Mostrando 1725 resultados

Descripción archivística
Canadian Architect
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

823 resultados con objetos digitales Muestra los resultados con objetos digitales

GJVN Housing

File contains a photograph depicting an exterior view of GJVN Housing. The concrete structure is four-storeys and features a unique angular overhang at the front entrance with a round skylight cut through it.

Burley, Robert

Canadian Architect magazine fonds

  • F 2009.002
  • Fondo
  • 1955-[ca. 1990]

The archive contains thousands of negatives and photographs taken for publication in Canadian Architect magazine. As announced in the magazine's inaugural issue, Canadian Architect reviewed and documented both public and private structures, including churches, homes, businesses, airports, government offices and public spaces. The subjects of the photographs are generally modern Canadian structures, but images of some International sites and early 20th century Canadian buildings can be found in the collection as well. The collection also contains images of entries to the annual national design awards program sponsored by the magazine, the "Awards of Excellence." The collection also functions as a record of the changing nature of magazine production over the latter part of the 20th century. Canadian Architect was the first business publication in Canada to make engravings on site from original photographs, allowing for a rich selection of both prints and negatives. Instructions by editors and layout artists regarding their eventual printing in the magazine are often written directly on the prints, along with photographer's stamps, credit lines or captions.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, 127 East Pender Street

This historic 3-storey brick building in Vancouver's Chinatown district was partially destroyed by fire in 1972. The façade was preserved as a free-standing frame and the building behind it was demolished and re-built in 1973. It is an early example of Chinatown's distinctive architecture, typical of other buildings on Pender Street. It was used by importers, merchants, restaurants and clan associations and is sometimes also referred to as the Lee Building for its association with businessman Ron Bick Lee.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, 131 Water Street / Gaslight Square

Project 200 was an initiative to restore Vancouver's most rundown areas. This project complete by 1975, is a 3 building complex that maintains the continuity of the street's facades. Shops are located on the ground level with offices above. The 6 oriel windows are a unique addition to the brick facade.

Canadian Architect

Coquitlam, 861 Smith Avenue / Dodson residence

Canadian Housing Design Council Award Winner 1971
"A small house which is carefully screened from street traffic by the retention of trees. Multi-levels and open planning add interest. A good lesson in planning particularly in regard to space and light." Owners; Mr & Mrs R. Dodson.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, 2131 Riverside Drive / Kiyooka residence

Folder contains 6 b&w photographs of the Kiyooka residence in Vancouver, B.C. A residence for artist Roy Kenzie Kiyooka and his wife Monica Kiyooka. Winner ward for residential design 1971 from the Canadian Housing Design Council. The designer of the residence was Mrs. Monica Kiyooka.
Caption on verso: "A delightful house which takes full advantage of a forest-river orientation...an open, stepped, plan with soaring spaces."

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, 2970 Roseberry Street

Canadian Housing Design Council Winner, Award for Residential Design 1971. " An outstanding example of how a simple design ('L" shape) can be set to achieve maximum privacy and capture the joys of site and sun".

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 4001 Mt. Seymour Pkwy

Winner of 1974 CHDC. Jury comments: "Sensitivity to form, exellent siting with good circulation combine to create both unit and community scale very appropriate to the setting. Neighbourhoods are visually identified by use of colour changes. Although these houses are attached, there isa walkway from front to back for each unit plus a separate basement entry.

Roaf, John

Vancouver, 5177 Sarita Place

Winner of Award for Residential Design 1971. Extract from jury report: "... materials and form relate sympathetically to the tall trees retained on the site... a sensitive siting and solution for a house which makes the most of the natural amentities of forest and stream".

Boutry, Bryan

Vancouver, 6028 Eagleridge Dr

Canadian Housing Design Council Award for Residential Design 1971. Extract from jury report: "Subtle and beautifully proportioned forms and openings frame the views and the sense of exhilaration is heighened by cantilevered spaces and decks". Owners: Mr & Mrs David Catton.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 6350 Alma St

Winner of Award for Residential Design 1971. Owners: Mr. & MRS. B.C. Cobanli. Extract from jury report: " An exelent open-planned house... sky lights allow light to flood into rooms; cosy alcoves and depressed floors offset wide open speces".

Roaf, John

Vancouver, 7235 Arbutus Place

Winner of Award for Residential Design 1971. Owner: Mr. & Mrs. HP Brasso. Extract from jury report: "A large house on a magnificent site... the planning, materials and form are well used to support the grand nature of the interior spaces and vistas to the sea".

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Bank of British Columbia

The HSBC Canada Building is a 23-storey office tower in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. It is located at 885 West Georgia Street. It houses HSBC Canada's headquarters. The skyscraper was originally built, on the site of the former Hotel Devonshire, as the headquarters of the Bank of British Columbia in 1987 by WZMH Architects. The building's lobby features a gigantic magnetically induced pendulum artwork.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Bank of Canada

The building is 58.9 m.high with 15 stories. The exterior of the building is clad with precast finished with concrete panels and
columns. Bronze was used for all building metals. The Greek cross floor design allows for six corner offices per floor.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 550 W Hastings st.

This large scale model built by Stephan Dye of Grafotto Studios Inc, is the proposal for the 550 W Hastings renewal of the original Toronto Dominion temple bank. The project includes a 400 room hotel and shopping complex. Alternative name is bank charrette. A proposal drawing of the interior and exterior view of 550 W Hastings st., Vancouver BC. This heritage building is originally the Toronto Dominion bank. It was originally to be demolished however the Heritage Committee of Vancouver sought to rescue the facade of this bank and incorporate it into a project that would include a shopping complex and a 400 room hotel.

Spectva Colour

Vancouver, Barnett house

Verso: This attractive residence, owned by Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Barnett of Burnaby BC, earned an Award of Excellence for its designers Fred Thornton Hollingsworth and Barry Vance Downs in the recently concluded Canadian Wood Design Awards program of 1965. According to the judges, "traditional West Coast Materials, in the form of rough cedar boards, with carefully selected finishes, have provided an elegant and empathetic dwelling." The awards program was sponsored by the National Design Council and the Federal Department of Industry in association with the Canadian Wood council.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Bayles house

Credit photograph to Fred S. Schiffer, Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society.
The architect was inspired by the Japanese style SUKIYA, which means to bring harmony to a composition of disparate materials found in the rough.

Schiffer, Fred S.

Vancouver, Bayshore apartments

Folder consists of 4 photographic prints of the outside of the Bayshore Apartment complex. The building is attributed to Henriquez and Partners Architects, 322 Water Street, Vancouver, B.C.

Otte, Gary

Vancouver, BC Electric building

The Electra Building in Vancouver, British Columbia was built in 1957 as the new headquarters for the BC Electric Company, under its president Dal Grauer. A few days after Grauer's death in 1961, it became part of a new provincial crown corporation named BC Hydro. The 21 story, 89 m (293 ft), building was designed by architect, Ronald Thom. At the time it was claimed to be the tallest building in the Commonwealth, although this was not true. After BC Hydro moved to new offices in Vancouver and Burnaby in the late 1990s, the building was sold, and in 1998, was renovated and converted primarily into residential condo space.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_Building_(Vancouver)

The photographic print in this folder depicts a boardroom.

Warrington, Graham

Vancouver, BC Hydro

Folder contains a photographic print used in the February 1980 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Canadian Architect

Victoria, BC Legislature

1893 Legislative Buildings, Victoria, B.C
British High Victorian Gothic, mid-nineteenth century Italianate and American Richardsonian Romanesque styles.
Three photographs depicts the House of commons before renovation.

Fulker, John & Barnard

Vancouver, Canada Place

Canada Place, [Expo '86] is title of the article published in Canadian Architect in 1986 July, v.31, no.7, p.20-32. Article included aerial photo., site plans, photos., maps. Canada Place, situated on the downtown waterfront of Vancouver, British Columbia, opened in 1986 as the Canada Pavilion at Expo 86. It was later converted into the Vancouver Trade & Convention Centre. The theme of Canada Place is nautical. The building adorns the downtown waterfront with a superstructure resembling a large ocean vessel, a powerful prow thrusting into the harbour and a roof line of five white sails.

Lenscape Incorporated

Vancouver, BC Skytrain station

Construction of the original skytrain line began on March 1, 1982 under the Social Credit government of Bill Bennett,who inaugurated the system at Waterfront Station. SkyTrain was conceived as a legacy project of Expo 86 and the first line was finished in 1985 in time to showcase the fair's theme: "Transportation and Communication: World in Motion ? World in Touch".SkyTrain opened on December 11, 1985 with free weekend service, and entered full revenue service on January 3, 1986.Commuter station; part of Greater Vancouver's Advanced Light Rapid Transit system. Article published in Canadian Architect magazine also contains photos., secns., site plan, dets., sketches.

Perspective 5 photography & design Ltd

Vancouver, BC Telephone

Folder consists of 3 black and white photographs of the B.C. Telephone Service Yard Offices in Victoria, B.C. Architects associated with the building are Blair MacDonald, McCarter Nairne & Partners Vancouver. Photographs were used in the June 1966 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, Beaton residence

Folder consists of 4 black and white photographs of the Beaton Residence located in West Vancouver, B.C in
September 1971. The architect on the project was Arthur Mudry.

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, Bedford Glen

The folder consists of one black and white photograph of The Bedford Glen. The Bedford Glen (Annau Associates, 1976) is a remarkable ensemble that won several architectural awards. It's such a strange building, almost wedding-cake in its exuberance with those arches and a remarkable bridge spanning its units, underpasses, and overpasses, yet it holds together.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Berkeley Private Hospital

Folder consits of 6 black and white photographs of the Berkeley Private Hospital in White Rock B.C. The architect was Fred Thorton Hollingsworth who designed and built the building in 1961. The photographs seem to have been for a 1965 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, Blackcomb

This building features western Red Cedar as its main material and reveals it's flexibility. In the Blackcomb style, this material is extremely durable and can withstand the variable conditions of the mountain.

Canadian Architect

Bowen Island, residence

This folder consists of photographs of the Bowen Island residence. Situated on two acres of a rocky island near Vancouver, the house consists of four connecting pavilions, design to give privacy to the owners while accommodating servants, guests and grandchildren. The design is Massey Medal winner of 1965. The review article was published in Canadian Architect in February 1965, p. 55. There are some B&W photos and a drawing plan of the residence.

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, Burrard Marina

Located within the inner harbour of Vancouver, at the area known as False Creek, it functions to satisfy the needs of the average citizen with small boats (up to 40 ft.). The Marina is equipped with toilet facilities, a lounge with food vending machines, office for the manager and a caretaker suite.

Fulker, John

Burnaby, Buttjes Group Condos

The two towers with a total area of 32,500m2 will house 294 units, including 8 luxury penthouse suites and an extensive recreation facility.

Tregillas, Henry

Port Moody, Cecile Drive residence

Typed note on verso:
NATIONAL DESIGN AWARD 1969
This condominium housing - a pioneer of it's kind in BC, through the simple use of local materials and good siting achieves a very natural architectural character. The retention of treed areas, the consideration of grading for access, and siting for views, indicate the high degree of attention given to living considerations. The suites are well planned. The vertical stacking of the suites was necessitated by requirements in the early BC strata titles act concerning individual ownership which have since been changed. Good housing provided at a reasonable cost.

Central Mortgage & Housing Corporation

Victoria, Centennial Square Project

Mayor Roderick Finlayson's first objective after his election to office in January of 1878 was to erect a city hall. Overriding the opinions of the townsfolk who considered the whole idea an unnecessary extravagance, $10,000 was allocated and a competition announced for plans. The winner was John Teague. City Hall was to contain a corn market, surveyors' quarters, apartments for the assessor, a jail, a police court, a council chamber, committee rooms, and a museum gallery. The final form was a rectangular block, now comprising the south wing of the present City Hall. A good example of the Second Empire style, it is built in red brick with a tin mansard roof. The 1881 addition consisted of a small wing on the south-west corner for the Fire Department. In 1891 City Council approved a bylaw for the borrowing of $35,000 for the completion of the northeast addition. The new wing added to the existing building constitutes the present City Hall as it is seen today. In 1891, the main entrance was moved to the base of the tower block at the center of the Douglas elevation. The facade is divided into three bays, the projecting center bay carries the thrust of the 140-foot-tall brick and stone tower block. The entrance is further accented by a balustrade over the indented porch. On May 6, 1891, C.E. Redfern was awarded the contract for the installation of the clock which had been manufactured by Messrs. Gillet & Johnson of Croydon, Surrey, England. Four 500-pound dials each 706 inches in diameter and the 2,170 pound bell had to be lifted into place. The clock requires winding once a week. Since 1891 there have been no major alternations, except those connected with the Centennial Square project in 1963. At this time the interior was completely renovated and an International Style addition was constructed at the west end. This was carried out by the architectural firms of Wade, Stockdill, Armour & Partners and R.W. Siddall & Associates, under the direction of Rod Clack, city architectural consultant and director of special planning projects.
Architect: John Teague
Additions: Wade, Stockdill, Armour, R.W. Sidall, R. Clack

http://www.maltwood.uvic.ca/Architecture/ma/urban_planning/centennial_square/city_hall.html
The focal point is a fountain, its balustraded rim reminiscent of pieces from Oscar Niemeyer's Brazilia scheme (1958), and the mosaic concrete totems by local artist J.C.S. Wilkinson. The fountain was a centennial gift to the City from neighbouring municipalities.
This folder also contains photographs of the Civic Square in Victoria, B.C from June 1965.

Fulker, John

Whistler, Chateau Whistler Resort

Folder contains three photographic prints of the Chateau Whistler Resort. CAPTION verso:
An artist's impression of what the Chateau Whistler Resort will look like when it opens in late 1989 at Whistler, BC. Canadian Pacific Hotels Corporation is investing $50 million in construction of the 400 room luxury resort facility. It features a year round resort hotel. Chateau Whistler Resort's facilities inclde four outdoor and two covered tennis courts, indoor and outdoor swimming pools and other recreational facilities, including plans for an 18 hole golf course.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Choklit Park townhouses

A winner of the Canadian Architect award of excellence in 1983, the Choklit Park Townhouse project comprises four townhouses on a 15 by 33m site. This site, which has a 15m vertical drop, overlooks downtown, False Creek and the North Shore mountains. Folder also contains 1 colour photograph taken of the Choklit Park Townhouses in October 1985.

Sherlock, John

Vancouver, Christ Church Cathedral

In 1971 a feasibility study investigated the possibility of demolishing the existing church and placing it in the body of a multi-storied high rise complex designed by Arthur Erickson. Although the redevelopment was supported by the majority of the
congregation, it was opposed by the public, and after much lobbying, in 1976 the cathedral was named a
Heritage building in the municipality of Vancouver and the Province of British Columbia. Architecture firm on the project was Erikson/Massey Architects of Vancouver, B.C.

Canadian Architect

Coquitlam, City hall

Folder contains 1 black and white photographic print of a miniature model of the Coquitlam City Hall. Photograph is from the CA Magazine Yearbook 1967.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Courthouse

The provincial law courts are housed in a building designed by well known architect Arthur Erickson who created a building with an incredibly massive glass roof. From the aerial view you can also see the equally large reflecting pond that stretches out above Smythe St. Many of the lawyers and judges have lunch at the restaurant that looks out over this water feature and is open to the general public.
Folder also includes a photographic print of the Habitat Pavilion from June 1980 issue of Canadian Architect magazine. The project received an honour award and was built by Arthur Erikson Architects. The owner of the building is the Government of Canada.

Scott, Simon

Vancouver, Dalby residence

Folder contains 4 b&w photographs of the Dalby residence in Vancouver, B.C. This water front home was built on a rock ledge to avoid disturbing the natrual gorwth and to necessitate little rock blasting. The architect was Fred Thornton Hollingsworth.

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, Danto house

Folder contains 6 black and white photographic prints of the Danto Residence. The concept of the Danto house was a grand staircase-- a series of terraces following the slope of the site. Architect was Arthur Erikson.

Schiffer, Fred S.

Vancouver, Denman Place

CHDC Winner of Award for Residential Design 1971
Verso: "An excellent mixed-use complex of housing, shops, restaurants, theatre and hotel space which relates well to its urban setting and serves as a catalyst for the improved development of the area." Developer of the project was Confederation Life Assurance Co. of Toronto, Ontario. Designers were Norman S. Jones, MRAIC of Vancouver and James A. Murray, FRAIC of Toronto, Ontario.

Pullan, Selwyn

Cloverdale, Dogwood Gardens

The folder consists of 4 b&w photographs of Dogwood Gardens at 5850 177b Street is an 86 unit complex in the heart of Cloverdale. This complex boasts many great features for families including an outdoor pool, clubhouse, fish pond, putting green, playground, plenty of gardens and greenspace. Close to shopping, transit, restaurants, schools and parks.
Dogwood Gardens was the Canadian Housing Design Council winner of the award for Residential design in 1971. Caption on verso: "A fine example of medium density housing. The random placing of blocks around four activity areas offer unit variety and identity with special inner spaces. Although a number of different materials and forms are used this is done with great skill and there is a consistant and unified whole to the housing."

Boutry, Bryan

Victoria, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory

Completed in 1918, by the Canadian Government this observatory was proposed and designed by John S. Plaskett in 1910 with the support of the International Union for Cooperation in Solar Research, when the 72-inch aperture telescope was constructed, it was planned to be the largest telescope in the world but delays meant it saw first light after the Hooker 100-inch telescope.
The Centre of the Universe is the public interpretive centre for the observatory. The centre features interactive exhibits about astronomy, the work of the observatory and its parent organization, the NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics. There are also tours of the telescope and programs in the planetarium and video theatre.
The folder consists of one b&w photograph of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. On verso: "new housing for 16in. telescope operated by Dominion Astrophysical Observatory on top of Little Saanich Mountain near Victoria, B.C. is constructed of fir plywood structural assemblies. Architect was James Langford, Chief Architect with Department of Public Works, while Roger Kemble of Kemble-Webber Architects, Vancouver, was the consultant. Johnson Construction Ltd., of Victoria, were the general contractors.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, East Asiatic Centre

The East Asiatic House, built in 1963 at 1201 West Pender Street in Vancouver was architect Gerald Hamilton's first largescale exercise in New Formalism. Hamilton broke away from the typical single slab tower, instead framing a low banking pavilion with two adjoining office blocks. Sculptural wall panels of white marble create a richly textured effect and seem to float above the emerald green arched columns of the ground floor. The building's raised podium allowed an intimate front courtyard several feet above street level, the sense of calm repose accentuated by extensive plantings, fountains, and the requisite abstract sculpture.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Eaton Centre

Although the idea for Metrotown was first expressed in the 1970s, the building itself opened in 1986 and was soon served by the Expo Line of the new SkyTrain system. In the ensuing twenty years, the complex developed into three distinct but adjoining malls - Metropolis at Metrotown, Metrotown Centre, and Station Square. Today, Eaton Centre, Metrotown serves as the city?s commercial and retail anchor. The mall also includes two large office towers, which by 2001 were home to the head offices for Shaw Cable and TransLink. http://www.heritageburnaby.ca/EN/main/research.html

Higinbotham, Pat

Vancouver, Edgemont Terrace

Folder consists of 4 b&w photographs of Edgemond Terrace in Vancouver, B.C. The architects on the project were Wilding & Norman S. Jones, M.A.I.B.C., President.

Mr. Jones received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Later he was awarded the B.C. Electric Post Graduate Fellowship for study in Europe. Mr. Jones became a registered member of the Architectural Institute of B.C. and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada in May 1960. He has been in private practise continuously
since that time.

Awards and Recognitions:

Canadian Housing Design Council Awards
Edgemont Terraces, North Vancouver, BC

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Emily Carr School of Art

Folder consists of 6 photographic prints of the Emily Carr School of Art. The Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design is located on Granville Island, a highly successful urban precinct on the waterfront in the heart of Vancouver. The building context ranges from the small scale of single-story shops to the industrial scale of a concrete plant and the superscale of a major high-level bridge which spans over the island. The natural context of the waterfront adds a marine character to the island and the buildings which occupy it, which has both industrial and recreational dimensions.

The fundamental design problem for the building was an urban one. The building program required 60 000 square feet of studios and associated spaces, including a library and large lecture theatre, and 255 parking stalls located across the street from existing college facilities. Because subsurface conditions make building a parking garage entirely below grade impracticable, the fundamental problem was to position a college building on top of a three-story parking garage while at the same time addressing the varying scales and pedestrian-oriented character of Granville Island.

The disposition of the building volumes mediates the building?s bulk and the impact of the parking garage on the surrounding streets. The library is located at ground level, screening the garage and providing a public amenity at street level. The remaining program components are located above street level and grouped around a double-height glazed concourse space.

As is typical of construction on Granville Island, corrugated metal cladding is used for insulated walls, services are generally left exposed, and detailing is direct.

Architect: Patkau Architects / Toby Russell Buckwell and Partners.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Era townhouses

Folder consists of 5 b&w photographic prints of the Era Townhouses in Vancouver, B.C. The architecture firm on the project was Hawthorn Mansfield Towers Architects of Vancouver. The owner of the townhouses project was Werner Kahn. The project received an honour award from Canadian Architect magazine in June 1980.

Bryan, Jack

Expo '86 (Vancouver, BC)

Photographs of different pavilions and models for EXPO '86 in Vancouver: Australian, Canadian North, Ontario, Alberta, Singapore and Switzerland. There is also an envelope containing a number of negative prints depicting the different pavilions, models and sites for EXPO '86.

Vancouver, False Creek

Folder consists of a number of photographs of the False Creek townhouses and the surroudning urban landscape. Many of the photographs contain caption and information for articles on the back.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Filberg house

Filberg House is an ethereal, glass-walled pavilion with undulating 14-foot ceilings and views that stretch across mountains, water and a seemingly infinite sky. The residence, hailed in a 1961 issue of Canadian Homes magazine as ''the most fabulous house in Canada,'' was an important early project of Arthur Erickson, the globe-trotting Vancouver architect whose recent work includes the Museum of Glass that opened last July in Tacoma, Wash.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/23/arts/art-architecture-canada-s-most-fabulous-house-makes-a-comeback.html?sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all

Scott, Simon

Vancouver, Forbes residence

File consists of 1 b&w photograph of the Forbes Residence in Vancouver, B.C. Architect was James K.M. Cheng. Appears to have been used in the June 1980 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Forrest residence

Folder contains 3 b&w photographic prints of the Forrest Residence in Vancouver, B.C. The residence was designed by Thompson, Berwick, Pratt & Partners, Architects Engineers Planners. In a website pertaining to the photographer Selwyn Pullan, it features the architecture of numerous west-coast architects."His shot of Ron Thompson Forrest residence in West Vancouver makes it look like a living creature about to spring into the sky."
"As a body of work, his photos of Vancouver's modern architectural movement are a one-of-a-kind treasure trove, the primary photographic history of the heyday of Vancouver modernism."

http://blog.ounodesign.com/2009/08/22/vancouvers-architectural-photographer-selwyn-pullan/

Pullan, Selwyn

Vancouver, F.P housing project

This dense 100 unit public housing project will provide for single parent families and low income larger families. The idea is to integrate families with similar needs and life styles and to help to minimize stresses associated with public housing.

CA Magazine May 1972

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Garden apartments

Terrace houses situated with sea frontage, located just 3 kilometres from the city's centre. View over English Bay and Northshore mountains.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Gastown parking garage

Folder contains 1 print of the Gastown Parking Garage in Vancouver, B.C. Caption on photo reads: "typical Gastown industrial building; note cornices, windows, plaster modelling and delineated base."
CA Magazine June 1985
"To express both mobility and urabanity in one building immediately suggests a degree of conflict."

Brooks, Roger

Kelowna, Caravel Hotel

Folder contains 1 b&w photograph of the interior of the Caravel Hotel in Kelowna, B.C. The photo appears to have been taken for the November 1965 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Fulker, John

Maillardville, Good Shepherd Convent

Folder contains 3 b&w photographs of the Good Shepard Convent. Built in a French speaking town near New Westminster, BC, this convent is an adaptation on the Californian Mission style. The altar is constructed from local light grey granite, the top polished, the base unpolished.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Graham residence

Folder contains 6 b&w photographs of the Graham Residence in West Vancouver, B.C. featured in CA Magazine July 1966. Architect was Arthur Erikson. The architectural marvel that Arthur Erickson has credited with kick-starting his career is in danger of being torn down. "The David Graham house in 1963 launched my reputation as the architect you went to when you had an impossible site, Erickson is quoted as saying in 1988's The Architecture of Arthur Erickson."

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ouno/3551583809/ http://blog.ounodesign.com/2009/05/20/goodbye-arthur-erickson/

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Grant residence

Folder contains 3 b&w photographs of the Smith Residence in South Delta, B.C. The architect was John Kay who is known for his organic architecture. Photographs are from CA Magazine September 1970.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Granville Island

The folder consists of various photographs of Granville Island, B.C. The design and master plan for the redevelopment of Granville Island in the 1970s was visionary and defining. The formerly dilapidated industrial site was transformed into a vibrant and livable community, which set a worldwide precedent for mixed-use waterfront environments. Today, HBBH continues its urban design work on Granville Island, working with the Government of Canada to ensure the Island remains a lively and productive community.

Fulker, John; Koppers, & MSL Productions

Vancouver, Hauer residence

Folder contains 5 b&w photographs of the Hauer Residence, Vancouver, B.C. Architects were Erickson/Massey Architects of Vancouver, B.C.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Hornby Court

Folder contains a photograph of a drawing of Hornby Court in Vancouver, B.C. The architecture firm was the Buttjes Group: Architects & Planners of Vancouver, B.C.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, Hotel Europe

Hotel Europe is a six-story heritage building located at 43 Powell Street (at Alexander) in the Gastown area of Vancouver, British Columbia. The building was commissioned by hotelier Angelo Calori and built in 1908 - 1909 by Parr and Fee Architects. Situated on a triangular lot, the building is designed in the flatiron style. It was the first reinforced concrete structure to be built in Canada and the earliest fireproof hotel in Western Canada. Contractors had to be brought in from Cincinnati, Ohio for the necessary expertise; the Ferro-Concrete Construction Company began this project six years after constructing the first tall concrete building in the world.

With funding from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the building was renovated in 1983 as affordable housing with A. Ingre and Associates as the project designers. The residential units are now managed by the Affordable Housing Society. A beer parlour formerly existed below the ground floor, which included areaways extending underneath the above sidewalks. To prevent a cave-in from the weight of pedestrians and above ground traffic, the City of Vancouver filled the areaway in with pea gravel at a cost of $215,000, which presumably can be easily removed in the event of future restoration.
The Hotel Europe was one of the filming location for the suspense movie The Changeling. In it, the building houses the Seattle Historical Society, but the hotel sign can be seen on the right side facade of the building in some takes. Some scenes are set on its spectacular roof terrace.

Canadian Architect

Vancouver, IBM offices

Folder contains 5 b&w photographs of IBM Vancouver offices. The architecture firm responsible was Thompson, Berwick & Practt Architects of Vancouver, B.C.

Selwyn, Pullan

Burnaby, Ismaili Centre

The Burnaby Jamatkhana is located on a 1.4 ha site in a residential suburb of Vancouver. The building concept was generated by Islamic architectural principles. Thus, building is totaly symmetrical, with a plan composed of two squares.

Otte, Gary

Vancouver, Institute of Chartered Accountants

Folder contains 1 b&w photograph of the interior of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Vancouver, B.C. Image was taken for Canadian Architect magazine, Oct. 1966. Architecture firm was Birmingham & Wood, Architects and Planners.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, John Grinnell residence

Folder contains 3 b&w photographs of the John Grinnell Residence of Vancouver, B.C. The residence was the 1964 Massey award.The architecture firm responsible for the project was Thompson, Berwick, Pratt & Partners, Architects, Engineers, Planners.

Pullan, Selwyn

Resultados 1 a 100 de 1725