North and Central America

Taxonomy

Code

1000001 Map of North and Central America

Scope note(s)

  • Within the logic of TGN,

Source note(s)

  • Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Equivalent terms

North and Central America

  • UF North America
  • UF Central America

Associated terms

North and Central America

50 Archival description results for North and Central America

Analyst Super 8

Item is a motion picture camera with black plastic body. In original box (opened) with manual folded inside. Used Kodak Super 8 film cartridge and was powered by 4 AA batteries (removed). Comes with Kodak Zoom lens f1.9 (13-28mm). Large red bulb on front.

Eastman Kodak Company

Automatic 8

Item is a small hand held movie camera in grey bakelite body with Kodak Ektanar Lens f1.6 (13mm). In brown leather carrying case with strap, inside original yellow box packaging (opened) with manual. Made for use with 8mm film.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Bell & Howell 240 Electric Eye camera outfit

Item consists of a Bell & Howell 240 motion picture camera. It is in a hard leather case also containing the manual and the case key. The camera uses 16mm film, has automatic exposure control, a 20mm lens, a self threading mechanism, has 32-fott film run and rapid winding crank, a reserve power indicator, and accepts a cable release.

Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two

Item consists of a Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two motion picture camera. It takes 8mm film, and has a Bell & Howell Super-Comat 10mm f/2.3 lens. There is a dial on the front of the camera to select aperture, light settings, and black & white or colour. It has a two-toned brown body and a winding knob on the side.

Brownie 8mm Movie Camera II

Item is a Brownie 8mm Camera II, It has a beige body with pop up frame finder on top. Side comes off to insert film spools. "Brownie movie camera T.M. Reg. Can. Pat. Off." Lens is "Kodak Series IV Adapter Ring No. 43 Made in U.S.A." f/2.7 lens. Settings for Bright Sun, Hazy Sun, Cloudy Bright and Open Shade.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3. It is an 8mm wind-up spool-film camera. It has a flip-up bombsite viewfinder, an f/2.3 lens with a photocell, and originally retailed for $74.50.

Brownie Movie Camera Turret f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Movie Camera Turret f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera for double run 8mm film with 25 feet load, made in Canada. The three lenses are on a rotating turret offering 13mm, 24mm, and 9mm wide angle options.

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 25

Item is black leather covered metal body video camera with a Newton finder in the handle. The object uses a spring motor at 16 fps and has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm lens with a fixed focus f2.7.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera. The camera was patented by Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, and was made by Canadian Kodak Co. Limited. It has a Kodak Ektanar Lens 13m f/2.3 and is made of plastic. It used 8mm film and was sold for 19.99 when released in 1963.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera. The camera was patented by Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, and was made by Canadian Kodak Co. Limited. It has a Kodak Ektanar Lens 13m f/2.3 and is made of plastic. It used 8mm film and was sold for 19.99 when released in 1963.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Keystone 16mm Film movie camera, model 7

Item consists of a 16mm motion picture camera, Model 7 made by Keystone Manufacturing Company in Boston Massachusetts in 1937. The company was an American manufacturer known for movie cameras with built-in electronic flash in the 1930s. The camera features a summer exposure guide on the front and has a Switar 1:1.8 f=16mm lens.

Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3 with electric-eye control. It is in it's original packaging with the manual. It comes with a built-in exposure meter and was made to use 50 foot rolls of 13mm Kodachrome Color Movie Film. It has a 13mm standard built-in lens. Can be used with converter lenses or various filters.

Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera that uses double 8mm film and has a lens turret featuring a Kodak Normal Ektanar 13mm f/1.9 lens, a Kodak Wide Angle Ektanar 6.5mm f/1.9 lens, and a Kodak Telephoto Ektanar 24mm f/1.9 lens.

Kodak Cine Camera Scopemeter Turret f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Camera Scopemeter Turret f/1.9. Most models would feature a 6.5mm, a 13mm, and a 24mm rotating turret lens. It originally retailed for $59.50. A switch on the front of the camera allows the user to choose between Type A Filter, No Filter, or a Skylight Filter.

Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera. It was manufactured from 1961 to 1967. It is an 8mm camera with a P. Angenieux Paris f.6.5-52mm 1:1.8 Angenieux-Zoom lens with original lens cap. It used a clockwork motor and shot 25 feet rolls of 8mm film at 16 frames per second. Some paint is beginning to peel. When the camera was first released it cost approximately $139.95, about $900 today.

Kodak Instamatic M14

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M14 compact motion picture camera. It was used with silent Super 8 film cartridges and has a 14mm f/2.7 Kodak Ektanar Lens. There is the option to attach a pistol grip for easier hand-held filming.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak Instamatic M2

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M2 super 8 film motion picture camera. It was one of the first Instamatic movie cameras and was released the same year that Kodak launched the super 8 format and cartridge-loading Kodachrome II Film. The Instamatic M2 had a fixed movie speed of 18 exposures per second, featured a Kodak Ektanar lens with f-stops 2.2 to 23 and was made of grey and black plastic and metal parts. On the battery slot cover, Kodak added five illustrations of how to choose the correct aperture based on the weather for Kodachrome II film.

Kodak Instamatic M26

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M26. It is a motion picture camera that uses a silent super 8 film cartridge and has a Kodak Ektanar 13mm f/1.8 lens. It has a 28.5mm filter, fixed focus, an under-exposure warning signal that shows in the viewfinder, auto exposure control, 18 frames per second film speed, and a cable release socket. It is the same as the Kodak Instamatic M24, but features a different lens.

Kodak Instamatic M4

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M4. It is a super 8 film cartridge camera that was released at the same time as the Instamatic M2, and M6, as well as the projectors Instamatic M50, M70, M80, M90 and M100 when Kodak first launched the Super 8 mm film format. Super 8mm film was the same as standard 8mm film, but was loaded into a plastic cartridge that could contain 50 feet of film. The image area of Super 8 film was 50% larger than standard 8mm because of a new design of picture vs. sprocket hole, and the cartridge format allowed for movie cameras to become easy enough for anyone to use.

Kodak Instamatic M9

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M9 movie camera. It is an 8mm camera with an attached folding pistol grip. The body is brown and made of metal and plastic. It has a f/1.8 9.5-45mm Kodak Zoom Lens.

Kodak XL 362 movie outfit

Item consists of a Kodak XL 362 movie outfit, including camera, 4 AA--size batteries, wrist strap, and eye cup. Originally also included a super 8 cartridge of Kodak type G Ektachrome 160 movie film.

Kodak XL 55

Introduced by Kodak in 1971, XL (eXisting Light) was incorporated with Super 8 to use their new High Speed Ektachrome Super 8 colour film and was designed to be able to film in as low light conditions as possible. The lens aperture is F1.2 compared to the super 8 normal of F1.8 and the film intermittent mechanism film pulldown speed was increased to allow a shutter open angle of 230 degrees compared to a typical 160 degrees previously. No light was diverted away from the film for a reflex viewfinder or TTL metering. The Kodak XL cameras had a unique "binocular" shape allowing easy two handed shooting.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak XL330

Item consists of a Kodak XL 330. It is a silent super 8 motion picture camera with a Kodak Ektar f/1.2 9mm lens and fixed focus. It has an adjustable eyepiece, a filming speed of 18 frames per second, a film counter, a battery check button and a tripod socket. It works with 4 AA batteries.

Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Model I

Item consists of a Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Camera Automatic. It is a motion picture camera that shot 25 ft reels of silent Regular 8mm film at 16 frames per second. It used a clockwork motor that required winding about every 40 seconds. It allowed for about 2 minutes of filming before the reel would need to be flipped so that the other side of the film could be exposed. When released in 1960, the Zoom 8 Reflex retailed for $190.

Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Model II

Item consists of a Kodak Zoom 8 Reflex Camera Model II. It has a Kodak Zoom Ektanar Lens f/1.6 and used 8mm film. It was released the same year as the previous model, in 1960.

Univex Model A8

Item is a die-cast metal cine camera with a black finish. It has an interchangeable f5.6 Ilex Univar lens and a collapsible viewfinder. The camcorder uses Univex 30' patented spools of Single-8 film.