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MacInnis AudioVisual Collection

  • 2005.002
  • Fondo
  • [ca. 1934-2004]

The collection consists of audio, video and film recordings made by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during his underwater dives from the 1970s to 2004. The bulk of the collection concerns the shipwrecks of the Titanic, the Breadalbane and the Edmund Fitzgerald. There are also many films that highlight deep sea ecology and oceanography, particularly hydrothermal vents and deep sea sharks. Most recordings in the collection consist of rough or unedited footage. The collection also includes television and radio programs on which Dr. MacInnis appeared and some video and audio recordings by MacInnis' friends and colleagues. There is a small selection of footage collected by MacInnis for research purposes, including footage of William Beebe and Otis Barton's deep sea dives in their revolutionary 'bathysphere' in 1934.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep Sea

Deep sea exploration involves diving at depths greater then humanly possible without a submersible vehicle, or greater than 1000 feet below the surface. In this series are moving images of hydrothermal vents, deep sea sharks, the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Komsomollets, and ocean floor ecology. Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in deep sea settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions. Some of the recordings are in Russian.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Sub Int. looking at lannonar sci. equip ; #18

This underwater recording is of scent traps at various depths and the sea life that ate the bait. The traps are recorded at depths of 490 feet, 1000 feet and 2007 feet. The traps contain brine shrimp and fluorescein, a substance that is used to cause fluorescence and therefore visibility. Shrimp and a jellyfish that have eaten the bait can be seen at the deepest depth in this recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Jelly Fish single/multiple ; #19

This recording is of hundreds of jellyfish swimming at an undisclosed depth. The highlight of this recording is a mass of jellyfish that are together for unknown reasons. Those conducting the research theorize that the jellyfish are either caught together, there tentacles intertwined and knotted, or feasting on something.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Recent advances in the deep frontier

Dr. Joe MacInnis, a physician and underwater researcher, discusses the recent advances in underwater research at a Nipissing University lecture. MacInnis begins with the discovery of the shipwrecks: the Titanic and the Atocha, and follows with the main part of the lecture, the discovery accomplished by his own team of Breadalbane shipwreck. Included are: a brief history of the ship, the efforts that went into the discovery, the difficulties of Arctic exploration as well as the benefits of cold water related to the state of preservation of the ship, and scientific discoveries that result from this type of expedition. The later part of the lecture explores new aspects of undersea research and future expeditions planned for Bermuda and the Canadian Great Lakes.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Bermuda Sub-Dive, Emory Eugene Shark Baiting

Unedited live action footage of six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait in a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The recording also includes other types of deep ocean animal life like crabs, eels and/or fish and an unidentified translucent creature. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, an edited and produced version of this recording.

Glen Warren Productions

Soviet Nuclear sub stories

The recording is of several news clips featuring footage taken of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine: Komsomolets, followed by a dub of raw footage of the wreck. The news stories all discuss the fall of the Komsomolets and the possible threat of leakage from the nuclear reactors and nuclear tipped warheads that were aboard this new class of submarines. According to the newscasters, the footage was released by the Soviets to the public with hopes to entice international awareness about the threat of nuclear leakage and to receive international aid in dealing with this situation. The raw footage of the Komsomolets that follows the section of news clips features various parts of the vessel as it lies deep in the ocean. A discussion can be heard by those aboard the submersible that is recording the wreck but the conversation is completely in Russian. News clips include statements from Dr. Joe MacInnis. The capture took place in the Arctic Ocean off the coast of northern Europe.

ABC Television Network

MIR Dive - Kamchatka - Edited tape

This recording is of hydrothermal vents and surrounding chemosynthetic life deep on the ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. This recording was made by the MIR submersibles that travel with their mothership RV Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, an oceanographic research vessel. The submersibles can reach depths of 6000 meters (almost 20,000 feet).

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG Atlantic vents

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.
Deep sea sharks Bermuda 4,000' is an edited live action recording of two six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait that is inside a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The unedited version of this version can be seen in: Bermuda sub-dive roll 3; Emory Eugenie shark baiting. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in: Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, a produced version of the recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Komsomolets - cut 1 and cut 2

This recording is a documentary account of the survey conducted with the aid of the Mir submersibles of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets. The recording begins with an at sea memorial for sunken vessel. Next are shots of a map of the Komsomolets with certain areas marked in red, possibly where samplers and beacons will be left during the submarine dives to record radioactive leakage. Following this are dives to the sunken vessel in the Mir 1 and 2 submersibles. During the dives, Mir’s mechanical arms take parts and samples and leave samplers and other objects in and around the Komsomolets.
The K-278 Komsomolets, a Soviet nuclear submarine, was launched May 9, 1983 and was lost April 7, 1989 in northern Europe in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine had an operating depth of 1000 meters and was designed with the ability to dive to 1500 meters. Aboard the vessel were torpedoes including two nuclear warheads. The submarine’s demise was caused by a fire; it sank to a depth of around 1500 meters. There were 25 survivors and 42 fatalities. The controversy surrounding the loss of this vessel has to do with radioactive contamination from the nuclear reactor and nuclear torpedoes. Leakage could potentially contaminate drinking water, affect fish population and the ecology. Several expeditions to the Komsomolets have been undertaken to probe the area. Although earlier tests showed no signs of dangerous leakage, later tests revealed this was not so. The Komsomolets has since been buried in mud to seal fractures and contain radioactive leakage.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG - first edit

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' was recorded deep in the Atlantic Ocean. The location and date information is documented in: TAG Atlantic Vents, an edited and produced version of this recording.
TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the vent ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was probably made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 1 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Newt and the Deep Rover submersibles. Trainees include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Robert Furgason, President of Texas University Corpus Christi. Dr. Joe MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 2 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Deep Worker and the Deep Rover submersibles. Dr. Joe MacInnis pilots a submersible in the pool. Other traines include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Wes Turner, biology professor at Texas University Corpus Christi. The recording also contains an interview with Phil Nuytten of Nuytco Research in which he explains ideas behind the design of the Deep Worker submersible. MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Lakes

In this series are moving images of underwater explorations of lakes in Canada (Lake Huron, Lake Erie) and a Russia (Lake Baikal). Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in lake settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions and promotional videos.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane MPV underwater good from video

Notes from initial viewing: colour (faded); no narration, no sound track. Man in yellow ADS (atmospheric diving suit, possibly a WASP suit) picking up shipwreck's steering wheel, with orange coral growth. Bioluminescent sea creatures; jellyfish swimming towards WASP suit. Sea life inhabiting inside of exterior cubby shelf on Breadalbane shipwreck. WASP suit attached to cable, in mid-water. Man inside WASP suit gesturing to come closer; wipes inside of helmet with white cloth.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Linhof Technika lenses

Item is a lens for 4 x 5 in. exposures on sheet film Schneider-Kreuznach symmar f6.8/130 mm. lens, Compur-Synchro shutter 1-1/500 sec. Includes 2 other lenses: Scheider-Kreuznach symmar 1:5.6 135 mm, and the other is 1:5.6 240mm. Both have Compur shutters. This camera is considered to be the ultimate for architecture and technical photography. It is still on the market and still used by professionals.

Heritage Camera Collection

  • 2005.006
  • Colección
  • [between ca. 1860 and 2010]

The Heritage Camera Collection is comprised of cameras, mainly from the Wilhem E. Nassau Camera Collection, the Irving G. Rumney fonds, and several other small, individual donations.

This collection traces the evolution of the tools of popular photography from the turn of the nineteenth century to the current digital age. Many of the cameras were manufactured by Kodak Canada or Eastman Kodak, but there are also examples from many other manufacturers, such as: Ernst Leitz, Minox, Polaroid, Nikon, Rollei, Mamiya, Olympus, Contax, and several companies that pre-date, and were eventually amalgamated into Kodak, including the Rochester Optical Company.

Items in the collection are arranged in series according on their form and function; the categories are based on the research and publications of Michel Auer and Todd Gustavson, and often overlap chronologically.

Series are as follows:

Early cameras
Dry plate cameras
Field cameras
Folding (bellows) cameras
Box and snapsot roll film cameras
Detective cameras
Panoramic cameras
Miniature and sub-miniature cameras
Single lens reflex cameras
Twin lens reflex cameras
35mm cameras
In-camera processing (instant) cameras
Point and shoot caemras
One-time-use cameras
Digital and pre-digital cameras
Toy and promotional cameras
Motion-picture cameras
Video cameras

To browse the series, click on the "View the list" link under the "See the sous-fonds, series or sub-series lists for this collection" title (to the right of the page).

No. 1A Pocket Kodak

Item is a folding camera for 2 1/2 x 4 1/4 in. exposure on A116 film. The Autographic feature allowed notes to be made on the film by scratching them into the film paper with a special stylus. A window opened in the back of the camera to expose the backing paper. Has a Kodak F-79 lens.

No. 3A Folding Autographic Brownie

Item is a folding camera for 5 1/2 x 3 1/4 in. exposures. The Autogrpahic feature allowed notes to be made on the film by scratching them into the film paper with a special stylus. A window opened in the back of the camera to expose the backing paper. Lens is a Bausch + Lomb rectilinear lens with ball bearing shutter 1/25 - 1/100 sec. The camera was manufactured from 1913-1926.

Ensign model V

Item is a folding camera for 3 x 4 in. exposures on Ensign quarter plate film. Lens is an Ensign Anastigmat series 6 lens, Sector shutter 1 sec. - 1/100 sec.

Agfa Standard Type 254

Item is a folding roll film camera for 6 x 9 cm. exposures. Equipped with a brillant and optic viewfinders and Agfa-Anastigmat, 4.5/10.5 cm lens.

No. 3A Autographic Kodak special

Item consists of a No. 3A Autographic Kodak special folding camera that makes pictures sized 3.25 x 5.5" on 122 film. Comes with CRF rangefinder. This is one of the very first cameras manufactured with a coupled rangefinder. The Autographic feature allowed notes to be made on the film by scratching them into the film paper with a special stylus. A window opened in the back of the camera to expose the backing paper.

Ihagee Rulex camera

Item is an early folding plate camera with a Rulex triple anastigmat F13, 1:4 lens and an unmarked compound shutter. Includes both a brilliant viewfinder and optical direct finder.

Ansco Vest Pocket No.0

Item is a small, folding strut camera for making 4 x 6.5cm exposures on 127 film. Unlike folding bed cameras, the lens remains exposed (on the outside of the camera) when the camera is collapsed. Lens is an Ansco Anastigmat f6.3.

Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta (A) 531

Item is a high quality black leather-covered folding roll film camera, with a rangefinder of the rotating wedge type, gear coupled to front cell focusing lens. This camera has a chrome top. It has the normal lens - a Tessar 75 mm 1:3.5. and a Synchrop Compur shutter.

Agfa Isolette I

Item is a folding camera for 6 x 6 cm roll film exposures. Shutter release is on the body, but there was no double exposure prevention. Equipped with a Agnar F4.5/85mm lens with Vario shutter.

Kodak Senior Six-20

Item is a self-erecting folding amateur camera for 8 exposures of 5.7 x 8.25 cm (2 1/2 x 4 1/4") on 620 roll film. This camera originally sold for $30.00 in the United States.

Kodak Premoette Senior camera

Item is a self-erecting folding bed camera for use with 5.7 x 8.25 cm (2 1/2" x 4 1/4") Premo brand film packs. Lens is a Rapid Rectilinear lens by Bausch and Lomb with a Kodak Ball Bearing shutter and cable release.

No. 2 Folding Autographic Brownie

Item is a self-erecting folding camera for 5.7 x 8.25 cm (2 1/2" x 3 1/4") exposures with 120 autographic roll film. The Autogrpahic feature allowed notes to be made on the film by scratching them into the film paper with a special stylus. A window opened in the back of the camera to expose the backing paper. Lens is a Bausch and Lomb with Kodak ball bearing shutter.

Bentzin Primar folding camera

Item is an compact double extension folding plate or sheet film camera for 9 x 12 cm (3.5" x 4.75"). Lens is a Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 1 :4,5 f : 13.5cm with a Compur shutter (1 to 1/200th). The camera has both a brilliant viewfinder and a sports-finder.

Kodak Vest Pocket Model B

Item is a folding strut camera from the popular Eastman Kodak Vest Pocket Kodak series. For 4.5 x 6 cm (1.75" x 2.36") exposures on small format, 127 roll film.

Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic

Item is a folding trellis strut camera from the Vest Pocket series for 4.5 x 6 cm (1.77" x 2.36") exposures on 127 roll film. Lens is a Kodak Anastigmat 84mm f4.7, with a ball-bearing shutter with B,T, 1/25, 1/50, etc.. A case in included.

Balda Baldax 6x6

Item is a folding camera for 6 x 6 cm (2.36" x 2.36") exposures on 120 format roll film. Lens is a Schneider Xenar 7.5cm f2.9 with Compur Shutter.

Plenax PB-20

Item is a typical folding 620 roll film camera - uses an inset mask to shoot 6 X 9 cm or 6 X 4.5 images. Shutter has no ID marking.
Tripar Lens.

Kodak Recomar 18

Item is a folding camera for 5.7 x 8.25 cm (2.25" x 3.25") plate or sheet film. The camera was designed as the Nagel 18 by Dr. August Nagel for his company in Stuttgart Germany and renamed the Recomar 18 after the company was purchased by Kodak and became the German branch of Eastman Kodak: Kodak AG. Lens is a Kodak compur.

Brownie Hawkeye flash model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Brownie Target Six-20

Item is a small box camera with leatherette casing and metal faceplate. Camera is loaded with Kodak Verichrome 620 film.

Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

No. 2 Brownie model F

Item is an aluminum box camera for 5.7 x 8.25 cm (2 1/4" x 3 1/4") exposures on 120 film. This is a variation on previous models, which were leatherette covered cardboard. Simple lens with 3 aperture settings and rotary shutter.

Brownie Target SIX-20

For 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. exposure on 620 film Acromatic lens, 2 aperture settings, rotary shutter. Metal and leatherette case. Case will not separate to open camera.

No. 2C Brownie camera

Item is a fairly large box camera, for 6 7.5 x 12.7 cm (3 x 5") exposures on Kodak 130 film. Simple lens and rotary shutter.

Gevabox 6x9

Item is a waist level box camera for 6 x 9 cm (2.4" x 3.5") exposures on 120 film.

No. 2 Cartridge Hawkeye Model C

Item is a leatherette covered box camera for exposures on 120 film. Originally designed and produced by the Boston Camera Company, Hawk-Eye camera production changed hands twice, once in 1890 when sold to the Blair Camera Company, then again in 1907, when Eastman Kodak purchased the company. Simple lens and rotary shutter.

Kodak Duaflex II

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 620 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder; it is a simple box camera design. The f8 lens has a 3 aperture settings.

Baby Hawkeye

Item is a small box camera for 4 x 6.5 cm (1.57" x 2.55") exposures on 127 format roll film. Manufactured in England circa 1936, the camera is an all-metal box with a unidentified lens and a simple Kodak shutter. It has a simple wire viewfinder.

Voigtlander Brilliant

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 120 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder used only to frame the view and not to focus.

Agfa synchro box 600

Item is a metal box camera for 8, 6 x 9 cm (2.36" x 3.54") exposures on 120 film. The simple design includes a single-element Meniscus lens, fixed speed rotary shutter and brilliant viewfinder.

Ansco Shur-Flash

Item is an inexpensive box camera made of fiberboard and covered with imitation leather. The camera has a Gallileo-type viewfinder only (no brilliant viewfinder), flash contacts, and a single speed shutter that is fast enough to accommodate bulb flashes. It used 120 size roll film.

Anscoflex

Item is an all-metal camera designed by Raymond Loewy for 6 x 6 cm (2.36" x 2.36") exposures on 620 film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder, it is a simple box camera design with a two element Meniscus F11 lens and fixed 1/60th shutter speed. The front panel slides up to reveal the lens and viewfinder.

Pho-Tak Reflex I

Item is a simple box camera designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera. The topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder, the lens is a "colour corrected" Bohmar Precision lens (74mm) allows no focusing.

No. 2A Antar

Item is a simple, wooden box camera with leatherette covering and brass trim, for use with 116 roll film (or D6 and D12 Agfa film).

Ventura Synchro Box

Item is a mid-century German metal box camera with plastic covering and art-deco front. It was manufactured in 1951 by Agfa Camerawerk. The Synchro term in the name comes from the fact that it has a flash sync shutter. The lens is a 105mm f/11 single-element Meniscus fixed focus lens with a focus range of 3 meters to infinity. A pull-out tab is located above the shutter release to change the aperture. When the tab is fully pushed in, there is a larger aperture approximately equivalent to f/11; the middle tab is a smaller aperture approximately equivalent to f/16; and the last tab is the larger aperture (f/11) with a yellow filter. The shutter is an instant-return self-cocking rotary shutter controlled by a simple spring. The shutter speed can be adjusted by a small sliding lever directly under the side viewfinder. The dot is 1/50th of a second, and the long line is bulb mode. The optics are only slightly better than a toy camera, and have a soft focus but little to no vignetting. Camera takes 6x9cm images on 120mm film. This is the export version made c1951. In 1951 and later, the Agfa name appeared on the front of the camera. It originally sold for $5-10.
Dimensions: 9.7 cm (3.75") x 7.5 cm (3") x 11.5 cm (4.5")

Six-20 Brownie

Item is a box camera made by the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York, USA between May 1933 and April 1941. It shoots 620 rollfilm and makes 6x9cm photographs. The is the US version of the camera. There was also a UK model that was drastically different in build and facia. The cardboard body is covered in leatherette, and the metal front panel is decorated with a geometric art-deco design. The Six-20 Brownie has a top viewfinder as well as a side viewfinder. This camera has two focusing zones - 5 to 10 feet and beyond 10 feet - which can be selected below the lens controlled by a spring-loaded lever. The shutter speed of the Six-20 is fixed at approximately 1/25th of a second. There is also a bulb mode, which is accessed by a pull-out tab above the shutter release. The Six-20 Brownie was originally sold for $2.50.

Ensign Ful-Vue

Item is a box camera manufactured by Ensign in 1945. There are two versions of the Ensign Ful-Vue, a pre-WWII version and a postwar version. The item in the collection is the less common postwar version. This model consists of a black metal body with an oddly rounded top viewfinder. The postwar model was also available in blue, red and grey. The black version was originally listed and sold between $15-25.

Imperial Debonair

Item is a 1950s-era box camera made in the United States of America. The Imperial Debonair shoots 12 square 6x6cm exposures on 620 roll film. Also manufactured in black, olive and maroon, item in the collection is brown. The Imperial Debonair originally sold for between $15-$25. The same camera with different faceplate was also marketed as the "Official Cub Scout Camera".

Expo Watch Camera

Item is a small novelty film camera that is disguised as a railroad pocket watch, first produced into early 1900's and sold until 1939. The exposure is made through the winding stem and the winding knob serves as a lens cap, and required special film cartridges. The camera is relatively common, as it was marketed for so long and several variations exist in the "Expo" trademark style, the winding knob, and the viewfinder shape. Black, red, blue enameled versions produced about 1935 are rarer. Item has its original box and triangular viewfinder, but the lens cap is missing.

Kodak Disc 3100

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap.

Minox C camera

Sleek horizontal metal camera that expands to reveal lens. This is an auto-exposure camera, but there are 3 adjustable dials on top. Comes in specially fitted black leatherette carrying case. Takes 8.5 x 11mm film, and has a focal length of 15mm.

Minox 35 GL

Item is a Uses 35 mm film, 1/30 - 1/500 shutter: Minotar 1:2.8 f=35 mm. lens and 35 EL manual.

Zeiss Ikon Baby Box 54/18 camera

Baby Box Tengor - Baseball sized box camera. Simple excellent camera with a "legend". Hair sharp 16 photos 3 x 4 cm 127 Roll Film. Lens is a Goerz F:11.

Hit miniature camera

Item is a "Hit" type novelty subminiature camera for 14 x 14 mm exposures on 17.5 mm paper-backed rollfilm. This style of camera was named for the original Hit camera design that inspired many similar cameras. This design is a chrome and black leatherette construction. Hit cameras were first produced in post WWII Japan, and were sold for about $0.50 each. Miniature accessories, such as filters, lens hoods and leather carrying cases, were also available. It is not known if this camera is related to the Crystar company.

Minolta-16-Ps

Item is a subminiature camera taking 9mm film (in cartridge). Lens is a Rokkor F3.5/25mm. Comes with wrist strap, film cartridge, manual, pouch and three filters in original box. Group in original gift box. Shutter works.

McKoewn pg.682

Minolta 16 QT

Item is a 12 x 17 mm size subminiature camera. Has a Rokkor F3.5/25mm lens, shutter 30-250, and auto-metering. Also has a hot shoe electronic flash attachment.

Minolta-16

Item is a subminiature camera, taking 10 x 14 mm exposures on 16mm film in special cassettes. Comes with 4 extension lense and a tripod adapter. Lens is a Rokkor F2.8/22mm .

Ricoh Golden 16

Item is a subminiature camera for 10 x 14 mm exposures on 16mm film in special cassettes. The camera has a removable lens system and includes a Riken Ricoh F1:3.5/25mm and Riken Telescopic lens F1:5.6/40mm in original wooden box and a box of Golden Ricoh Film in cartridge. The Golden Ricoh was originally names the Golden Steky, both models were higher end miniature cameras and were electroplated in gold.

McKoewn, pg. 828

Kodak Disc 4000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. The camera used Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and, while the camera did well when it was first introduced, it lost populatiry due to the low quality prints it produced. Item includes a built in flash and wrist strap.

Minolta 16 MG-S

Item is a subminiature camera, similar to the Minolta 16 MG, manufactured between 1966 and 1971. The images produced by 16 MG-S are a substantial improvement over the 16 MG. By using single perforated film format, the negative size was increased from 10x14mm to 12x17mm thus producing an image almost 50% larger. Composed of 4 elements in 3 groups the 23mm (f2.8-16) lens had a fixed-focus set at about 13 feet. Shutter speeds ranged from 1/30 to 1/500.

Linhof Super Technika III 6x9

Item is a large format camera for 6 x 9 cm exposures on sheet or roll film. The Technika system used interchangable lenses mounted on boards. The back is extendible and is adjustable no all four corners to control for perspective. A plate for lens change range finder and calibration is mounted on the camera and the viewfinder has a special cover plate. No plate holder, or film holders are included, the lens is mounted on a non Linhof plate and is a substitute - a Schneider Xenar f4.5 105 mm with a Compur shutter 1-1/250.

Salyut Kiev 88C

Item is a medium format, single lens reflex replica of the Swedish Hasselblad 1600 F camera manufactured in Russia. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Shutter is a foil focal plane style. Camera kit includes 2 film backs, an eye level viewfinder and 80 mm 2.8 lens.

Kalimar Reflex

Item is a single lens reflex camera 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 roll film. Made by Fujita Optical Company for Kalimar (in the USA), the cloth focal plane shutter allows exposures from B to 1/500 sec. Film counter set manually at the first exposure (start at arrow on film back) Sports style viewfinder on viewer shaft.

Rolleiflex Automat model 1

Item is medium format twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Lens is a Zeiss Tessar f4.5, 75 mm. with a Compur shutter, 1 - 1/300 sec.. The Automat models included a film counter that used the thickness of the film roll backing to count exposed frames. The Model 1 is also known as Model RF 111A.

Mamiya C3 Professional

Item is a medium format twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 roll film. Marketed as a professional camera, lenses are interchangeable (both the upper and lower lenses are removed together) without exposing the film. Extra lens included (Mamiya-Secor f4.5, 65 - 135 mm with a Seikosha - S shutter 1 - 1/500 sec.)

Rolleiflex Grey Baby

Item is a knob-advance twin lens reflex camera for 4 x 4 cm exposures on 127 format film. More compact than other twin lens reflex cameras, with a smaller negatives, the Grey Body has a Xenar f3.5 lens with a Syncrho compur shutter. The camera comes in a gray leather case and is equipped with an ultra violet Waltz filter and a lens hood.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Rolleiflex Grey Baby, demonstation model

Item is a knob-advance twin lens reflex camera for 4 x 4 cm exposures on 127 format film. More compact than other twin lens reflex cameras, with a smaller negatives, the Grey Body has a Xenar f3.5 lens with a Syncrho compur shutter. The camera comes in a gray leather case and is equipped with an ultra violet Waltz filter and a lens hood.

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