Underwater exploration

Taxonomy

Code

http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85139619

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

  • Library of Congress Subject Headings

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Underwater exploration

Underwater exploration

Equivalent terms

Underwater exploration

  • UF Exploration, submarine
  • UF Exploration, underwater
  • UF Ocean exploration
  • UF Submarine exploration
  • UF Under water exploration
  • UF Undersea exploration

Associated terms

Underwater exploration

52 Archival description results for Underwater exploration

52 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Sub Int. looking at lannonar sci. equip ; #18

This underwater recording is of scent traps at various depths and the sea life that ate the bait. The traps are recorded at depths of 490 feet, 1000 feet and 2007 feet. The traps contain brine shrimp and fluorescein, a substance that is used to cause fluorescence and therefore visibility. Shrimp and a jellyfish that have eaten the bait can be seen at the deepest depth in this recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Jelly Fish single/multiple ; #19

This recording is of hundreds of jellyfish swimming at an undisclosed depth. The highlight of this recording is a mass of jellyfish that are together for unknown reasons. Those conducting the research theorize that the jellyfish are either caught together, there tentacles intertwined and knotted, or feasting on something.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Parks in the sea - California's underwater state parks

This documentary explores the diverse types of aquatic life that live in California’s underwater state parks. The focus of this film is on ecology and aquatic diversity but also mentioned are the relationship between land and sea along California’s coastline, and the types of diving possible in individual parks.

Al Giddings; Images Unlimited Inc.

Kiel port U-Boat Memorial

Raw footage of Emory Kristof walking on bridge by Kiel. This tape include several takes of Kristof walking, leaning over rail and shots of the waterfront.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Bermuda Sub-Dive, Emory Eugene Shark Baiting

Unedited live action footage of six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait in a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The recording also includes other types of deep ocean animal life like crabs, eels and/or fish and an unidentified translucent creature. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, an edited and produced version of this recording.

Glen Warren Productions

MIR Dive - Kamchatka - Edited tape

This recording is of hydrothermal vents and surrounding chemosynthetic life deep on the ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. This recording was made by the MIR submersibles that travel with their mothership RV Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, an oceanographic research vessel. The submersibles can reach depths of 6000 meters (almost 20,000 feet).

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG Atlantic vents

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.
Deep sea sharks Bermuda 4,000' is an edited live action recording of two six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait that is inside a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The unedited version of this version can be seen in: Bermuda sub-dive roll 3; Emory Eugenie shark baiting. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in: Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, a produced version of the recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

The New Explorers: Walking among the sharks

This episode documents a deep sea submersible dive to study the lingcod and the six-gill shark. The lingcod are food fish that live in various diverse depths. The marine researchers aboard the submersibles are studying the causes and effects of the depleting lingcod populations, concentrating study on the baby lingcod population, and comparing lingcod baby numbers found in shallower depths to lingcod babies found in deep depths. As for the six-gill sharks, the goal is simply to learn more about them. The six-gill sharks are a relatively newly discovered type of shark that lives deep in the ocean. The equipment used to conduct the dives are the Deep Rover submersible, the Aquarius 2000 submersible and the Newt Suit deep diving suit. The episode is more focused on the process of underwater exploration rather than the findings that resulted from this.

Kurtis Productions

Magic Shadows Titanic - Day 4

The film is of Elwy Yost, of TVOntario, interviewing Dr. Joseph MacInnis. The interview is conducted at the Royal Ontario Museum during the Titanic exhibition. Topics covered are the ownership of the Titanic, MacInnes' dive to the Breadalbane in 1980, and MacInnis' relationship with Robert Ballard. MacInnis also discusses his books " The Land That Devours Ships" and "Underwater Man".

Yost, Elwy McMurran, 1925

MacInnis AudioVisual Collection

  • 2005.002
  • Fonds
  • [ca. 1934-2004]

The collection consists of audio, video and film recordings made by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during his underwater dives from the 1970s to 2004. The bulk of the collection concerns the shipwrecks of the Titanic, the Breadalbane and the Edmund Fitzgerald. There are also many films that highlight deep sea ecology and oceanography, particularly hydrothermal vents and deep sea sharks. Most recordings in the collection consist of rough or unedited footage. The collection also includes television and radio programs on which Dr. MacInnis appeared and some video and audio recordings by MacInnis' friends and colleagues. There is a small selection of footage collected by MacInnis for research purposes, including footage of William Beebe and Otis Barton's deep sea dives in their revolutionary 'bathysphere' in 1934.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Titanic: Treasures of the Deep

The film is a documentary account of the preparation and descent of the Russian submersibles MIR 1 and MIR 2 into the depths of the Titanic. Hosted by Walter Cronkite. The film begins with a merger of underwater technology between North Americans and Russians, a technology pioneered by the Russians. Following this, a team of researchers, explorers, photographers, filmmakers and scientists board the Russian ship Akademik Keldysh on route to explore the Titanic. Two submersibles are launched on a 24-hour day schedule and the images recorded are extraordinary. The film then focuese on the treasures found in the deep; ceramics, coins, an unopened safe, as well as parts of the ship that were at this time previously unexplored and provide clues to the sinking of this massive ship.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

General

Items from this series are items that do not fit into any of the other categories or that have not been viewed and have not been placed in another series as of yet. Some of the types of recordings in this series are raw footage of jellyfish from mid waters and CBC live coverage of Pierre Eliot Trudeau’s funeral. This series also contains oceanography related documentaries and footage of miscellaneous dives

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane

The items in this series all have to do with the discovery of the wreck of the HMS Breadalbane. The Breadalbane sank on August 21, 1853 in the Canadian Arctic.\~It was a British re-supply vessel sent out in search of the Franklin Expedition that had disappeared in 1846.\~Despite the fact that the Breadalbane sank only 15 minutes after colliding with ice, there were no casualties. The entire crew was rescued by the Phoenix, which was traveling with the Breadalbane. The Breadalbane shipwreck was discovered in August of 1980 by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during their 3rd search expedition. Recordings made during that expedition are in varying stages of production, from the raw footage to complete television and radio interviews.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Titanic

The Titanic, the largest and most luxurious passenger ship in the world for her time, sank during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg. Over 1,500 people perished. In 1985, the wreck of the Titanic was found on the ocean floor by a research team led by Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel. Dr. Joe MacInnis became the first Canadian to dive to the Titanic shortly afterwards. The footage in this collection features images of the ship obtained during a 1991 dive that formed the basis of the IMAX production Titanica. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to feature length films, and include programs from television and radio.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

GL '94 MacInnis profile

CBC produced a profile of Joseph MacInnis, depicting him as an adventurer with a lifelong passion for the water. Reporter Suhana Meharchand presents MacInnis' discoveries of the Titanic, Breadalbane, and Edmund Fitzgerald shipwrecks, as well as his Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River pollution research project.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Edmund Fitzgerald

The items in this series all have to do with the ship the Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in Lake Superior on November 10th, 1975. The recordings concern the 1994 expedition led by Dr. MacInnis and his team’s efforts to find an answer for the demise of the vessel. Included are all stages of the cinematic process from raw footage to feature length films, as well as television and radio interviews about the ship and the process of recording the ship.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep Sea

Deep sea exploration involves diving at depths greater then humanly possible without a submersible vehicle, or greater than 1000 feet below the surface. In this series are moving images of hydrothermal vents, deep sea sharks, the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Komsomollets, and ocean floor ecology. Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in deep sea settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions. Some of the recordings are in Russian.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Lakes

In this series are moving images of underwater explorations of lakes in Canada (Lake Huron, Lake Erie) and a Russia (Lake Baikal). Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in lake settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions and promotional videos.

MacInnis, Joseph B.