Photography--History

Taxonomy

Code

http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008109260

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

  • Library of Congress Subject Headings

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Photography--History

Equivalent terms

Photography--History

Associated terms

Photography--History

269 Archival description results for Photography--History

269 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Tru-Vue viewer box set (Tru-Vue company)

Item is a brown plastic 3D viewer built with a push-down lever between the lenses. The lever is designed to rotate a reel containing three-dimensional black and white 35 mm acetate film manufactured by Tru-Vue Company. Images are inserted through the slot on the left side of the lenses. Item comes with square plastic windows to illuminate backs of transparencies on view. Once the film is circulated, it rewinds itself on the right hand side of the viewer. Item comes in original box with 6 original films depicting the Golden Gate Exposition and San Francisco’s major landmarks. Item also comes with original pink catalogue explaining how to use the Tru-Vue and how to order new film, as well as a business card for True-Vue Inc, that is also an order form. Written on object : Tru-View Rock Island, Ill. U S PAT. 90564 Made in U.S.A. Written on box : Tru-Vue Ins. Pictures With Depth Rock Island Illinois Printed And Made In U.S.A.

Gardner's Art Through the Ages

Series contains images to accompany Gardner's Art Through the Ages, 10th edition. Topics include sculpture, architecture, painting, and photgoraphy from ancient to modern. Slides are housed in 1 binder, with index included.

The Macmillan Company of Canada Limited

Wooden camera obscura [replica]

Cameras of this kind were used during the 18th and 19th century by artists and travelling tourists to sketch landscapes and buildings. A piece of transparent paper was placed on the matte screen. One could now trace the outlines of the subject as a guide for later elaborate sketching or painting. It was the predecessor of photographic cameras which, after 1839, could record the image by the reaction of chemical substances to light. Later the simple meniscus lenses were replaced by more corrected lens elements.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Tru-Vue viewer box set (Tru-Vue company)

Item is a brown plastic 3D viewer built with a push-down lever between the lenses. The lever is designed to rotate a reel containing three-dimensional black and white 35 mm acetate film manufactured by Tru-Vue Company. Images are inserted through the slot on the left side of the lenses. Item comes with square plastic windows to illuminate backs of transparencies on view. Once the film is circulated, it rewinds itself on the right hand side of the viewer. Item comes in original box with 4 original films depicting Pikes Peak Region and Depth Photography. Item also comes with instructions on how to use the Tru-Vue set and an additional business reply card with more instructions for the camera.

Combination graphoscope and stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden combination graphoscope and stereoscope. The graphoscope is a viewing device used to enlarge photographs and text. Item is a built with a magnifying glass in a wooden frame that can collapse onto itself. Whereas, the Stereoscope was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Item has a cut out of a clover leaf on the cardholder. This item comes with a removable viewing lens for the stereoscope. Underneath the body is an extendable handle, this accessory allows for the stereoscope to be either handheld or sit as a tabletop viewer.

Metal hand held viewer

Item is a black handheld stereoscope made of metal and attached to a wooden handle. Viewer has no hood. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Miniature combination graphoscope and stereoscope viewer

This item is a miniature wood and plastic combination viewer and stereoscope. Item has two parts that can elevate the viewer and stereoscope to a preferred view. Graphoscope is a viewing device used to enlarge photographs and text. Item is a made of a magnifying glass in a wooden frame and can collapse into a compact form. Whereas the stereograph was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Polyorama style stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden polyorama style stereoscope and comes with a glass stereograph depicting a group of people standing in front of Niagara Falls. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. First, the stereograph is placed in the card holder. Next the user would look through the opposing lenses. This would create the effect of merging both images to mimic a three-dimensional single image. The viewer comes with a flap designed to distribute more light into the viewer and glass front.

Written on stereograph : Point of View-Summer. No 29, James Thomas, Niagara Falls.

Kromskop stereoscopic table viewer

Item is a Kromskop viewer developed by Frederic E. Ives in 1895. Item comes with 1 monochrome transparency made from 3 colour separation negatives layered together; these transparencies were often referred to as kromograms. Kromograms were known as early examples of colour photography available as both mono and stereo images. A glass monoschrome plate is placed on top of object, when viewed through glass eye holes the image is overlapped with three kromograms making the stereograph appear three-dimensional and coloured. It is built in a staircase-shaped box with two eyeholes on the front. The articulated base allows the viewer to be properly oriented with light. At the back of the object is a tilting mirror. The mirror is designed to redirect light into the virtual window above. Lighting can be controlled so that the colour will not be distorted and take on a dominate colour.

Achromatic stereoscope viewer

Item is a wooden and brass stereoscope with wooden hood cover. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Item is a box type viewer which folds into it's own storage case. Additional reflector can be placed in adjustable brass arms to illuminate transparencies with its white or mirrored side. Viewer is mounted on underside of the lid case. Once inverted and lowered into the box the base becomes the the cover. Lock on either side designed to hold object in place. Later versions of this object included storage units for both viewer and slides. Such as a vertical model able to adjust the viewer to a convenient height and a horizontal cabinet to house stereoviews.

Written on lenses: Achromatic Smith Beck & Beck; Stereoscope 31 Cornell London.

Stereoscopic views boxset

This item is a wooden stereoscopic box set with hand held viewer. Viewer is able to fold on top of itself and is made of wood and leather. Box has 45 stereoscopic slides made from various publishing studios such as Kilburn and Underwood & Underwood. This box contains two dividers to keep stereocards stored in. Interior lid of box has inscription "Benny N Roadhouse, Garwick, July 1891." This object was used to view two identical images, or stereographs, as one three-dimensional photograph.

Stereograph box with built in stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a upright wooden box made to house stereographs. There are three slots in the box with 30 stereographs of Palestine ca. 1899 inside. Images were produced by several different stereo studios such as Underwood & Underwood and Keystone View Company. The stereoscope is made out of wood with a metal hood covering the viewer from additional light.This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Revolving stereoscope viewer (J.W. Cadwell)

Item is a wooden tabletop revolving stereoscope. Handles on sides of the object turn a internal central axle built to rotate stereographs. Stereograph slots come with a clip that holds two stereographs back to back. Double viewer is hooded to control additional light and moves to adjust view.

Cadwell, J.W.

View-Master deluxe projector

Item is a brown electric view master projector manufactured by Swayer's Inc. Originally this item was meant as an educational tool for adults but quickly became a popular children's toy. Item is made of plastic and metal. This projector has adjustable lenses, 100 watt light bulb, metal angle adjustment, slot to insert reels on the top and vent to cool light. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. From box: 100 watt projector, 1/2.8 lens, 2 1/4 focal lengeth, and 50" picture image. This projector was designed to project view master reels against flat white screens.

Airequipt stereo theatre viewer

This item is a grey and red metal personal viewer with a built in light source to illuminate backs of colour transparencies. Viewer can be adjusted by either knob on the sides or top. The push leaver on the side rotates the images within the reel.

Uncle Sam's movie projector and movie tracer

This item is a brown electric projector with a metal exterior and 1 reel containing paper duracolour filmstrips. On either side of the object are spindles designed to hold the film.Some versions of this item come with a sound mechanism that can be attached on the centre of the turning wheel by a screw. The handle turns both the film and audio simultaneously. This object was intended to be a children's toy.

Cheiroscope viewer (optical drawing device)

This item is an optical drawing device. It was designed to trace images appearing in the reflection of the mirrors. There are two slots on either part of the device to hold templates. The mirror swings back and forth beneath the stand to ensure a better view of the templates. Item comes with original manual titled "When And How To Use The Cheiroscope In Visual Training By Dr. Lee H. Jalonack O.D.F.D.S.F"

Hummingbird combination graphoscope and stereoscope viewer

Item is a black and green combination viewer and stereoscope with hummingbird and lily pad carvings detailed with minerals. Graphoscope is a viewing device used to enlarge photographs and text. Item is a made of a magnifying glass in a wooden frame and can collapse into a compact form. Whereas the stereoscope was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. This object can collapse into a compact form.

Pontioscope viewer

This item is an optical instrument designed to create larger three-dimensional experiences from a two-dimensional photograph. Item is made of wood and has two sets of lenses made to enlarge images. Lenses also create different effects: "day effect" caused by reflected light, and a"night effect" created from a transparency with light shining through it. Item folds down onto itself. The pontioscope was one of many optical instruments designed by Carlo Ponti (1823-1893). Ponti also made and distributed stereoviews of Italian cities and reproductions of art. In 1866, Ponti became the official photographer to the king of Italy. Eventually opening other branches throughout Europe, America and Canada. In 1868, a legal battle began between Carlo Naya and Carlo Ponti over the rights to Ponti’s inventions. Naya had worked with Ponti from 1857 onwards developing pictures under his trademark,however, in 1868 Naya began selling imitations of Ponti’s inventions. In 1876, Ponti attempted to get back the sole rights to his invention but was unsuccessful.

Ponti, Carlo

Combination hoodless graphoscope and stereoscope viewer

Item is a wooden pedestal Holmes style stereoscope. Hood of stereoscope is made of cardboard and adorned with a golden leaf pattern around the edges. Graphoscope is a viewing device used to enlarge photographs and text. Item is a made of a magnifying glass in a wooden frame and can collapse into a compact form.This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. This object can collapse into a compact form.

Wooden pedestal stereoscope viewer

Item is a wooden Holmes style stereoscope attached to a pedestal. Stereoscope viewer is made of cardboard and lined with velvet. Viewer is able to bend at the base.This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Holmes style stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden pedestal Holmes style stereoscope. The viewer can bend at the base. Hood of viewer has small metal balls decorating the edges. This item was used to view stereographs. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Holmes stereoscope viewer

Item is a Holmes stereoscope with a detachable pedestal made to be a handheld stereoscope or standing stereoscope.Originally designed by Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894), the Holmes stereoscope became the prototype for all stereoscopes of the 19th century. His passion for stereoscope technological possibilities became a significant factor in their widespread distributionThis object was often used for entertainment or education. The sterescope was built with a sliding card holder and hood to protect eyes from additional light. Next, two nearly identical images would be mounted and placed in the holder in front of the viewer. Then the images would be looked at through the viewer and merge together to mimic a three-dimensional object. This image was often referred to as a stereograph.

Holmes, Oliver Wendell

Combination graphoscope and stereoscope viewer (Nelson Wood & Company)

Item is a wooden and metal combination graphoscope and stereoscope. Glass is framed by detailed floral carving. Body is able to fold onto itself and stand on a floral engraved stand. Graphoscope is a viewing device used to enlarge photographs and text. Item is a made of a magnifying glass in a wooden frame and can collapse into a compact form. Whereas the Stereoscope was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Revolving stereoscope viewer (Alex Beckers)

Item is a mahogany table top viewer adorned with doric style pillars. Item has two binocular style viewers on opposing ends. The optical rear eyepiece allows for back to back slide mountings. Inside the object is a revolving metal belt that can be turned by the circular handle on the outside of the viewer. The revolving belt can hold a minimum of 30 stereographs. Within the viewer are 10 stereographs made of glass, tissue and paper with themes ranging from landmarks, landscapes, portraits, and interior decor. Written on item: Alex Beckers New York Patent April 7 1857; March 1 & 29 1859; April 12 1859; Dec. 12 1859.

Revolving stereoscope viewer (A. Mattey)

Item is a wooden tabletop stereoscope with binocular viewer made with 50 built in glass stereographs of landscapes from Quebec and Montreal, factories and vernacular photography. Top of the stereoscope can open for additional light. Inside the object is a revolving metal belt (patented by Alexander Beckers) holding the stereographs that can be turned by the circular handles on the outside of the viewer.

Written on object: 76/Unis-France Stereoscopes Mattey-Paris/3.

46B visual survey telebinocular

Item is a 46B Visual Survey Telebinocular used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Item is metal with a plastic eye piece. A lamp bulb is installed and attached to a power cable. Lamp bulb illuminates backs of stereographs or transparencies when viewed through the eye piece. Patent No. 2557608 made by Keystone View Company. Comes with 4 stereographs made by various photographers and studios such as G.W. Wilson, Underwood & Underwood and B.W Kilburn.

Mousetrap camera [replica]

Item is a small, wooden camera obscura with a single meniskus lens to demonstrate function of matt glass focusing screen and focal length. It is a replica built in the style of the small "mousetrap" cameras designed by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid 1830's. They were simple wooden boxes with a single lens used to expose paper negatives, sensitized by silver nitrate (the calotype or Talbotype process). Exposures often took hours, and Talbot had several of the cameras made by a local joiner near his country home in Laycock, Wiltshire.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

ICA Lloyd 575 folding camera

Item is a camera produced by ICA with a Carl Zeisa lens. The camera uses [xfilm], has [X] lenses, [X] shutter speed of [X]. Item also comes with a leather case.

Zeiss Super Ikonta C (folding camera)

Item is a folding camera for use with Zeiss Ikon B2 6x9cm 120 roll film. The camera includes a Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f3.5, 105mm lens and Compur rapid shutter with speeds from 1 second to 1/400, plus bulb setting.

Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash

Item is a brown moulded plastic box camera designed by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey Jr. for use with 127 film (4x6 cm exposures). The camera features a fixed speed rotary shutter and plastic lens. Item does not include the flash unit. This model was made in Canada, at the Canadian Kodak plant in Toronto.

Praktica FX3

Item is an 35mm reflex camera with a waist-level viewfinder and a non auto-return mirror. Manufactured in Soviet controlled East Germany, the company and the Desden factory closed after reunification. The lens is a Meyer Gorlitz Domiplan 1:2.8/50mm.

Salyut Kiev 88C

Item is a medium format, single lens reflex replica of the Swedish Hasselblad 1600 F camera manufactured in Russia. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Shutter is a foil focal plane style. Camera kit includes 2 film backs, an eye level viewfinder and 80 mm 2.8 lens.

Kalimar Reflex

Item is a single lens reflex camera 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 roll film. Made by Fujita Optical Company for Kalimar (in the USA), the cloth focal plane shutter allows exposures from B to 1/500 sec. Film counter set manually at the first exposure (start at arrow on film back) Sports style viewfinder on viewer shaft.

Exakta Varex 500

Item is a postwar model camera, made in occupied East Germany. is possibly a variant of the VX 500 , but not exactly like it. The prism can be removed, shutter speeds are B, Flash, 1/30 to 1/500 sec, double flash sync contact at left side, lens is West German Schneider Zreuznach Xenon 50mm f1.9.

Ikoflex II camera

Item is a medium format twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format roll film, produced by Zeiss Ikon. Model number 252/16 stamped underneath. Lens is a Triotar 75mm, f3.5 with a compur 1 to 1/300 shutter.

Rolleiflex Grey Baby

Item is a knob-advance twin lens reflex camera for 4 x 4 cm exposures on 127 format film. More compact than other twin lens reflex cameras, with a smaller negatives, the Grey Body has a Xenar f3.5 lens with a Syncrho compur shutter. The camera comes in a gray leather case and is equipped with an ultra violet Waltz filter and a lens hood.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Rolleicord Model 1

Item is an inexpensive version of the classic Rolleiflex medium format, twin lens reflex camera with fewer features. Shot 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 film; adapters could be obtained to shoot with 35mm and sheet film. The lens is a Zeiss Triotar f 3.8, 7.5cm with a 28.5 filter screw mount.

Foth-Flex II

Item is a medium format, twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Lens is an Anistigmant 75mm, F2.5 with a cloth focal plane shutter (speeds from 2 second to 1/500th). This model of camera was available in both left and right-handed models.

Ikoflex III camera

Item is a medium format twin lens reflex camera manufactured by Zeiss Ikon. this is the last pre-war Ikoflex model, released in June of 1939 and made in Stuttgart, Germany. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format roll film. The focusing screen has a condenser, magnifier for focusing and an “albada” finder (sports finder) in the hood. The viewing lens is an f3.5, 7.5 cm Teronar Anastigmat, lower lens is a Triotar f 3.5, 7.5 cm, Carl Zeiss Jena. Shutter is a Zeiss Ikon Compur Rapid, with speeds of 1 - 1/400 second and Bulb. Model number "853/16" is stamped under the lens assembly. Inside the viewfinder is a chart for seasonal exposure times.

Yashica LM

Item is a typical medium format twin lens reflex camera, designed to resemble a Rolleiflex. The "LM", for light meter, indicates that this model has a selenium cell exposure meter on top, with meter control on left side. Shutter: Copal MX. 80mm f3.5 Yashicor Lens.

Yashica Co. Ltd.

Mamiya c330

Item is a twin lens reflex medium format camera. Features on this model include a self-cocking winding crank with double exposure prevention.

Kodak Six-20 Camera

Item is a folding camera with an enameled art-deco sides. The camera uses 620 film for 2.25" 3.25" exposures. The camera also has a fold down metal strut to support self-erecting front. The lens on the camera is a Kodak Anastigmat f6.3.

35mm cameras

Series contains cameras designed for use with standard 35mm (135 format) film. This became the most popular film and camera format, both among professionals and amateurs. Sturdy and multi-functional, with interchangeable lenses, these cameras found their way into civil wars, riots, and natural disasters around the necks of daring photojournalists as well as in homes and on vacation with advanced amateurs and photo-enthusiasts. Once exposed, the film was wound conveniently back into light-tight metal canisters that would protect the film until it could be developed.

For 35mm cameras marketed specifically to amateur photographers, see items in the Point-and-Shoot series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Leica iif

Item is a small, hand-held metal camera with black vulcanite cover on body. Summitar lens (f=5cm), strap and lens cap included.

Leica R4

Item is a small hand held 35mm camera with metal and black vulcanite case. Two large metal rings attached on either side for a strap (not included). No lens included.

Yashica Minimatic - EL

Item is a 35 mm camera with a split image rangefinder and automatic exposure camera. A signal appears in the viewfinder if the film will be overexposed and the shutter cannot be released. Lens is a Yashinon - DX, f1.7, 45 mm.

Kodak Retina Ia

Item is a manual focus, folding 35mm camera with Synchro-Compur lens. Made in Germany. An instruction book is included. Made in Germany at Kodak AG.

Baldamatic

Item is a 35mm camera with rapid-wind key on base. It has a coupled selenium light meter. Lens is a Baldanar F2.8 45mm with a Prontomat shutter. Automatic exposure is regulated with shutter speeds from 1/30th - 1/300th of a second.

Balda-Werk

Contaflex II

Item is a 35mm, single lens reflex camera manufactured by the Zeiss Ikon Company. This model, introduced in 1954, has a Tessar 45mm f2.8 lens and synchro-compur leaf shutter. The camera has a built-in, uncoupled selenium exposure meter and a telephoto lens attachment that slides over the original lens (Teleskop 1.7 x NR 2507248).

Canadian perspectives: a national conference on Canadian photography

Fonds contains the audio recordings, slides and transcript publication related to the conference on Canadian photography, hosted by Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Photographic Arts Department, Toronto, in 1979. 23 presentations were recorded, with the categories: "Canadian Photography-Historical Perspectives", "Regional Overviews of Contemporary Canadian Photography", "Support Systems", and "Studying Photography". Includes the transcripts of a panel discussion and question periods which followed 11 presentations. Contributors include: Rudolf Arnheim, R.J. Huyda, Stanley S. Triggs, Donald Gillies, Ann Thomas,Chris Youngs, David MacKenzie, Katherine Tweedie, Penny Cousineau, Doug Clark, Tom Gore, Claudie Beck, Patrick Close, Millie McKibbon, Andrew Birrell, Paul Couvrette, Darryl Williams, Hu Hohn, David Robinson, Alain Desvergnes, John Ward, Geoffrey James, Bob Scott, Phyllis Lambert, Andrew Gruft, Ann Pearson, Michael Brower, Alain Clavet, Namia Aer, Isaac Applebaum, Pat Fleisher, Gail Fisher-Taylor, David Hlynsky, Jorge Guerra, Valerie Burton, Alex Giannellia, Michael Schreier, Frances Johnston, Bill Aeler, David McMillan, Ted Hunt, Jim Borcoman, Charles Gagnon, David Heath, Phil Bergerson.

Image Arts

Canadian Perspectives Conference Transcript

  • 2012.006.05.31
  • Item
  • October 1979

Item consists on one published transcript of the proceedings of the Canadian perspectives conference conference on Canadian photography.

Polyorama style stereoscope viewer with stand (Murray and Heath)

Item is a wooden polyorama style stereoscope with a detachable brass stand made to be a handheld stereoscope or standing stereoscope. There is a glass stereograph of a park view inside the stereoscope. Item comes with 3 prize ribbons for "Best in Category" at the National Stereoscopic Association Photography Shows. Lenses in viewer slide out to the side for cleaning, Reflecting lid is fitted with a convex mrror. Written on base of stand: 34 Picadilly London Registered Feb 1858

Photograph & Film Technology Collection

  • 2005.005
  • Collection
  • 1880 - 2008

This collection consists of photographic films, papers and chemicals used by various individuals for amateur or professional purposes. The collection also includes camera accessories, flash equipment, various lenses, exposure meters (light meters) and equpiment used for darkroom processing and printing. This is a growing collection, created to help preserve the materials used for analogue photographic developing, printing and enlarging.

Man behind camera with boy

Item consists of a board, landscape poster featuring an image of a man and a boy standing in front of a tent and behind a camera. The man is covered by the camera blanket as he prepares his photograph, while the boy stands behind, holding a plate holder.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Ricohmatic 225

Item is a Ricohmatic 225 in case. It is a 6x6 twin lens reflex camera made in Japan by Ricoh from 1959 to 1962. It is a synthesis of all the best technologies of the time. Used no. 120 film, but an optional kit was available to allow for the use of 135 films. Features an uncoupled selenium light meter, EVS numbering system with two ranges, Ricoh Viewer f 3.2/80mm lens/viewer, Seikosha SLV shutter with speeds 1-1/500 sec + B, aperture of 1/3.5 to 1/22, manual focusing, and crank film advance.

Eumig C3R 8mm camera

Item is a double 8 cine camera taking 25' spools, optical eye-level finder and spring motor with Reichert Solar f1.9/12.5 mm. This item was produced in the late 1950's and is accompanied by a leather bag, original user's manual and orange lens filter. Written in the small pocket of the bag : Alfred Silverman, 44 Barclay RD, Downsview, Ont. Small knob on the back used to record.

Kodak Lecture Series and Image Arts Lectures

  • 2012.006
  • Collection
  • 1973-2007

Commencing in 1973, the Kodak Lecture Series Fonds contains audio and video recordings of lectures presenting the work of photographers, filmmakers, photo-based and new media artists, curators and visual media theorists.
A series of lectures at the School of Image Arts (then known as the Photographic Arts Department) was begun by professor Phil Bergerson in 1975 to support the school's unique curriculum. Bergerson wanted to expose his students to new artists and ideas around photography by inviting internationally known artists, curators and theorists to discuss the art of creating, collecting and curating photography. These lectures were financially supported by Ontario Arts Council Grants and ticket sales. The first series (Photographic Perspectives) was extreamly popular, and Bergerson continued to organize the lectures for the next 9 years.
Kodak Canada Inc. stepped in to sponsor the series in 1984, allowing students and the photographic comminity of Toronto to attend all lectures in the series without charge. The series was re-named the Kodak Chair Lecture series (1986-2007), and motion picture and, over time, video and new media artists and theorists joined the line-up of speakers.
Throughout the series, the lectures were documented, on audiocassette and then video tape. In 2009, the lectures began to be streamed online and archived on the RyeCast websites (https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/1/page/Channels.aspx). In 2002, the School of Image Arts received funding from the Canada's Digital Collections (CDC) program, through Industry Canada, to create an online multi-media database of over 200 of the participants, using images and footage captured during the lectures. The project, entitled "Images and Ideas: 25 Years of the Kodak Lecture Series", was completed in 2002 and hosted on the Library and Archives Canada server, along with thousands of other local and national digital projects. The Canada's Digital Collections website is no longer live, but is archived at the Government of Canada website: http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ic/cdc/E/Alphabet.asp
In addition to the Kodak Lectures, the fonds contains the audio recordings of the proceedings of the Canadian Perspectives Conference (1979), a Critique Workshop with Gary Winnogrand (1981), a Critical Writing Workshop with A. D..Coleman (1982), the proceedings of the August Sander Symposium (1982) and the Symposium on Photographic Theory (1983).

Ryerson Image Centre

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