stereoscopic cameras

Taxonomy

Code

300022659

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Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

stereoscopic cameras

stereoscopic cameras

Equivalent terms

stereoscopic cameras

  • UF double-lens cameras
  • UF twin-lens cameras
  • UF stereo cameras

Associated terms

stereoscopic cameras

24 Archival description results for stereoscopic cameras

24 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a camera with brown bakelite and metal case with two lenses for producing stereo views from 35mm film. Each is a Kodak Anaston lens with f3.5 (35mm). A single periscopic viewfinder is used, with a spirit level below to help keep the camera level in order to acheive good results. Light brown leather carrying case included.

Eastman Kodak Company

Stereoscopic Cameras

Series consists of 17 cameras designed to take identical images of the same subject from two lenses, approximately 2.5 inches apart or the same distance between human eyes. Cameras are able to make stereo pairs or single images. Cameras in this series range between ca.1850 and ca.1996.

The stereoscope was invented by Charles Wheatstone in 1838 to demonstrate binocular vision and its role in depth perception. Wheatstone used a pair of drawings to show how each eye could see a slight difference in each image, until the single images are superimposed onto each other through a stereoscope, revealing a three-dimensional effect. With the later establishment of photography, creation of Sir David Brewster's portable stereoscope in 1894 and the introduction of the wet-plate collodion process in 1851, did the stereoscopic industry rise to popularity.

Prior to the development of stereo-cameras, a single camera was used to produce either two daguerreotypes or calotypes in succession. The camera would be moved a few inches to one side between exposures in an attempt to produce pictures that looked identical or what was seen by the two eyes. However, this method was based off trial and error, as the quality of the three-dimensional effect might have been compromised by inadequate distance between exposures or alteration of camera angle, subject, and lighting conditions.

The two basic camera types designed to produce stereoscopic pairs are the single-lensed and double-lensed cameras. The double-lensed or binocular cameras allowed photographers to make simultaneous exposures for more accurate stereo photographs. The increasing demand for stereo imagery called for more portable cameras. Field cameras that folded to a compact size enabled photographers to leave the studio and produce stereos outdoors or previously inaccessible places. Later camera designs would have a standard format of 23x 24 mm with a focal length of 35mm and faster shutter speeds.

3D binocular viewfinder camera (Coronet)

Item is a plastic stereo camera typically found through mail order catalogues. For 4.5 x 5 cm exposures on 127 mm roll film. Shutter speed 1/50. Twin f11 menscus fixed focal lenses. Lens are labelled as 1 and 2. Written on item: Bioncular viewfinder patents applied for, coronet 3-D, present use 127 film, to take 8 picture close cover blase over No.1 lens make exposures on every number from 1 to 8, to take 4 pairs stereo picture open cover blase over no.1 lens. make exposures only on odd numbers (1, 3, 5 and 7), use no. 127 roll film.

3D binocular viewfinder camera (Coronet)

Item is a plastic three-dimensional stereo camera with binocular viewfinder. This item makes 4 stereo pairs or 8 single images, exposure is 4.5 x 5 cm on 127 mm roll film. The single shutter-speed is 1/50, twin f11 meniscus fixed-focus lenses, lenses are separated by 53 mm. Instructions on how to use the camera on labelled on the back of the object by manufacturer. Item has simple uncoated lenses with flash contacts on the right side.

Bass Stereoscopic Photography Collection

  • 2018.09
  • Collection
  • [ca. 1850 - ca. 1996]

The collection contains stereoscopic photographs, viewers, and cameras, collected by the donors between the 1970's and the 1990's and dating from the 1850's to the 1990's. Material includes a variety of viewers, cameras, photographs, and ephemera relating to three-dimensional photography.

Fed CTEPEO stereo camera

Item is a 35mm stereo camera with CdS metering. Manual or automatic exposure. 24 x 29mm images. Industar-81 F2.8/38mm lenses. Comes with leather pouch, sun shades, small parts, and hard plastic case.

Stereo Realist 1042

Item is a stereo camera produced in the early 1950's when the format became widely popular with amateur photographers. The camera uses 35mm film, has 2 anastigmat lenses, 3.5/35mm with a shutter speed of 1-1/150. The camera has a flash synch on the top.

Nimslo 3D

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera developed by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo and manufactured in the UK. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, coupled with a shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, 35mm film was sent to the Nimslo Co. in England and a few other specialty labs. The customer received developed, autostereo (lenticular) colour prints, which allow a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Brilliant V6

Item consists of a plastic body box camera with a viewfinder. The camera includes a Voigtar 7.7/7.5cm lens and a compartment for the filter and extinction meter.

Tessina 35

Item is a subminiature camera for 14 x 21 mm exposures on 35 mm film in special cartridges. The camera is a side-by-side twin-lens reflex camera with one lens reflecting upward to the ground glass for viewing and the other lens, a Tessinon f2.8/25 mm, reflects the image down to the film which travels across the bottom of the camera. The shutter speed is 2-500 and the camera has a spring-motor advance for 5-8 frames per winding.

Coronet "3-D"

Item is an inexpensive plastic "3-D" stereo camera made by the Coronet Camera Company. The camera has a binocular viewfinder for 4 stereo pairs or 8 single exposures and uses 127 film for 4.5 x 5 cm exposures, featuring a single speed shutter, 1/50, and a twin f11 meniscus fixed-focus lenses.

View-Master Personal Stereo Camera

Item is a black stereo camera for making your own View-Master slides. Film was wound twice through the camera with lenses raised/lowered for each pass. The camera make 69 stereo pairs of 12 x 13 mm exposures. It features a matched view-master anastigmat f3.5/25 mm coated lenses and has a 1/10-1/100 shutter.

Primo-Jr.

Item consists of a twin-lens reflex camera for exposures using 4 x 4 cm TLR for 127 film. The camera includes a Topcor 1 : 2.8 =6cm lens and a Toko 1 : 2.8 f=6cm lens. Carl Zeiss Planar lens. Attached to the camera is a black Primo lens cap.

Rolleicord II Model 3

Item consists of a twin-lens reflex camera. The camera includes a f3.5/75 mm Carl Zeiss Jena Troitar lens and a Heidoscop Anastigmat lens. The shutter is a Frankes & Heidecke Compur shutter. Item comes with a black metal lens cap.

Seagull 4B-1

Item consists of a 120 twin-lens reflex camera in its original purple packaging, including the original instruction booklet. The camera uses 120 roll film for 12 frames on 6 x 6 cm exposures or 16 frames on 4.5 x 6 cm exposures. The camera has two f1:3.5/75 mm lens and a 1-300 shutter.

Rolleiflex Old Standard

Item consists of a twin-lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 film. Contains a Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f4.5/75 mm lens and a Heidoscop-Anastigmat f3.1/75 mm lens and a Compur shutter.The camera has a Carl Zeiss Jena lens cap.

Kodak Stereo

Item is a stereo camera for creating two 24 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera has a built in sprit level to ensure that ideal stereo effect is achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for viewing images shot with the camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter.

Nishika N8000

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera, originally developed by the Nimslo company, the Nishika copies were created after Nimslo was taken over by Nishika in 1989. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, a fixed 1/60th shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, the 35mm film had to be sent to specialty labs equipped for autostereo (lenticular) colour printing, which produced a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo, of the original company.