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Recent advances in the deep frontier

Dr. Joe MacInnis, a physician and underwater researcher, discusses the recent advances in underwater research at a Nipissing University lecture. MacInnis begins with the discovery of the shipwrecks: the Titanic and the Atocha, and follows with the main part of the lecture, the discovery accomplished by his own team of Breadalbane shipwreck. Included are: a brief history of the ship, the efforts that went into the discovery, the difficulties of Arctic exploration as well as the benefits of cold water related to the state of preservation of the ship, and scientific discoveries that result from this type of expedition. The later part of the lecture explores new aspects of undersea research and future expeditions planned for Bermuda and the Canadian Great Lakes.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Komsomolets - cut 1 and cut 2

This recording is a documentary account of the survey conducted with the aid of the Mir submersibles of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets. The recording begins with an at sea memorial for sunken vessel. Next are shots of a map of the Komsomolets with certain areas marked in red, possibly where samplers and beacons will be left during the submarine dives to record radioactive leakage. Following this are dives to the sunken vessel in the Mir 1 and 2 submersibles. During the dives, Mir’s mechanical arms take parts and samples and leave samplers and other objects in and around the Komsomolets.
The K-278 Komsomolets, a Soviet nuclear submarine, was launched May 9, 1983 and was lost April 7, 1989 in northern Europe in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine had an operating depth of 1000 meters and was designed with the ability to dive to 1500 meters. Aboard the vessel were torpedoes including two nuclear warheads. The submarine’s demise was caused by a fire; it sank to a depth of around 1500 meters. There were 25 survivors and 42 fatalities. The controversy surrounding the loss of this vessel has to do with radioactive contamination from the nuclear reactor and nuclear torpedoes. Leakage could potentially contaminate drinking water, affect fish population and the ecology. Several expeditions to the Komsomolets have been undertaken to probe the area. Although earlier tests showed no signs of dangerous leakage, later tests revealed this was not so. The Komsomolets has since been buried in mud to seal fractures and contain radioactive leakage.

MacInnis, Joseph B.