World War, 1914-1918

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World War, 1914-1918

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World War, 1914-1918

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World War, 1914-1918

16 Archival description results for World War, 1914-1918

16 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

John E. Twomey fonds

  • F 271
  • Fonds
  • 1934-1993

Fonds consists of reports, meeting minutes and other CJRT executive records, clippings, moving images, and photographs accumulated or created by Twomey during his tenure at Ryerson.

Twomey, John E.

Identification bracelet

Identification bracelet made from a French coin.
Small chainlink rope made into a bracelet by soldering ends onto a filed down franc. The front of the coin features a woman (The Sower, designed by Oscar Roty in 1900). The verse side was smoothed to allow for etching "Clara MacNeill C.A.M.C. 1916-1917, 1918-1919".

Uniform shoulder pips (crowns)

Four brass shoulder pips worn by Clarissa MacNeill as part of her uniform. Four pips gives her the rank of Lieutenant (2 on each shoulder epaulet) as a Nurse in the Canadian Army Medical Corps.
The design on the pips "Tria Juncta in Uno" around 3 crowns is taken from the Order of Bath -
"Field grade officers (Major, Lieutenant Colonel, Colonel) first began to wear distinctive rank badges in 1810, with captains and subalterns adopting insignia of their own in 1855. This was the first use of the crown and rank stars. The rank star chosen across the British Army was that of the Order of the Bath, though "Household" regiments wore different patterns of stars. Canadian Guards regiments also inherited this tradition." [www.canadiansoldiers.com]

British War Medal and Victory (Inter-allied) War Medal

Two WWI medals attached together on backing board. One is the British War Medal and the other is the Victory (Inter-Allied) War Medal. Awarded to Clarissa MacNeill for her service as part of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Her name and rank is engraved on the bottom edge of both medals. The following information on the medals can be found at the Veterans Affairs website:

British War Medal - A circular, silver medal, 1.42 inches in diameter. Obverse side shows the King George V, bareheaded coinage effigy, facing left, with the legend: GEORGIVS V BRITT : OMN : REX ET IND : IMP :. The reverse side shows a horseman (St. George, naked), armed with a short sword (an allegory of the physical and mental strength which achieves victory over Prussianism). The horse tramples on the Prussian shield and the skull and cross-bones. Just off-centre, near the right upper rim, is the sun of Victory. The dates 1914 and 1918 appear in the left and right fields respectively. It was attached to a watered ribbon is 1.25 inches wide, and consists of seven stripes: blue (0.125 inches), black (0.0625 inches), white (0.125 inches), orange centre (0.625 inches wide), white (0.125 inches), black (0.0325 inches), and blue (0.125 inches).

The medal was awarded to all ranks of Canadian overseas military forces who came from Canada between 05 August 1914 and 11 November 1918, or who had served in a theatre of war. Those who had enlisted in the O.M.F.C. in the United Kingdom and had not served in a theatre of war were not entitled to this medal. The requirements for RAF personnel were the same as for the army. Naval personnel were required to have 28 days of mobilized service or to have lost their lives before this period of service was complete. Seamen of the Canadian Merchant Marine who served at sea not less than six months, and crews of Dominion Government Ships and the Canadian Mercantile Marine were also eligible. There was no bar to this medal. The medal was authorized on 26 July 1919.

The Victory or Inter-Allied War Medal - Victory Medal (Inter-Allied War Medal: A circular, copper medal, lacquered bronze, 1.42 inches in diameter. The obverse side shows the winged, full-length, full-front, figure of Victory, with her left arm extended and holding a palm branch in her right hand. The reverse side shows the legend THE GREAT / WAR FOR / CIVILISATION / 1914 - 1919 in four lines, surrounded by a wreath, with dots below the words. The watered ribbon 1.5 inches (39 mm) wide, and consists of nine coloured stripes: violet, blue, green, yellow, red (centre), yellow, green, blue, and violet. Only the Mentioned-in-Despatches multiple-leaved emblem is worn on this medal when it was awarded for WWI. There were no other bars

The medal was awarded to all ranks of the fighting forces, to civilians under contract, and others employed with military hospitals who actually served on the establishment of a unit in a theatre of war between 05 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 (inclusive). It was also awarded to members of the British Naval mission to Russia 1919 - 1920 and for mine clearance in the North Sea between 11 November 1918 and 30 November 1919. This medal was never issued alone and was always issued with the British War Medal. The Inter-Allied War Medal was agreed to by all allies in March 1919. All medals were to be almost identical to obviate the need to exchange allied medals and each was patterned after a French medal of 1870. The medal was authorized in Britain (and for Canadians) on 01 September 1919.

Medals

File contains Canadian (British) and American World War I and II medals. Some were awarded to Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing class of 1915 alumnus Willmina Ferguson and the others were donated by her family to the Archives.

British War Medal, Victory (Inter-allied) War Medal and Mentioned in despatches oak leaf sprays

Two WWI medals attached together on backing board. One is the British War Medal and the other is the Victory (Inter-Allied) War Medal. Also included are 2 oak leaf sprays (one attached to Victory Medal and the other is loose). Awarded to Willmina Ferguson for her service as part of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Her name and rank is engraved on the bottom edge of both medals. The following information on the medals can be found at the Veterans Affairs website:

British War Medal - A circular, silver medal, 1.42 inches in diameter. Obverse side shows the King George V, bareheaded coinage effigy, facing left, with the legend: GEORGIVS V BRITT : OMN : REX ET IND : IMP :. The reverse side shows a horseman (St. George, naked), armed with a short sword (an allegory of the physical and mental strength which achieves victory over Prussianism). The horse tramples on the Prussian shield and the skull and cross-bones. Just off-centre, near the right upper rim, is the sun of Victory. The dates 1914 and 1918 appear in the left and right fields respectively. It was attached to a watered ribbon is 1.25 inches wide, and consists of seven stripes: blue (0.125 inches), black (0.0625 inches), white (0.125 inches), orange centre (0.625 inches wide), white (0.125 inches), black (0.0325 inches), and blue (0.125 inches).

The medal was awarded to all ranks of Canadian overseas military forces who came from Canada between 05 August 1914 and 11 November 1918, or who had served in a theatre of war. Those who had enlisted in the O.M.F.C. in the United Kingdom and had not served in a theatre of war were not entitled to this medal. The requirements for RAF personnel were the same as for the army. Naval personnel were required to have 28 days of mobilized service or to have lost their lives before this period of service was complete. Seamen of the Canadian Merchant Marine who served at sea not less than six months, and crews of Dominion Government Ships and the Canadian Mercantile Marine were also eligible. There was no bar to this medal. The medal was authorized on 26 July 1919.

The Victory or Inter-Allied War Medal - A circular, copper medal, lacquered bronze, 1.42 inches in diameter. The obverse side shows the winged, full-length, full-front, figure of Victory, with her left arm extended and holding a palm branch in her right hand. The reverse side shows the legend THE GREAT / WAR FOR / CIVILISATION / 1914 - 1919 in four lines, surrounded by a wreath, with dots below the words. The watered ribbon 1.5 inches (39 mm) wide, and consists of nine coloured stripes: violet, blue, green, yellow, red (centre), yellow, green, blue, and violet. Only the Mentioned-in-Despatches multiple-leaved emblem is worn on this medal when it was awarded for WWI.[Willmina Ferguson awarded two - one attached to medal and the other is loose.]

The medal was awarded to all ranks of the fighting forces, to civilians under contract, and others employed with military hospitals who actually served on the establishment of a unit in a theatre of war between 05 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 (inclusive). It was also awarded to members of the British Naval mission to Russia 1919 - 1920 and for mine clearance in the North Sea between 11 November 1918 and 30 November 1919. This medal was never issued alone and was always issued with the British War Medal. The Inter-Allied War Medal was agreed to by all allies in March 1919. All medals were to be almost identical to obviate the need to exchange allied medals and each was patterned after a French medal of 1870. The medal was authorized in Britain (and for Canadians) on 01 September 1919.

American war medal miniatures

Four miniature American WWI and WWII medals. Came into collection in a donation with Willmina Ferguson's medals, but could not have been awarded to her. No other provenance is known about these medals.

  1. American Silver Cross - first awarded in 1932 for gallantry in action - replaced the silver citation used in WWI.
  2. American WWI Victory medal with silver citation (small star attached to ribbon)
  3. Purple Heart
  4. Battle of Verdun, 1916 [This unofficial medal was "created on 20 November 1916 by the Municipal Council of Verdun to commemorate the heroism of its defenders. Originally intended to be awarded to those who served on the Verdun front between 21 February 1916 and 2 November 1916, the medal was, in fact, awarded to those who served anywhere on the Argonne and St Mihiel sectors between 31 July 1914 and 11 November 1918. The original, and most commonly found, version was by Vernier but since supplies of this medal were inadequate, others created Verdun medals and at least seven versions of varying rarity are known"] www.museumvictoria.com.au

Canadian Army Class A badge

Round bronze pin with "For Service at the Front" and a union jack on a shield in the centre. "C.E.F" is overtop of the shield. The back of the pin has "Penalty for misuse 500 dollars or 6 months imprisonment. The badge has been altered - the central pin was removed and another pin was soldered on either side. One side of the alteration obscured the serial number that was on the pin.

The history of the badge can be found on the Veterans Affairs website:
"The Initial CEF issue is a bronze button 14/16 inches (22 mm) in diameter with a screwback fitting; the outside a circle with the words FOR SERVICE AT THE FRONT above and . . + . . below; the centre an enamel Union Jack in the form of a Tudor shield on a pebbled ground; this is surmounted by C.P.F. (Canadian Patriotic Fund); the reverse with stamped serial number. On a subsequent issue of the badge, C.P.F. was replaced with CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force).
Final CEF Award Criteria
Members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) who served at the front and had retired or relinquished their commissions, been honourably discharged, or returned to or retained in Canada on duty.
Members of the Imperial Forces, subject to the same conditions as members of the CEF, provided they were Canadian residents on the 4th day of August, 1914, and had returned to reside in Canada.
Ex-members of the RAF who served only in England were also eligible for the badge if they had been "actively engaged with the enemy whilst on the strength of an operational unit in Great Britain." (National Archives of Canada, RG24, Vol. 1764, File DHS 12-3, "Circular Letter No. 50, October16, 1919. Issue of Class "A" War service Badge Ex-member of the Royal Air Force who served only in England.")" (http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/medals-decorations/war-service-badges)

Records pertaining to employee involvement in WWI

File contains documents related to Kodak staff involvment in the First World War. Includes newspaper clippings from the Toronto Star Weekly of July 17, 1916 detailing the use of building 5 of Kodak Heights as barracks for the 127th battalion, with an accompanying list detailing the names of officers pictured. Also included is a photocopied letter to then-general manager of Canadian Kodak, John G. Palmer, from an officer of the 2nd Battalion regarding the transfer of J[ames] W. Spence from England to France. Spence was an active executive member of Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd., eventually acting as chairman of the board from 1955-1957.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Reproduced photographs

File contains reproductions of photographs used by corporate communications and also likely by the Kodak Canada Heritage Collection and Museum. Subject matter includes: Plant and facilities at Colborne and King streets; Kodak Heights; factory work; employees; wartime; product images; dental and medical photography; George Eastman; corporate events; and others. Some reproductions annotated.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Records related to the use of building #5 as barracks during WWI

File includes two letters written March 13 and 14, 1916, by Kodak Canada Engineer in Charge, C.O. Flint (a.k.a C.K. Flint), detailing the use of Kodak Heights building #5 as barracks for the 127th battalion during World War I. Also includes a magazine clipping pertaining to the same subject and two photocopies of the "Kodak barracks -- Mt. Dennis Standing Orders" by Lt. Col. F.F. Clarke.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Records pertaining to miscellaneous written publications

File contains records created during the process of publishing various books, magazine articles, and other forms of press, including articles for Kodakery Canada, InFocus, and Kodak Canada News. Items include memos, correspondence, annotated drafts, images, and other ephemera. Subjects of publications include: Kodak pioneers; Kodak Canada's Vancouver processing lab; Kodak's role in metropolitan Toronto; airshow photography; Kodak's relationship with Quebec; Kodak products, employees, and awards; antique cameras; Kodak's role in both World Wars; and nature photography.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Aviation album

Black cardboard cover with gold embossed letters "Photographs"; image on cover. Spine missing but stitched binding intact. Black pages.

Photographs of aerial exhibitions at Texas Love Field Air Corps Training Depot on November 12 and 13, 1918 to celebrate the end of WWI. Fairly detailed notations included as text printed directly onto the images. Images show pilots and early airplanes, photographs of blimps; select number of aerial photographs of the land with respective geographic locational coordinates, crowds of spectators, parachute jump - with flags, images of airplane crashes.
Most photographs taken from the air.

WWI family album

Brown cloth cover with gold embossed letters- "Photographs." Black pages with photographs mounted with glue. Notation on photo borders with black ink. Sewn binding. Photographs are mostly family snapshots of people, sometimes with automobiles or in uniform from the Northcote family. Also included are images of golfing, bridges, fishing, horse riding, camping, farms, cattle, sheep, chicken coops, horse drawn sleigh, the beach, trees, houses, dogs, trains, children, biking, deer and wagons. Three newspaper articles are pasted in. One about the Northcote family (mother, six sons and two daughters) all serving in the war, one about Pte. Wm. Clements dying in battle, and one of Corporal Northcote being the first Royal Engineer to be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.