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Descrição arquivística
Kodak Canada Inc. Rochester, New York Motion picture cameras
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Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Analyst Super 8

Item is a motion picture camera with black plastic body. In original box (opened) with manual folded inside. Used Kodak Super 8 film cartridge and was powered by 4 AA batteries (removed). Comes with Kodak Zoom lens f1.9 (13-28mm). Large red bulb on front.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak XL 55

Introduced by Kodak in 1971, XL (eXisting Light) was incorporated with Super 8 to use their new High Speed Ektachrome Super 8 colour film and was designed to be able to film in as low light conditions as possible. The lens aperture is F1.2 compared to the super 8 normal of F1.8 and the film intermittent mechanism film pulldown speed was increased to allow a shutter open angle of 230 degrees compared to a typical 160 degrees previously. No light was diverted away from the film for a reflex viewfinder or TTL metering. The Kodak XL cameras had a unique "binocular" shape allowing easy two handed shooting.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company