North and Central America

Taxonomy

Code

1000001 Map of North and Central America

Scope note(s)

  • Within the logic of TGN,

Source note(s)

  • Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Equivalent terms

North and Central America

  • UF North America
  • UF Central America

Associated terms

North and Central America

547 Archival description results for North and Central America

1 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

2 Darkroom lights

Item consists of two darkroom lights. Each has a wooden base holding a metal cylinder that surrounds a darkroom bulb. The power cord is thread through the wooden base to connect to the bulb. Only one still has a bulb. The inside of both metal cylinders has been painted white.

Image Arts

Adlake Regular

Item is a manual plate changing box-style camera. It holds 12 steel plateholders inside the top door compartment behind the plane of focus. Holders have to be manually inserted into a slot. The camera has an achromatic lens with three diaphragm stops, two viewfinders, an aperture scale from f16 to 45, and a time and instantaneous shutter.

Allied Mini camera

Item is a roll of film in plastic casing, designed to be used as a camera. The camera comes in its original packaging, opened. ASA 100.

Analyst Super 8

Item is a motion picture camera with black plastic body. In original box (opened) with manual folded inside. Used Kodak Super 8 film cartridge and was powered by 4 AA batteries (removed). Comes with Kodak Zoom lens f1.9 (13-28mm). Large red bulb on front.

Eastman Kodak Company

Ansco Cadet

Item is an Ansco Cadet 127 roll film camera. The design of this camera was made to compete with the Kodak Brownie Star series, including similar three-point flash contacts. The camera features an Anscar Lens and a dial to switch between black and white and colour. The body is black plastic.

Ansco Clipper

Item is an Ansco Clipper 4.5 x 6 xm rollfilm camera. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with a black body and expandable lens board.

Ansco Memo

Item is a leather covered wooden box camera. The Ansco Memo is a single frame, fixed focus which takes landscape oriented images. Film is advanced by pushing down on a lever in the back of the camera. While not the first American camera made for 35mm film, it is the first to sell in abundant quantities.

Ansco Shur-Flash

Item is an inexpensive box camera made of fiberboard and covered with imitation leather. The camera has a Gallileo-type viewfinder only (no brilliant viewfinder), flash contacts, and a single speed shutter that is fast enough to accommodate bulb flashes. It used 120 size roll film.

Ansco Vest Pocket No.0

Item is a small, folding strut camera for making 4 x 6.5cm exposures on 127 film. Unlike folding bed cameras, the lens remains exposed (on the outside of the camera) when the camera is collapsed. Lens is an Ansco Anastigmat f6.3.

Anscoflex

Item is an all-metal camera designed by Raymond Loewy for 6 x 6 cm (2.36" x 2.36") exposures on 620 film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder, it is a simple box camera design with a two element Meniscus F11 lens and fixed 1/60th shutter speed. The front panel slides up to reveal the lens and viewfinder.

Argoflex E

Item consists of an Argus Argoflex E twin-lens reflex camera made in the U.S.A. It was the first 620 film TLR camera produced by Argus. The camera features gear-coupled lenses allowing the user to focus using the viewfinder, an f4.5/75mm Argus Varex Anastigmat lens, and an Argus Varex Shutter with speeds T, B, 200, 100, 50, 25 and 10. Exposures are 6x6. The body is made of black Bakelite.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Argus C3

Item is a 35mm camera. Very solid and durable design, similar to the box camera.

Argus film splicer

Small grey metal splicer for cutting and rejoining 8 mm film strips for at-home editing. Remnants of film strips were found in the splicer along with a crumpled piece of paper with instructions for use.

Argus Cameras of Canada Ltd.

Auto Graflex

Item consists of a single lens reflex Auto Graflex camera for 3.25 x 4.25" plates or film sheets. It has a disappearing Bausch & Lomb 166mm f/4.5 lens, a collapsible viewing hood and a cloth curtain New Simplified Focal Plane Shutter with speeds up to 1/1000 sec. It was made by the Folmer & Schwing Division of the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York from 1907-1923. Two other models of the same camera were made and sold at the same time, one for 4x5" plates and one for 5x7" plates.

Automatic 8

Item is a small hand held movie camera in grey bakelite body with Kodak Ektanar Lens f1.6 (13mm). In brown leather carrying case with strap, inside original yellow box packaging (opened) with manual. Made for use with 8mm film.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Bantam

Item is a compact camera built of black plastic with black leather bellows and metal clasps. It was made for use with 828 film and features a Kodak Anastigmat f6.3 53mm lens and a rigid viewfinder.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Bantam RF

Item is a small rangefinder camera made for use with 828 special 35mm paper backed roll film. It has a brown Bakelite body with metal and aluminum accents. It is equipped with a non-self-cocking Flash 300 shutter and 50mm f/3.9 Kodak Ektanon lens. It has an optical viewfinder with superimposed coupled rangefinder and a 3 element lens that is mildly radioactive. Equipped with Kodak Ektanon Lens.

Eastman Kodak Company

Bell & Howell 240 Electric Eye camera outfit

Item consists of a Bell & Howell 240 motion picture camera. It is in a hard leather case also containing the manual and the case key. The camera uses 16mm film, has automatic exposure control, a 20mm lens, a self threading mechanism, has 32-fott film run and rapid winding crank, a reserve power indicator, and accepts a cable release.

Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two

Item consists of a Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two motion picture camera. It takes 8mm film, and has a Bell & Howell Super-Comat 10mm f/2.3 lens. There is a dial on the front of the camera to select aperture, light settings, and black & white or colour. It has a two-toned brown body and a winding knob on the side.

Bosley B2

Item is a compact 35mm camera with coupled rangefinder and an Anastigmat F3.2/44 mm lens in a helical mount. It has a double exposure prevention mechanism.

Bolsey

Brownie 8mm Movie Camera II

Item is a Brownie 8mm Camera II, It has a beige body with pop up frame finder on top. Side comes off to insert film spools. "Brownie movie camera T.M. Reg. Can. Pat. Off." Lens is "Kodak Series IV Adapter Ring No. 43 Made in U.S.A." f/2.7 lens. Settings for Bright Sun, Hazy Sun, Cloudy Bright and Open Shade.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Automatic Movie Camera f/2.3. It is an 8mm wind-up spool-film camera. It has a flip-up bombsite viewfinder, an f/2.3 lens with a photocell, and originally retailed for $74.50.

Brownie Bullet Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Bullet Camera. It is an eyelevel 127 roll film camera that was modeled as an upscale version of the Brownie Holiday. Other cameras with identical designs but different names include the Brownie Chiquita Camera and the Camera Brownie Chiquita. It is made of Bakelite, and has a Dakon lens and a rotary shutter. In original card box with manual.

Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Brownie Hawkeye flash model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Brownie Movie Camera Turret f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Movie Camera Turret f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera for double run 8mm film with 25 feet load, made in Canada. The three lenses are on a rotating turret offering 13mm, 24mm, and 9mm wide angle options.

Brownie No. 2 Model F

Item is Brownie No. 2 Model F box camera that used 120 film to make pictures 5.7 x 8.25 cm in size. It has a leatherette covered aluminum body and a simple lens with 3 aperture settings and a rotary shutter.

Brownie No. 2A Model B

Item consists of a Kodak No. 2-A Brownie Model B box roll film camera. It used size 116 film and made a picture 6.4x10.8cm. The camera has a leatherette covered card body, a metal film carrier, and two reflecting finders. Case can be removed for loading by releasing 2 pivoted catches and pulling out the winding key. Patented by Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York and manufactured by the Canadian Kodak Company Limited in Toronto, Ontario.

Brownie No. 2C Model A

Item consists of a Kodak No. 2-C Brownie Model A box camera. The camera used 130 roll film for an image size of 5.715 x 10.795 cm. It has a standard Meniscus achromatic lens and a rotary shutter.

Brownie Reflex Synchro Model

Item is a small Bakelite camera for 127 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder and cannot be used for focusing, it is a simple box camera design.

Brownie StarFlash

Item consists of a red Kodak Brownie StarFlash camera. It was manufactured by the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited in Toronto Ontario, and produces 4x4cm images on 127 film. It has a plastic body and built in flash.

Brownie Super 27

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Super 27 viewfinder camera. The camera uses 127 roll film, has a Kodar f/8 lens with two stops, sunny, f/13.5 and cl'dy br't/flash f/8. A knob on the front of the lens allows for a choice of focus zones, close-up or beyond 6ft. The choice between two shutter speeds is made by opening the flash door, for a speed of 1/40, or closing it for a speed of 1/80. The body is moulded plastic featuring an optical direct vision finder and a flash gun for AG1 bulbs, concealed by a door beside the lens.

Brownie Target SIX-20

For 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. exposure on 620 film Acromatic lens, 2 aperture settings, rotary shutter. Metal and leatherette case. Case will not separate to open camera.

Brownie Target Six-16

Item consists of a Brownie Target Six-16 box roll film camera that used film sized 616 to make pictures sized 6.35 x 10.8 cm. It was made in Canada, and has a simple meniscus lens and a rotary shutter. The body is a metal box covered in black leatherette with two brilliant finders, and a vertical art-deco line design on the front panel.

Brownie Target Six-16

Item consists of a Brownie Target Six-16 box roll film camera that used film sized 616 to make pictures sized 6.35 x 10.8 cm. It was made in Canada, and has a simple meniscus lens and a rotary shutter. The body is a metal box covered in black leatherette with two brilliant finders, and a vertical art-deco line design on the front panel.

Brownie Target Six-20

Item is a small box camera with leatherette casing and metal faceplate. Camera is loaded with Kodak Verichrome 620 film.

Bullet Camera

Item is a mass produced Bakelite camera for 127 film format, designed for Kodak by Walter Dorwin Teague. Simple lens on helical extension tube, only one shutter speed. Collapsible frame viewfinder on top of camera. Red film counter window on back.

Canada's 125th Anniversary at Building #5 and Kodak PhotoCD

File contains two identical photographs featuring an image of a group of employees standing with a Canada flag outside in the parking lot of Building #5. A flag in the foreground indicates the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada. The third photograph features an image of the Kodak PhotoCD compact disc with PhotoCD Player and remote, likely taken for advertising purposes.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Canon Canonet 28

Item is the rangefinder model of the Canonet 28. It has a CDS (cadmium sulphide) cell above the lens which is a Canon F2.8 40 mm. It has a Canonlite D flash attached to the hot shoe mount.

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Cine-Kodak Duo Splicer outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Duo Spicer Outfit complete with film cement, containers, an envelope of mounting screws and strips of practice film, and splicer. Missing applicators. For 8mm and 16mm movies, buth sound and silent.

Image Arts

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 25

Item is black leather covered metal body video camera with a Newton finder in the handle. The object uses a spring motor at 16 fps and has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm lens with a fixed focus f2.7.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

DeVry QRS Model K-1

Item consists of a brick-shaped brown plastic camera. It creates 40 24 x 32 mm exposures on 35 mm film in special cassttes. The camera uses a Graf Anastigmat f7/7/40 mm lens with a single-speed shutter that trips by counterclockwise motion on the winding crank.

Dollar Box Camera

Item is a small strapless box camera with a single viewfinder that uses 127 film for 4x6.5cm exposures. Some versions are identified "Ansco Dollar Camera" on the front but this specific one only has "Ansco" on the front. This model also came in black, green, and red. The red version with a strap is known as the "Kiddie Camera".

Duaflex I

Item consists of a Kodak Duaflex I camera and a Kodak Duaflex flash-holder. Camera is black and silver with a Kodet lens. Uses 620 film. Tripod mount. Made in Toronto. 620 roll film pseudo twin-lens reflex. Flash-holder imported by the Canadian Kodak Co. Ltd. Toronto, for use with early Duaflex models I and II. Synchronized for SM and SF bulbs when the camera was set on "I". No. 5 and No. 25 bulbs could be used with the "B" setting.

Eastman Studio Scale

Item consists of an Eastman Studio Scale. It has a wooden base, a 6 piece weight set and a plaque that reads Avoirdupois Weight. It was used to facilitate the mixing of chemicals in a photographer's dark room.

Image Arts

Ektra 1

Item is a small camera with a rectagular body made of black plastic and a green #1 on the top. Made for use with 110 cartridge film, it is a basic camera with fixed focus and a flipflash connector. Made for the Canadian market, this camera is labelled in French and English, and reads "appareil Kodak EKTRA camera" in silver above the green #1.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Ektra 2

Item is a small camera with a rectagular body made of black plastic and a green #2 on the top. Made for use with 110 cartridge film, it is a basic camera with fixed focus and a flipflash connector. Made for the Canadian market, this camera is labelled in French and English, and reads "appareil Kodak EKTRA camera" in silver beside the green #2. The Ektra 2 is unique in that it features an exposure guide for different types of film printed on the base in white.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Ektralite 30

Item is a small rectangular camera with a black plastic body, flip out lens, and a 22mm f/5.6 lens. Made for the Canadian market, it reads "appareil Kodak EKTRALITE camera" beside a silver on green number "30".

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Ektralite 500

Item is a compact viewfinder camera with a built-in electronix flash, made for use with 110 cartridge film. Manufactured for the Canadian market, its nameplate reads: "appareil Kodak EKRALITE 500 camera". It features a hinged camera body that also serves as a camera grip. It has a Kodak Reomar 22mm kens and requires a 9 volt battery.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Electric view master stereoscope (model D)

Item is a brown handheld electric view master first manufactured by Swayer's Inc and first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). Once pressed down the lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Unlike previous view masters, this view master comes with a built in back light attached to an electrical cord. Once turned on the back light illuminates transparencies on view. Item is made of plastic and metal. Reel has 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of The Atlas of Human Anatomy, Head and Neck.

Empty photograph envelopes

Various photograph envelopes from Kodak in Montreal QC, Gurds Sports Hobbies in London ON, and Tamblyn Tel-Vision Prints in Toronto. Advertisements for Verichrome Safety film on Kodak envelopes. One envelope contains two prints of A.T. Orr, one with him and a group of friends, the other holding game after hunting.

Emulsion kettle

Item is a 48 gallon copper kettle with a silver-plated liner. It was installed in building #3 of the Kodak Heights plant in 1915 for making photographic emulsion for black and white paper and was used until 1974. The kettle was used to make the first photographic emulsion produced in Canada and was referred to as the "making kettle".

Kodak Canada Inc.

Expo Watch Camera

Item is a small novelty film camera that is disguised as a railroad pocket watch, first produced into early 1900's and sold until 1939. The exposure is made through the winding stem and the winding knob serves as a lens cap, and required special film cartridges. The camera is relatively common, as it was marketed for so long and several variations exist in the "Expo" trademark style, the winding knob, and the viewfinder shape. Black, red, blue enameled versions produced about 1935 are rarer.

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