Three-dimensional imaging

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Three-dimensional imaging

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Three-dimensional imaging

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Three-dimensional imaging

20 Archival description results for Three-dimensional imaging

20 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Tru-Vue

Item is a viewer made from Bakelite that allows the viewing of stereo transparencies. Stereo transparency included.

View-Master

Item is a child's photo viewing system which allowed stereoscopic viewing of a single picture in 3D. A disc with mini slide pictures was inserted, and could be rotated within the viewmaster to change the view.

Fed CTEPEO stereo camera

Item is a 35mm stereo camera with CdS metering. Manual or automatic exposure. 24 x 29mm images. Industar-81 F2.8/38mm lenses. Comes with leather pouch, sun shades, small parts, and hard plastic case.

Stereo Realist 1042

Item is a stereo camera produced in the early 1950's when the format became widely popular with amateur photographers. The camera uses 35mm film, has 2 anastigmat lenses, 3.5/35mm with a shutter speed of 1-1/150. The camera has a flash synch on the top.

Nimslo 3D

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera developed by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo and manufactured in the UK. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, coupled with a shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, 35mm film was sent to the Nimslo Co. in England and a few other specialty labs. The customer received developed, autostereo (lenticular) colour prints, which allow a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Coronet "3-D"

Item is an inexpensive plastic "3-D" stereo camera made by the Coronet Camera Company. The camera has a binocular viewfinder for 4 stereo pairs or 8 single exposures and uses 127 film for 4.5 x 5 cm exposures, featuring a single speed shutter, 1/50, and a twin f11 meniscus fixed-focus lenses.

Action Tracker ADI

Item is a small, plastic novelty camera that shoots four consecutive photos on one frame of 35 mm film. The rotating shutter exposes them in sequence, at intervals of about 0.22 sec.The result is four images on a single negative that show the movement of a subject in phases. The process uses the same concepts as the stop-motion animation used by Eadweard Muybridge in his Animal Locomotion series of the late 1800's. The camera is a very simple design and has no focusing or aperture control and a simple sports style viewfinder. The shutters are fixed at 1/100 of a second.

Kodak Stereo

Item is a stereo camera for creating two 24 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera has a built in sprit level to ensure that ideal stereo effect is achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for viewing images shot with the camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter.

Nishika N8000

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera, originally developed by the Nimslo company, the Nishika copies were created after Nimslo was taken over by Nishika in 1989. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, a fixed 1/60th shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, the 35mm film had to be sent to specialty labs equipped for autostereo (lenticular) colour printing, which produced a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo, of the original company.