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Audiovisual series

Series contains video, film and sound recordings made as demonstration tapes for in-house meetings or advertising purposes. Some recordings document important visits to the Kodak Heights plant, meetings and product history, or awards acknowledging Kodak Canada's contributions to photography and the community.

Graphic materials series

Series contains graphic materials related to the operations of Kodak Canada Limited including Blueprints and Plans, Kodak Advertising Materials, and Posters and Signs. Blueprints and plans document the establishment of Kodak facilities in Ontario, including historical blueprints of the Kodak King street plant, as well as early diagrams and cyanotype blueprints of the Kodak Heights property drafted by The Canadian Pacific Railway. Kodak Advertising Materials includes a group of 35 Ad Ledgers containing proofs for Kodak ad campaigns from 1920-1987. Poster and signage include a group of posters publicizing Kodak's The Techniques of the Masters Videoconference Series, early images of Kodak Heights operationas reproduced on large-scale foamcore boards, and Kodak advertising campaigns reprinted on foam-core boards for the Kodak Heritage Museum.

Objects series

Series contains objects donated from Kodak Canada Inc. including plaques highlighting Kodak's community initiatives and corporate status, promotional items such as clothing, flags, keychains, pins, toys, badges, and medals provided to honor excellence within the Kodak company, and objects referencing Kodak's Olympic involvement.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Photographic equipment and materials series

Series contains 251 photographic materials and equipment donated by Kodak Canada Inc. including cameras, camera accessories, film and paper, photographic viewing and editing equipment, and processing equipment and materials. Objects have been arranged by the above stated categories. Most of the eqiupment and materials originated from the Kodak Canada Heritage Collection Museum, and specific reference to this original intent has been included in the notes and subject fields.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Photographs series

This series contains photographic albums, b&w negatives and prints, colour negatives and prints, colour slides, glass plate negatives and transparencies originating from the Kodak Canada Corporate Archives and Heritage Collection. These materials were used both as forms of documentation of the history of the company at various sites including Kodak Heights, Brampton, Montreal and Vancouver, as well as functioned as a working collection to use for promotional efforts. Highlights include: documentation of the construction of the Kodak Heights site circa 1915 in a series of commissioned albums and loose prints; documentation of the various operations related to the photographic and moving image industry including paper, film, and camera production and processing; marketing campaigns for digital initiatives; and a reference slide collection used by the Kodak Canada Corporation.

Photographic materials have been organized by format and within by the order created when processed in 2005. This arrangement was loosely based on the Kodak Canada's original organization of the files in their archives index. Files of photographs organized by the Kodak Canada Archives Index associated with the collection have been kept together, with the individual file numbers and index titles referenced in the Notes field of each record. Previously assigned reference numbers are indicated in the Archivist's Comments fields.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Published materials

Sub-series consists of textual materials published by Kodak, its subisidiaries, or external publishers between approximately 1891 and 2004. Includes published monographs, product catalogues and price lists, promotional pamphlets and brochures, instructional manuals and reference guides, and annuals and periodicals. Most published materials in the sub-series pertain to the history of Kodak or of photography more generally, Kodak products, photographic techniques and aesthetics, photographic chemistry, and other related topics.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Textual Records

Series consists of unpublished textual records produced as a result of the day-to-day operations of Kodak Canada from 1896 to 2005. Records pertain to the company's corporate operations, financials, plant, equipment, and supplies, communications, human resources and industrial relations activities, employee activities, and Heritage Collection and Museum. Series includes notes, correspondence, ledger and account books, financial statements, reports, recipes and instructions, contracts and agreements, publication drafts and mock-ups, lists and inventories, and other manuscript, typescript, and computer-created textual materials produced by Kodak Canada employees, contractors, and correspondents.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Deep Sea

Deep sea exploration involves diving at depths greater then humanly possible without a submersible vehicle, or greater than 1000 feet below the surface. In this series are moving images of hydrothermal vents, deep sea sharks, the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Komsomollets, and ocean floor ecology. Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in deep sea settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions. Some of the recordings are in Russian.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Lakes

In this series are moving images of underwater explorations of lakes in Canada (Lake Huron, Lake Erie) and a Russia (Lake Baikal). Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in lake settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions and promotional videos.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane

The items in this series all have to do with the discovery of the wreck of the HMS Breadalbane. The Breadalbane sank on August 21, 1853 in the Canadian Arctic.\~It was a British re-supply vessel sent out in search of the Franklin Expedition that had disappeared in 1846.\~Despite the fact that the Breadalbane sank only 15 minutes after colliding with ice, there were no casualties. The entire crew was rescued by the Phoenix, which was traveling with the Breadalbane. The Breadalbane shipwreck was discovered in August of 1980 by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during their 3rd search expedition. Recordings made during that expedition are in varying stages of production, from the raw footage to complete television and radio interviews.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

General

Items from this series are items that do not fit into any of the other categories or that have not been viewed and have not been placed in another series as of yet. Some of the types of recordings in this series are raw footage of jellyfish from mid waters and CBC live coverage of Pierre Eliot Trudeau’s funeral. This series also contains oceanography related documentaries and footage of miscellaneous dives

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Textual Records

Series contains text records found with moving images in the MacInnis Audiovisual collection.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Titanic

The Titanic, the largest and most luxurious passenger ship in the world for her time, sank during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg. Over 1,500 people perished. In 1985, the wreck of the Titanic was found on the ocean floor by a research team led by Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel. Dr. Joe MacInnis became the first Canadian to dive to the Titanic shortly afterwards. The footage in this collection features images of the ship obtained during a 1991 dive that formed the basis of the IMAX production Titanica. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to feature length films, and include programs from television and radio.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Edmund Fitzgerald

The items in this series all have to do with the ship the Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in Lake Superior on November 10th, 1975. The recordings concern the 1994 expedition led by Dr. MacInnis and his team’s efforts to find an answer for the demise of the vessel. Included are all stages of the cinematic process from raw footage to feature length films, as well as television and radio interviews about the ship and the process of recording the ship.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Camera accessories series

Series contains various photographic tools for use with a variety of camera models from many manufacturers. Accessories include: plate and film holders, tripods, cable releases, bellows, remote controls, adapters, clamps and various adapters.

Lenses and lens accessories series

Series contains various photographic lenses and accessories from many manufactures, for use with a variety of camera models. Items include wide-angle, zoom and specialty lenses, along with lens caps and filters.

Darkroom and printing equipment series

Series contains a variety of objects used in the development of film and the production of photographic prints using chemicals and light sensitive paper. Items include film developing tanks, developing trays, lighting systems, filter kits, paper easels, and enlargers.

Photographic chemicals series

Series contains a variety of chemicals used in the development of photographic film and paper and the processing of photographic prints. Items include toning chemicals, developing chemicals and print retouching tools.
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Early cameras

This series consists of original and duplicate early cameras from the beginning of the history of photography. Based on the basic design of the camera obscura and produced between about 1820 and 1870, these simple devices were usually solid or sliding box cameras with uncomplicated lenses. The shutter was normally outside of the lens, in the form of a lens cap that was simple removed and replaced for exposure, or a rotating metal plate on the front of the lens, which held the aperture. These cameras mainly predated dry plate and flexible film photography, and were used to take Daguerreotype, wet-plate and salted paper photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Dry plate cameras

This series contains cameras designed for use with commercially manufactured dry plate negatives. Produced between about 1880 and 1900, these cameras began to be marketed to amateur photographers due to the relative ease of using dry plates. Exposure times shortened, necessitating faster shutters, within the lens or camera. The equipment also became more compact, allowing for hand-held photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Folding (bellows) cameras

This series contains cameras designed for roll film and employed a folding design, in which a front flap opened and lens and bellows extended from the camera body. This design balanced the need to produce large sized negatives while making the cameras smaller, and more convenient than the box format cameras. Many were variations on the basic Kodak design that, when folded, resembled a long, flat box with rounded ends. Both brilliant viewfinders and optical direct finders were used in these designs and lenses were generally more advanced than the simple box cameras, with shutter speed and focus adjustments possible.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Box and snapshot roll film cameras

Series contains simple, snapshot cameras designed for mass public consumption, taking advantage of the new flexible roll film that was developed in 1883. The box camera was a logical follow up from the original simple camera obscuras, often having only one shutter speed, simple lenses with minimal f-stop capabilities and manual winds.

The trend arguably began with George Eastman's in 1888 with the first, amateur, handheld camera, "The Kodak", which came pre-loaded with 100 exposures. After exposure, the entire outfit was returned to the Eastman Kodak company, where the film was developed, prints made and sent back to the customer with the camera, now re-loaded with more film.

Many millions of similar cameras were sold, both high and low end, manufactured by different companies and eventually developing into the modern point-and-shoot camera.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Detective cameras

Items in this series are photographic devices designed to be inconspicuous, intended for photographers to make candid exposures without the subject being aware. The first detective cameras appeared with the production of commercially available dry plates and designs were simple box camera style constructions. These were, in fact, very similar to standard cameras of the time, but were smaller, handheld and able to make exposures relatively quickly. As smaller, flexible film materials became available, these cameras began to be produced disguised as objects such as pocket watches, ties, books, hats, pens and walking sticks.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Scovill & Adams Company

Panoramic cameras

Series contains cameras designed to take wide-angle photographs (images that are least twice as wide as they are tall). Cameras of this nature began to be produced soon after photography was invented, as photographers have always wanted to capture large group portraits, landscape views and skylines. Panoramic photographs are achieved by stitching several exposures together to create one image or with purpose built cameras of several designed, including banquet (similar to standard cameras with wider aspect ratios, designed to take photographs of large groups indoors), short rotation (uses a curved film plane, swinging lens and split shutter that the lens rotates around), and full or long rotation (capable of producing 360 degree views by rotating the camera and film past the shutter).

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Miniature and sub-miniature cameras

This series contains cameras designed to take photographs on flexible film sized smaller than 135 format film (24mm x 36mm). The size of the camera also tended to be very small, and often simply designed. While several companies manufactured high quality miniature cameras (including Minox and Rollei), many others were cheaply made and did not produce relatively poor results.

Film formats for miniature cameras were often priority, created by manufactures for their cameras specifically, and included the following sizes: 10mm x 14xx (16mm film), 13mm x 17mm film (110 film cartridges), 14mm x 14mm (used by "Hit" type cameras), 8mm x 11mm cartridge roll film (Minox), 11mm x 8mm disc film (Kodak).

Miniature cameras gained a reputation as "spy" cameras, and while some of the higher quality ones (including the Minox) were used by government agencies, most were simply for surreptitious, amateur use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Professional and press cameras

Series contains cameras designed to fulfill specific, professional functions such as surveying, aerial photography, studio portraits and press work. These cameras are often the best items in the manufacturers line, offering more features and a sturdier construction than their amateur counterparts.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Stereoscopic and multi lens cameras

Series contains cameras that have with more than one lens, to create multiple images on the same light sensitive film or plate. These cameras were designed for several purposes, the most popular being the stereoscopic, or three-dimensional, image. Most stereo cameras work by taking two simultaneous images from slightly varying points of view that correspond to the distance between the human eyes. The images are then mounted side-by-side and viewed through a stereoscope (a system of two lenses that helps to converge the two photographs, to mimic the depth perception of binocular vision). Other three-dimensional cameras used four or more lenses to create images for lenticular prints.
Some multi-lens cameras were intended to create multiple copies of the same scene at one time, such as the gem tintype camera and passport camera, while others had shutters that took sequential shots to create images which show the passage of time on one frame.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Single lens reflex cameras

Series contains single lens reflex, or simply reflex, cameras. This deign used a mirror at a 45 degree angle to allow the photographer to look through the lens when composing the photograph, therefore seeing exactly what will appear on the film. Brilliant and sports style viewfinders only alllowed an approximation of the image alignment.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Twin lens reflex cameras

Series contains cameras designed with two identical lenses, mounted one above the other, for composition and the other for exposure. The twin-lens design allows the photographer a continuous view of the subject while photographing, as the 45 degree angled mirror is mounted to the viewing lens only and therefore does not have to list out of the way during exposure, as in single lens reflex designs. Most designs used a waist level viewfinder with a ground glass.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

35mm cameras

Series contains cameras designed for use with standard 35mm (135 format) film. This became the most popular film and camera format, both among professionals and amateurs. Sturdy and multi-functional, with interchangeable lenses, these cameras found their way into civil wars, riots, and natural disasters around the necks of daring photojournalists as well as in homes and on vacation with advanced amateurs and photo-enthusiasts. Once exposed, the film was wound conveniently back into light-tight metal canisters that would protect the film until it could be developed.

For 35mm cameras marketed specifically to amateur photographers, see items in the Point-and-Shoot series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

In-camera processing (instant) cameras

Series consists of cameras that combine exposure and development in one step to create photographs instantaneously.
While Polaroid is by far the most well known of these cameras, the first patent for instant photography was for the Dubroni, a French wet plate camera, designed so that the glass plate could be sensitized and developed by pouring the chemicals over the plate through a tube in the camera. Later cameras were developed so small tintypes (1895) and direct paper positives (1913) could be made quickly for tourists on busy streets.
But it was the Polaroid Corporation that made instant photography a household item, beginning in 1937 when Edwin Land's young daughter's desire to see her photograph immediately, inspired him to develop the Polaroid's first instant camera: the Land Camera.

The Heritage Collection also contains Kodak Instant Cameras; produced in the late 1970's, they spawned a patent infringement lawsuit from the Polaroid corporation that resulted in the recall all of instant Kodak models sold and the discontinuation of their production.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Source: <a href="http://www.shutterbug.com/content/it%E2%80%99s-instant%E2%80%94-it%E2%80%99s-not-polaroid-pre-and-post-polaroids-1864-1976">Wade, John. "It's Instant - But It's Not Polaroid: Pre- And-PostPolaroids, From 1864 to 1976." Shutterbug : Published May 1, 2012.</a>

Point and shoot cameras

Series contains mainly inexpensive, fully automatic 35 mm cameras marketed strictly for amateur use. These cameras are the high tech descendants of the box camera and most models have no manual control over focus, aperture, shutter speed, film winding or metering. The viewfinder on point and shoot models is, like the box camera and unlike reflex style cameras, not integrated with the lens; there is no mirror directing the view from the lens to the eye of the photographer. Most of the point and shoot cameras require batteries for operation.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

One-time use cameras

Series contains cameras designed to be disposable. Usually simple, point and shoot cameras made of plastic cases with cardboard housings, these cameras were sold pre-loaded with film and returned to the photofinisher in tact for development. The plastic bodies were often returned to the manufacturer and re-used, with film and housing. Cameras such as this were marketed for travel, weddings, underwater or other situations where a more expensive camera may get damaged. They were available in different film speeds and some models included a flash.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Digital and pre-digital cameras

Series contains cameras that are designed to capture images using sensors and digital storage media instead of film, as well as pre-digital cameras that combined digital technology with film.
The digital camera replaced the traditional film camera in all but a few niche markets very quickly; as of the beginning of the 21st century, all amateur and most professional photogrpahy now takes place in the digital format. These early cameras track the rapid increase of image quality and camera optinos avilable to the consumer.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Toy and promotional cameras

Series contains cameras designed for children or created and distributed as marketing materials for different corporations. These cameras became most popular after the advent of film cartridges, as this greatly simplified the handling and lowered the cost. These cameras are predominantly inexpensive and simply designed, without features that allow the photographer to change aperture or shutter speed.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Motion-picture viewers

Series contains cameras that use film to capture moving images for display. While still image cameras expose one image at a time on photographic film, motion picture cameras take a series of images (or frames) on long strips of film that are then played back using a projector. The speed at which the film is projected matches that which it was taken, a speed (or frame rate) of 24 frames per second was long the standard in the motion picture industry, and is enough to appear to the human eye as motion and not simply a string of still images. Most of the cameras in this series are for amateur or "home movie" use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Video cameras

Series contains hand-held, shoulder-mounted, or structurally-attached cameras that use electronic components to record moving images and sound. Most items in this series are for home use. For cameras that record moving images using digital components, see the Digital and Pre-digital cameras series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Weisblatt, Betty

A.T. Orr family photographs series

Series consists of photographs and negatives that belonged to Mr. A.T. Orr and his family. Series also contains several business cards of Mr. Orr's, some of his personal correspondence, newspaper clippings pertaining to birth and wedding announcements, a hymnal, and a lock of Florence E. Orr's hair. Design plans for the Montreal Light Heat & Power Co. are also found in the series.

Albums series

Series consists of albums on a variety of subjects, but all are personal in nature, created by individuals or families. Many focus on geographic locations as subjects of a tour. Some WWI and WWII family and military tour records.

Cameras and optical devices series

Series consists of camera models, from individually hand-crafted to mass-produced, and camera equipment, including filters, light meters, and timers, and darkroom equipment, including enlargers, chemicals, and printing papers. Several non-photographic optical devices are also found in this series, including two toys, a mono print viewer, and a stereo film viewer.

Landscapes and industry series

Series consists of photographs of landscapes, usually featuring factories, mills, bridges or other industrial and man-made objects, and images of agriculture. There area few small sub-sets of images in this series related to sports, which show horses and jockeys, cars and grandstands at racing events.

Miscellaneous series

Series predominately consists of photographic reproductions of drawings or paintings, often on a cabinet card or carte de visite bases--these objects were mass produced for the commercial market using photography, but the original images were not photographic. Also included in this series are published photographic materials in the form of advertisements, books, and stereocards.

Portraits series

Series consists of cabinet cards, cartes de visite, ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, tintypes and gelatin silver prints made by professional photographers, generally featuring a studio mark or imprint. Prints are usually found mounted on cards.

Lantern slides series

Series consists of sets of lantern slides, often of historical monuments or landscapes. One set of painted slides appears to recount a story, with images of people outdoors on a farm, in a carriage, dancing and fighting. Another set of non-photographic painted slides depicts children working and playing. The slides in this series were mass produced for the commercial market.

Flags series

Series consists of flags and banners, very similar in style, often awarded in competition and sometimes titled a flag.

Documentary Films series

Series consists of biographical films about Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924), leader of the Soviet Union and father of Communism. These films were created and produced in the Russian Soviet State and reflect the ideals of the state and the popular interpretation of Lenin's life and work. The 17 film reels make up the following 4 movies: "Lenin is alive" (1969), "Lenin: pages of the biography" (1969), "Gorki Leninskie" (1984), "Lenin documents, facts, recollections" (1969). A DVD was added to the collection in 2010 that depicts the public speeches and demonstrations taking place in Vilnius, Lithuania during the dissolution of the Lithuanian Soviet State, including the tearing down of a statue of Lenin in the city centre.

Notes, Coins and Commemorative Medals series

Series consists of paper and metal currency, and medals. One of the notes belongs to the 1924 redenomination of the Soviet ruble, the rest are from the 1961 redenomination.

Paintings, Rugs and Embroidery

Series comprises paintings of Lenin on canvas or on wood, woven rugs, sashes and various needlework with Lenin as the subject.

Pins series

Series consists of lapel pins, many used to designate membership in a club like the Little Octoberists or Young Pioneers. Many are duplicates.

Posters series

Series is made up of large and small posters, all featuring rallying slogans for the Soviet Party, with such slogans as We Must Try to Raise the Party is Authority Higher, Higher and Higher,The Party Intellect, Glory and Conscience of Our Epoch, Listening to You Comrade. Most are illustrated with the face of Vladimir Illych Lenin. There is also a selection of citations issued by the Soviet Party and presented to individuals in honour of their work or military performance.

Postage Stamps series

Series consists of several collections of postage stamps, usually held in albums or envelopes with stamps printed on them.

Audio Discs

Series consists of audio recordings. The content of the recordings varies, from the National Hymn of the Union of Soviet Socialistic Republic International performed by the choir and orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre, to the poem "Portrait of V.I.Lenin" by V. Mayakovski, narrated by Mikhail Astangov, to "Children's Favourite Songs" by various authors and singers.

Scultpures and Reliefs series

Series consists of sculptures and reliefs of Lenin, as well as a piece of marble from Lenin's mausoleum. Media include metal, wood, bronze, plaster, stone, plastic, glass, porcelain, and clay.

Ephemera series

Series consists of sculptures and reliefs of Lenin, as well as a piece of marble from Lenin's mausoleum. Media include metal, wood, bronze, plaster, stone, plastic, glass, porcelain, and clay.

Toronto series

Series consists of photographs, photomechanical prints and drawings of buildings located in the Metropolitan Toronto Area, an administrative area that is now usually identified simply as 'Toronto'. The municipal districts included are: East York, Etobicoke, Forest Hill, Leaside, Long Branch, Mimico, New Toronto, North York, Scarborough, Swansea, Toronto, Weston and York.

Files for buildings in municipalities that are identified as part of the Greater Toronto Area but are not part of Metropolitan Toronto proper, including Mississauga, Vaughan and Markham, are found in the Ontario series.

Promotional film packages and stills

The series consists of promotional packages and film stills (press kits) put together by various Canadian, American and international film production companies and collected by the Toronto Film Society.

Toronto Film Society

British Film Institute Publications

Series contains monthly publications by the British Film Institute outlining the current films as selected and reviewed by a panel.
Critics Choice: http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/record=b2612745
Monthly Film Bulletin: http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/record=b2697103
NFT (National Film Theatre): http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/record=b2697103
Three Sixty : British Film Institute News: http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/record=b2699523

Toronto Film Society

Films and Kinescopes

This series contains films and kinescope copies of productions involving the director/producer Paddy Sampson.

Sampson, Paddy, 1926-2005

Toronto theatre programs

Series consists of 638 theatre programs published by Toronto theatres and theatre companies between the years 1959 and 2012.

Alumnae Theatre Company

Shaw Festival Theatre theatre programs

File consists of 39 theatre programs published by Shaw Festival Theatre in the years 1967, 1977, 1984-1989, and 1991-2012. The Festival produces the work of Bernard Shaw and plays from and about his era, as well as contemporary plays that share Shaw's vision. It started in 1962 and continues annually in the Niagara-on-the-Lake region.

Shaw Festival (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.)

Stratford theatre programs

Series consists of 77 theatre programs published by the Stratford Shakespearean Festival in the years 1960, 1961, 1963-1967, 1971, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980, 1986, 1987, 1991, 1993-1997, 2001-2012. The Stratford Festival is a festival that has occured annually from April to November since 1953 in Stratford, Ontario. The festival was originally devoted to producing soley the works of William Shakespeare, but since has expanded to focus primarily on classical repertoire.

Stratford Festival (Ont.)

Montreal theatre programs

Series consists of 9 theatre programs published by the following Montreal theatres: 1 The Colonade Theatre (1972), 1 Peter Cook and Spectrum Productions (1964), 5 Place des Arts (The World Festival 1967), 1 Scene (magazine, 1970), and 1 Theatre de l'Escale (Dominion Drama Festival 1968).

Ontario theatre programs

Series consists of a file of 7 theatre programs published by the following Ontario theatres: 2 Lyric Theatre (Kitchener, 1963), 1 Huron Country Playhouse (1980), 2 Living Arts Centre, Mississauga, 1 Markham Theatre (2009), 1 National Arts Centre (Ottawa, 1985), 1 Owen Sound Little Theatre (1989), and 1 Thousand Islands Playhouse (2002).

Canadian theatre programs

Series consists of 1 file of 11 theatre programs published by the following Canadian theatres: 4 The Citadel Theatre (Edmonton, 1998, 2001, 2008), 1 Granville Island Stage (Vancouver, 1986), 1 Mayfield Dinner Theatre (Edmonton, 1995), 1 Northern Light Theatre (Edmonton, 1980), 1 Theatre Nova Scotia, and 3 unknown.

Miscellaneous American theatre programs

Series consists of 1 file of 7 theatre programs published in the United States of America by the following theatres and theatre companies: 1 Artpark (1994), 1 Buffalo Centre for the Performing Arts (1979), 1 Ford's Theatre Society (1982), 2 Hangar Theatre (1987, 1991), 1 Shubert Theatre (1991), and 1 Weber Theatre Wheaton College (2003).

Australian theatre programs

Series consists of 3 theatre programs published in Australia by 2 Queensland Theatre Company (1975), and 1 Travesties Company (1978).

Len Didur - employee series

The sub-series contains 4 printed works on space photography and x-ray radiography produced by Eastman Kodak Company and either re-produced or re-distributed by Canadian Kodak Company Limited. One example of an x-ray photograph is included in this sub-series.

Didur, Len

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