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Reeks Photography--History
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Early cameras

This series consists of original and duplicate early cameras from the beginning of the history of photography. Based on the basic design of the camera obscura and produced between about 1820 and 1870, these simple devices were usually solid or sliding box cameras with uncomplicated lenses. The shutter was normally outside of the lens, in the form of a lens cap that was simple removed and replaced for exposure, or a rotating metal plate on the front of the lens, which held the aperture. These cameras mainly predated dry plate and flexible film photography, and were used to take Daguerreotype, wet-plate and salted paper photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Dry plate cameras

This series contains cameras designed for use with commercially manufactured dry plate negatives. Produced between about 1880 and 1900, these cameras began to be marketed to amateur photographers due to the relative ease of using dry plates. Exposure times shortened, necessitating faster shutters, within the lens or camera. The equipment also became more compact, allowing for hand-held photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Box and snapshot roll film cameras

Series contains simple, snapshot cameras designed for mass public consumption, taking advantage of the new flexible roll film that was developed in 1883. The box camera was a logical follow up from the original simple camera obscuras, often having only one shutter speed, simple lenses with minimal f-stop capabilities and manual winds.

The trend arguably began with George Eastman's in 1888 with the first, amateur, handheld camera, "The Kodak", which came pre-loaded with 100 exposures. After exposure, the entire outfit was returned to the Eastman Kodak company, where the film was developed, prints made and sent back to the customer with the camera, now re-loaded with more film.

Many millions of similar cameras were sold, both high and low end, manufactured by different companies and eventually developing into the modern point-and-shoot camera.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Detective cameras

Items in this series are photographic devices designed to be inconspicuous, intended for photographers to make candid exposures without the subject being aware. The first detective cameras appeared with the production of commercially available dry plates and designs were simple box camera style constructions. These were, in fact, very similar to standard cameras of the time, but were smaller, handheld and able to make exposures relatively quickly. As smaller, flexible film materials became available, these cameras began to be produced disguised as objects such as pocket watches, ties, books, hats, pens and walking sticks.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Scovill & Adams Company

Panoramic cameras

Series contains cameras designed to take wide-angle photographs (images that are least twice as wide as they are tall). Cameras of this nature began to be produced soon after photography was invented, as photographers have always wanted to capture large group portraits, landscape views and skylines. Panoramic photographs are achieved by stitching several exposures together to create one image or with purpose built cameras of several designed, including banquet (similar to standard cameras with wider aspect ratios, designed to take photographs of large groups indoors), short rotation (uses a curved film plane, swinging lens and split shutter that the lens rotates around), and full or long rotation (capable of producing 360 degree views by rotating the camera and film past the shutter).

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Miniature and sub-miniature cameras

This series contains cameras designed to take photographs on flexible film sized smaller than 135 format film (24mm x 36mm). The size of the camera also tended to be very small, and often simply designed. While several companies manufactured high quality miniature cameras (including Minox and Rollei), many others were cheaply made and did not produce relatively poor results.

Film formats for miniature cameras were often priority, created by manufactures for their cameras specifically, and included the following sizes: 10mm x 14xx (16mm film), 13mm x 17mm film (110 film cartridges), 14mm x 14mm (used by "Hit" type cameras), 8mm x 11mm cartridge roll film (Minox), 11mm x 8mm disc film (Kodak).

Miniature cameras gained a reputation as "spy" cameras, and while some of the higher quality ones (including the Minox) were used by government agencies, most were simply for surreptitious, amateur use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Professional and press cameras

Series contains cameras designed to fulfill specific, professional functions such as surveying, aerial photography, studio portraits and press work. These cameras are often the best items in the manufacturers line, offering more features and a sturdier construction than their amateur counterparts.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Stereoscopic and multi lens cameras

Series contains cameras that have with more than one lens, to create multiple images on the same light sensitive film or plate. These cameras were designed for several purposes, the most popular being the stereoscopic, or three-dimensional, image. Most stereo cameras work by taking two simultaneous images from slightly varying points of view that correspond to the distance between the human eyes. The images are then mounted side-by-side and viewed through a stereoscope (a system of two lenses that helps to converge the two photographs, to mimic the depth perception of binocular vision). Other three-dimensional cameras used four or more lenses to create images for lenticular prints.
Some multi-lens cameras were intended to create multiple copies of the same scene at one time, such as the gem tintype camera and passport camera, while others had shutters that took sequential shots to create images which show the passage of time on one frame.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Single lens reflex cameras

Series contains single lens reflex, or simply reflex, cameras. This deign used a mirror at a 45 degree angle to allow the photographer to look through the lens when composing the photograph, therefore seeing exactly what will appear on the film. Brilliant and sports style viewfinders only alllowed an approximation of the image alignment.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Twin lens reflex cameras

Series contains cameras designed with two identical lenses, mounted one above the other, for composition and the other for exposure. The twin-lens design allows the photographer a continuous view of the subject while photographing, as the 45 degree angled mirror is mounted to the viewing lens only and therefore does not have to list out of the way during exposure, as in single lens reflex designs. Most designs used a waist level viewfinder with a ground glass.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

35mm cameras

Series contains cameras designed for use with standard 35mm (135 format) film. This became the most popular film and camera format, both among professionals and amateurs. Sturdy and multi-functional, with interchangeable lenses, these cameras found their way into civil wars, riots, and natural disasters around the necks of daring photojournalists as well as in homes and on vacation with advanced amateurs and photo-enthusiasts. Once exposed, the film was wound conveniently back into light-tight metal canisters that would protect the film until it could be developed.

For 35mm cameras marketed specifically to amateur photographers, see items in the Point-and-Shoot series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

In-camera processing (instant) cameras

Series consists of cameras that combine exposure and development in one step to create photographs instantaneously.
While Polaroid is by far the most well known of these cameras, the first patent for instant photography was for the Dubroni, a French wet plate camera, designed so that the glass plate could be sensitized and developed by pouring the chemicals over the plate through a tube in the camera. Later cameras were developed so small tintypes (1895) and direct paper positives (1913) could be made quickly for tourists on busy streets.
But it was the Polaroid Corporation that made instant photography a household item, beginning in 1937 when Edwin Land's young daughter's desire to see her photograph immediately, inspired him to develop the Polaroid's first instant camera: the Land Camera.

The Heritage Collection also contains Kodak Instant Cameras; produced in the late 1970's, they spawned a patent infringement lawsuit from the Polaroid corporation that resulted in the recall all of instant Kodak models sold and the discontinuation of their production.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Source: <a href="http://www.shutterbug.com/content/it%E2%80%99s-instant%E2%80%94-it%E2%80%99s-not-polaroid-pre-and-post-polaroids-1864-1976">Wade, John. "It's Instant - But It's Not Polaroid: Pre- And-PostPolaroids, From 1864 to 1976." Shutterbug : Published May 1, 2012.</a>

Point and shoot cameras

Series contains mainly inexpensive, fully automatic 35 mm cameras marketed strictly for amateur use. These cameras are the high tech descendants of the box camera and most models have no manual control over focus, aperture, shutter speed, film winding or metering. The viewfinder on point and shoot models is, like the box camera and unlike reflex style cameras, not integrated with the lens; there is no mirror directing the view from the lens to the eye of the photographer. Most of the point and shoot cameras require batteries for operation.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

One-time use cameras

Series contains cameras designed to be disposable. Usually simple, point and shoot cameras made of plastic cases with cardboard housings, these cameras were sold pre-loaded with film and returned to the photofinisher in tact for development. The plastic bodies were often returned to the manufacturer and re-used, with film and housing. Cameras such as this were marketed for travel, weddings, underwater or other situations where a more expensive camera may get damaged. They were available in different film speeds and some models included a flash.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Digital and pre-digital cameras

Series contains cameras that are designed to capture images using sensors and digital storage media instead of film, as well as pre-digital cameras that combined digital technology with film.
The digital camera replaced the traditional film camera in all but a few niche markets very quickly; as of the beginning of the 21st century, all amateur and most professional photogrpahy now takes place in the digital format. These early cameras track the rapid increase of image quality and camera optinos avilable to the consumer.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Toy and promotional cameras

Series contains cameras designed for children or created and distributed as marketing materials for different corporations. These cameras became most popular after the advent of film cartridges, as this greatly simplified the handling and lowered the cost. These cameras are predominantly inexpensive and simply designed, without features that allow the photographer to change aperture or shutter speed.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Motion-picture viewers

Series contains cameras that use film to capture moving images for display. While still image cameras expose one image at a time on photographic film, motion picture cameras take a series of images (or frames) on long strips of film that are then played back using a projector. The speed at which the film is projected matches that which it was taken, a speed (or frame rate) of 24 frames per second was long the standard in the motion picture industry, and is enough to appear to the human eye as motion and not simply a string of still images. Most of the cameras in this series are for amateur or "home movie" use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Video cameras

Series contains hand-held, shoulder-mounted, or structurally-attached cameras that use electronic components to record moving images and sound. Most items in this series are for home use. For cameras that record moving images using digital components, see the Digital and Pre-digital cameras series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Weisblatt, Betty

Photographers Speak series

Series contains audio recordings of talks given by photographers as part of a series entitled "Photographers Speak", which took place in Rochester NY in 1982. Speakers included: Anthony Barboza, Lillian Bassman, Scott Hyde, Nathan Lyons, Martha Madigan, Nile Root, Henry Holmes Smith, Keith Smith, and John Wood.

Face Productions

Kodak chair lecture series 1988-1989

Series contains audio recordings of public lectures given by photographers, filmmakers, theorists, and critics as part of the Kodak chair lecture series, presented at Ryerson University. Two of the lectures (Tom Sherman, October 21st and Steven Marx, January 27th) were not recorded.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Chair lecture series, 1992-1993

Series contains audio recordings of 5 lectures by photographers and filmmakers that took place as part of the Kodak Chair Lecture series at Ryerson University in the 1992-1993 academic year. No recordings exist for the Richard Benson, Stephen Livick, and Sabastião Salgado lectures.. The lecture schedule was as follows:

Sally Mann, American photographer: September 24, 1992
Douglas Crimp, American historian: October 23, 1992
Mike & Doug Starn, American artists: November 3, 1992
Richard Benson, American photographer: November 16 & 17, 1992
Bernd & Hilla Becher, German conceptual artists: January 15, 1993
Stephen Livick, photographer: February, 1993
Marian Penner-Bancroft, Canadian photographer: March 5, 1993
Sabastião Salgado, Brazilian photojournalist: April, 1993

Image Arts

Kodak Chair lecture series, 1995-1996

Series contains audio recordings of 5 lectures by photographers and filmmakers that took place as part of the Kodak Chair Lecture series at Ryerson University in the 1995-1996 academic year. No recordings exist for the Lily Koltun lecture. The lecture schedule was as follows:

Krzystzof Diczko, Polish American experimental artist: September 22, 1995
Michael Mitchell (introduction), Film Screening: Henri Cartier Bresson, by French photographer Sarah Moon: October 13, 1995
Joseph Blasioli and Victor Malafronte, Canadian filmmakers "Paparazzi and the Cut of Celebrity": October 20, 1995
Lily Koltun, Canadian curator "Canadian Photo History" ( Concurrent with exhibits of former Speaker's work at the Stephen Bulger Gallery January 13 - 17): January 12, 1996
Lorraine Monk, Canadian photographer: February 2, 1996
Nancy Burson, American photographer: February 16, 1996
William Eggleston , American photographers: March 22, 1996

Image Arts

Exhibition prior to 2000

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations and publications for photographic exhibitions at museums, galleries, festivals and universities in the United States and some abroad, between 1985 and 1999. Venues include:
621 Gallery, Tallahassee
Akron Art Museum
Amon Carter Museum
Bibliotheque Nationale de France, site Francois-Mitterrand
Bronx Museum of Art
California Museum of Photography
The Corcoran Gallery of Art
Denver Art Museum
Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia
The Flagler Museum
George Eastman House, Rochester <BR>
Grey Art Gallery, New York University
Haas Gallery of Art, Bloomsburg University
Hood Museum of Art, Darmouth College
The International Center of Photography, New York,
James Howe Gallery, New Jersey
Kanagawa Arts Festival, Japan
Klebenov Gallery
Lehigh University Art Galleries
Missoula Art Museum
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago
The National Trust, UK
Octagon Galleries, Bath
Photographic Resource Centre Boston
Rose Art Museum, Brandis University
Seattle Art Museum
Smithsonian Institution, Washington
Southeast Museum of Photography
Taft Museum, Cincinnati
Tozzer Library, Harvard University
University Gallery at the University of Massachusetts
University of Southern Main
Wellesley College Museum
Wolfsonian, Miami Beach

Nordström, Alison

Undated musem and gallery brochures

Series contains pamphlets, maps, guides and publications for cultural sites and photographic exhibitions between 2000 and 2005. Venues include:

Bath Abbey, England
The Boston Public Library
East Lambrook Manor Garden, England
The Finnish Museum of Photography
Forma International Centre of Photography, Milan
Glastonbury Abbey, England
Harry Ransom Humanities Research Centre, University of Texas at Austin
Harvard University Art Museums
The High Desert Museum, Bent Oregon
Horn Park Gardens, Dorset
International Visual Society Association
Japanese Gardens, Portland
Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego
Museum fur Photographie, Berlin
National Film Theatre, London
National Museum of Natural History, Washington
National Trust, UK
Oregon History Centre
Peabody Essex Museum
Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts
Pittock Mansion, Portland
Parnham House, England
Portland Art Museum
Salvadore Dali Museum, Florida
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities
Suntory Museum of Art, Tokyo
The Tate Modern, London
The Victoria and Albert Museum, London
University of Oxford Botanic Garden

Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Nordström, Alison

Artist catalogues takeaways

Series contains pamphlets, cards, catalogues and booklest produced by photographers as handouts between 2000 and 2005. Artists include:

Lili Almog
Matthre Barlow
Mette Bersang
Beth Block
Joergen Brandt
Brittain Bright
Andrew Buurman
Catherine Cameron
Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Marcelo Coelho
Lois Conner
Michael Corridore
Vincent Delbrouck
Gair Dunlop
Beth Dow
Sebastian Friedman
Johannes Galert
Moyrah Gall
Edouard Glissant
Jules Greenberg
Myar Greene
Kyna Gourley
Linda Hansen
Mark Edward Harris
Heinrich Heidersberger
German Herrera
April Hickox
Julia Hoerner
Michael Itkoff
Adam Jeppeson
Max Kandhola
Misty Keasler
Karen Keating
Jens Knigge
Michael Kolster
Oliver Krebs
Bob Kubiak
James Lerager
Rania Matar
Heather McMlintock
Beatrice Minda
Rizwan Mirza
Edgar Moreno
Huong Ngo
Christian Nielinger
Dan Nelken
Rachel Papo
Mary Parisi
Patricia Pastore
Gilles Perrin
Liv Carle Mortenesen
Liza Nguyen
Elizabeth Orbutt
Betty Press
Susan Raab
David Ramkalawon
Scully & Osterman
Sole, Magdalena
Kristopher Stallworth
David Star
Amy Stein
Wei Leng Tay
Mogens Ulderup
Jim Vecchi
Carla Williams
Dennis Witmer

Pawel Zak

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2000

Series contains invitatinos, pamphlets, press releases and publications for photographic exhibitions in museums, galleries, festivals and universities in the United States and some abroad, during 2000. Venues include:

621 Gallery, Tallahassee
Akron Art Museum
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
The Arts Center, St. Petersburg
Boston Public Library
California Museum of Photography, University of California
Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography
Centrato de ARte Contemporaneo Wifredo Lam, Cuba
Foto Biennale Rotterdam
FotoGaleria, Teatro San Martin, Buenos Aires
Galerie Polaris-Bernard Utudjian, Paris
International Centre of Photography, New York
Julie Saul Gallery, New York
LeMoyne Art Foundation, Tallahassee Florida
Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Palm Beach
Musee de L'Elysee, Lausanne
Museo Maritimo de Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego
Museum of Modern Art, New York

Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego
Open Ends Gallery, Chicago
Oxfordshire Visual Arts Festival, England
pARTs Photographic Arts, Minneapolis
Salt INstitute for Documentary Studies, Portland
Sepia International Inc.
Selby Gallery, Ringling School of Art and Design, Sarasota
SF Camerawork, San Francisco
The Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Skidmore College
Tate Modern, London
University Galleries, Dorothy F, Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Venezia Immagine, Venice
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2001

Series contains invitations, pamphlets, press releases and publications for photographic exhibitions in
museums, galleries, festivals and universities in the United States, and some abroad, during 2001. Venues include:

Akron Art Museum
Apexart, New York
Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe
Ansel Adams Gallery, Yosemite National Park
The Arts Centre, St. Petersburg, Florida
Boston University Art Gallery
Buckley Center Gallery, University of Portland
Camerawork Gallery, Portland
Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona
Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College Florida
Dorothy F, Scmidt College of Arts and Letters, Florida Atlantic University
The Edward Carter Centre, New York
Elizabeth Leach gallery, Portland
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Galerie Polaris-Bernard Utudjian, Paris
Gallery 292, New York
Hillsborough Community College
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
Institute of Contemporary Art at Main College of Art
Internaltional Center of Photography, New York
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
Kommunale Galerie, Frankfurt
Leica Gallery, New York
The Light Factory, Charlotte, NC
Louise, Paris
Massachusetts College of Art
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College
Museum of Modern Art, New York
nederlands foto instituut, Netherlands
Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach
The Organisation for Visual Arts, London
Peabody Essex Museum
Photo Americas, Portland
Photographic Image Gallern, Portland
Portland Art Museum
Portland Classical Chinese Garden
The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art
Ringling School of Art and Design, Sarasota
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
SK Josefsberg Studio, Portland
Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach Community College
Victoria and Albert Museum

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2002

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in museums, galleries, festivals and universities in the United States and some abroad, during 2002. Venues include:

Brooklyn Museum of Art
Civiche Raccolte d'Arte Applicate ed Incisioni, Milan
DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park
FotoFest, Houston
Houston Centre for Photography
Kouros, New York
Menil Collection, Houston
Museum of Modern Art, New York
Museum of Photographic Art, San Diego
Peabody Essex Museum
Portland Art Museum
Portland Institute for Contemporary Art
San Diego Museum of Man
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
World Forestry Centre Museum, Portland
Victoria and Albert Museum

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2003

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in museums, galleries, festivals and universities in the United States and some abroad, during 2003. Venues include:

Alliance Francaise, Houston
Brighton Photo Biennial
Kerrigan Campbell art + projects, New York
Mackey Gallery, Houston
Museum fur Kunst und Kulturgeschichte,
The National Gallery, Prague
San Francisco Mosaics
San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art
Sicardi Gallery, Houston
Wyatt Gallery

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2004

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities in the United States and some abroad, during 2004. Venues include:

5004 Feagan Studios, Houston
AIPAD, New YOrk
Anya Tish Gallery, Houston
Aperture, New York
Arthur Meyerson studio/gallery, Houston
Asia Society, Houston
Corcoran Gallery, Washington
Daniel Cooney Fine Art, New York
Fotofest, Houston
George Eastman House, Rochester
Gregory Lind Gallery, San Francisco
Houston Centre for Photography
Internaitonal Centre of Photography, New York
Koelsch Gallery, Houston
Mackey Gallery, Houston
Magnum, New York
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Museum of the City of New York
Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York
Public Art Fund, New York
Redbud Gallery, Houston
Rizarios Exhibition Centre, Monodendri Greece
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Whitney Biennial, New York

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2006

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities in the United States and some abroad, during 2006. Venues include:

Affordable Art Fair, New York
Boot Photography Editions
Chambers Fine Art, New York
Contact, Toronto photography festival
Contretye, Bruxelles
Fotofest, Houston
Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Zurich
Fotostiftung Schweiz, Winterthur, Zurich
Galerie Birthe Laursen, Copenhagen
Galerie Pernkopf, Berlin
Gallery 44, Toronto
Gallery 482, Queensland
George Eastman House, Rochester
Hayward Gallery, London
Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington
I space, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Imperial War Museum, London
International Center of Photography
Janet Borden Inc., New York
Kantonah Museum of Art
Lida Sette Gallery, Arizona
Lodnon Architecture Biennale
Magnum, London
Magnum, New York
Magnum, Paris
Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College
Museum of Modern Art, Oxford
Museum of Modern Art, New York
Museum of the City of New York
National Portrait Gallery, London
Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica
Photo-London
RCS Paris
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Steven Kasher Gallery, New York
Studio Thomas Kellner, Siegen Germany
Tate Modern, London
Toronto International Art Fair
Ubu Gallery, New York
Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Whitney Biennial, New York
Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2007

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions produced by international museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities during 2007. See sub-series records for lists of venues.

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2008

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in international museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities during 2008. See sub-series records for lists of venues.

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2009

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in international museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities during 2009. See sub-series records for lists of venues.

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2010

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in international museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities during 2010. See sub-series records for lists of venues.

Nordström, Alison

Exhibitions, 2011

Series contains pamphlets, press releases, invitations, and publications for photographic exhibitions in international museums, galleries, festivals, publishers and universities during 2011. See sub-series records for lists of venues.

Nordström, Alison

Gardner's Art Through the Ages

Series contains images to accompany Gardner's Art Through the Ages, 12th edition. Topics include sculpture, architecture, painting, and photgoraphy from ancient to modern. Slides are housed in 2 binders, with index included.

Saskia Cultural Documentation

Gardner's Art Through the Ages

Series contains images to accompany Gardner's Art Through the Ages, 10th edition. Topics include sculpture, architecture, painting, and photgoraphy from ancient to modern. Slides are housed in 1 binder, with index included.

The Macmillan Company of Canada Limited