rigid plastic body and a manual finder on the lens and uses peel-apart Land Pack Films.

Kodak Colorburst 300

Item is a snapshot camera for instant photographs using Kodak PR10 instant film. It was originally sold for $75.00 .

This model was part of a series that was Kodak's response to the successful instant cameras produced by Polaroid. A patent infringement case was brought against Kodak by Polaroid in 1977 and was finally settled in 1986, in Polaroid's favour. Kodak recalled all their instant cameras, offering customers a new camera or a rebate in exchange. A further, class action, lawsuit by consumers followed, resulting in Kodak further offering cash or credit for the return of the Kodak nameplate.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Trimprint 940

Item is a Kodak Trimprint 940. It is an instant camera that used film format HS 144-10 and cost $44.95 when released. Anyone who owned this camera was offered a rebate if the camera's nameplate was returned to Kodak, when Kodak lost a case against Polaroid and was forced to withdraw its instant cameras from the market for infringement of Polaroid's patent. Hence, many of this model of camera will be found without the 940 Kodak Trimprint nameplate. It was the successor to the Kodamatic 940.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Instant photographs

File contains example images created with Kodak Instant Print Film. Kodak's instant film had an iso of 80, created 10.8x8.3 cm transparencies, and was manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation between and 1997.

Eastman Kodak Company

Assorted Gelatin Silver Prints

Portraits of people by different publishers:
1 print by G. Marr
1 print by Evans & Hastings
1 print by Ea. Ray
1 print by McVey
2 prints by Edy Bros.
1 print by J. J. Schmidt
1 print by the Maitland Studio
1 print by Dixon
1 print by Hadden's Studio
2 prints by Mickelthamite
16 prints by unidentified publishers, one has a swastika on the front cover

Kodak Verichrome Safety Film in store stand up advertisement

Item consists of a stand up, cardboard cut-out poster advertising Kodak Verichorme Safety film, a black and white orthocrhomatic film manufactured between 1931 and 1956. The ad features a woman in a red striped dress holding a Kodak Duaflex II camera (manufactured between 1950 and 1954), a role of Verichrome 120 film, and a pile of black and white photographs, with an image of a man and a boy playing baseball visible.

Kodak Developing and Printing Outfit No. 2

Item consists of a cardboard box containing materials necessary to develop film and print black and white photographs at home. Items include a Kodak candle lamp darkroom light, glass chemical stirrer, glass measuring cup, darkroom thermometer, 3 black enameled printing trays, black enameled adjustable printing frame for 95 x 150 mm (3.75" x 6"), 95 x 95mm (3.75" x 3.75"), and 65 x 95 mm (2.5" x 3.75") prints. The set includes the original yellow Kodak box, and an insturction booklet for the use of the set.

Kodak wooden developing tank

Item consists of a wooden box used for black and white film developing, containing a stainless steel round metal film tank and reel for 120mm film, 2 handles for film winding that fit through holes in the box, 1 film spool, and a metal instrument. A metal spool holder is mounted to the inside of the box. To use the developing tank, the film backing paper is attached to a spindle in the wooden developing tank, along with a light-tight cover, all of which are wound onto the spindle. The spindle is then transferred to the metal developing tank to be processed.

Source: Early Photography (2019). Roll-film developing tanks. Retrieved from: http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk/site/entry_D70-X.html

Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 outfit case

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 with hard leather case, Polaroid flash model 281, 3 developing vials, leather strap, manual, and 7 loose papers. It used 40 series Polaroid Picture Roll Land film.

Polaroid Corporation