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Special Vocational Schools (New York and elsewhere)

File contains a newspaper article about the High School of Performing Arts in New York, New York, and a copy of the Educational Studies and Documents No. 36 "Technical and Vocational Education in the U. S. A" - a bibliographical survey prepared by the United States Office of Education.

Miscellaneous American theatre programs

Series consists of 1 file of 7 theatre programs published in the United States of America by the following theatres and theatre companies: 1 Artpark (1994), 1 Buffalo Centre for the Performing Arts (1979), 1 Ford's Theatre Society (1982), 2 Hangar Theatre (1987, 1991), 1 Shubert Theatre (1991), and 1 Weber Theatre Wheaton College (2003).

Detective Fiction Weekly, Vol. CVII, No. 6 / The Red Star News Company, New York

A magazine devoted to short stories of fiction, featuring:
The Whisper-Men by Judson P. Philips (Part 1 of 6)
A Very High-Hat Mob by Edgar Franklin
Long Shot by Richard Sale
The Killer Poet (True Story) by Joseph Gollomb
Illustrated Crimes by Stookie Allen
Key Witness by Richard Howells Watkins
The Twenty-Third Corpse by Oscar Schisgall (Part 2 of 3)
Plenty Smooth by Edward Parrish Ware
Death Breaks Even by Herbert Koehl
The Clue of the Shattered Bottle (True Vignette) by James W. Booth
Devil's Luck by Tom Roan
They're Swindling You! (Feature) by Frank Wrentmore
Solving Cipher Secrets (Feature) by M. E. Ohaver
Civil Service Q & A (Feature)
Flashes from Readers

The Red Star News Company

Kodak Advantix 200

File consists of 9 rolls of Kodak Advantix ISO 200 APS colour print film in original packaging. 3 rolls have 15 exposures, 3 rolls have 15 exposures, 3 with 25 exposures, and 3 with 40 exposures.

Munro, Allan

Portrait of young boy with stick and hat

Item is a cream cabinet card with scalloped, gold-leafed edges and gold letterpress at bottom, "Goodwin/ EXTRA FINISH/ SYRACUSE, N.Y." Photograph is a full length portrait of a young boy, probably about 5 years old, wearing a lace shirt with dark cuffs and a dark ascot tie, trousers cut off at the knee, and holding a stick in one hand and a hat in another. He sits on the edge of a stone pillar with a background of abstracted leaves for a backdrop. On verso, an etching of a waterfall with the text "Goodwin./ 314 SO SALINA ST/ ART Photography./ INSTANTANEOUS PROCESS". At the top edge, handwritten in ink, "Georgia Wilson".

[Portrait of two women]

Item has a cream card-frame embossed opening, with embossed letters "Potter's Patent March 7 1865." Which is how we dated the tintype. Photograph is a studio portrait of two women, both standing, side by side. Both women wear hats. One on left wears a dark shirtwaist, with a striped full skirt with hair tied neatly back and little bow at the neck. Woman on right has a dark dress, buttons down the front with a small white collar, in fashion in the 1860s. Her hair is shoulder lenght ringlets, also in fashion in the 1860s. Both have pink tinted cheeks.

Kodak Reference Handbooks and Technical Data

Sub-sub-series contains publications produced by Kodak for the consumer between 1940 and about 1995. Publications are pamphlets ranging from 1 to over 50 pages and intended to be stored in a series of specialized binders. The information pamphlets were published in series with an alpha numeric code, which form the sub series in this collection. Customers subscribed to receive updates based on their specific interest. Early publications, from the 1940's, were simply titled "Kodak Photographic Handbook" and later versions included: Kodak Reference Handbook, Kodak Industrial Handbook, Kodak Color Handbook, Kodak Graphic Arts Handbook, Kodak Professional and Industrial Data, and Kodak Scientific and Technical Data.

Each pamphlet has a unique, alpha-numeric Pamphlet Number, following classification scheme devised by Kodak to make ordering and subscription easy for clients. Schema is as follows:
A - Amateur Photography (also under KW)
AV - Audiovisual Programs from Kodak
B - Filters
C - Arctic Photography
CC - Publications about Kodak
D - Microfilming and Reprography Materials (also under P); Dental Radiography
E - Color Photography
F - Black and White Film
G - Black and White Papers, Industrial Photography, and Instrumentation
H - Motion Picture, TV Applications (also under D and S)
J - Chemicals, Processing, Silver Recovery, and Waste Disposal
JJ - Kodak Laboratory Chemicals
K - Darkroom Design and Construction
KW - Amateur Photography )see section A also)
L - Index
LC - Library of Creative Photography
M - Aerial, Applied, and Medical Photography
N - Medical and Scientific Photography
O - Professional Studio Photography
P - Instrumentation and Industrial Photography (see section G also)
Q - Graphic Arts
R - Exposure and Processing Guides
S - Audiovisual Applications (also under T and V)
T - Audiovisual, Education, and Professional Video Tape Products (also under AV, and V)
TD - Graphic Arts (see sections G, P, and Q also)
U - Optical Materials
V - Audiovisual (also under AV, S, and T)
W - Industrial Radiography, Chemistry
X - International Publications
Y - Processing and Equipment Record Forms
Z - Processing Monitoring Systems, Self-Instruction Materials, Literature Library Collections

No. 1A Pocket Kodak Junior

Item is a brown folding camera with black bellows; for 2.5" x 4.25" exposures on 116 film. The shutter was made by the Eastman Kodak Co. in the United States.

No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak

Item is a metal folding camera with black bellows for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures. Camera uses a Pocket Automatic shutter and has win sprung struts for the lensboard.

National Graflex Series II

Item is a black single lens reflex camera for 2.25" x 2.5" exposures on 120 rollfilm. Camera uses a B&L Tessar f3.5/75 mm lens and a focal-plane shutter. The series II has cable release, mirror set lever at operator's left of hood and a sliding ruby window cover.

Premoette Junior No. 1A

Item is a leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The bellows are black and there is no track on the bed but the front standard fits into two slots at the front, one for objects 6 to 20 feet away and the other for objects that are further than 20 feet away. The camera is still in the original packaging with the accompanying instruction manual. The camera uses a ball bearing lens.

Premoette Junior

Item is a black leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The camera has no tracks on the bed but the front standard pulls out and clips into two slots at the front. The front slot is for taking photographs of objects that are 6 to 20 feet away and the back slot is for objects more than 20 feet away. The item uses a ball bearing lens.

Reversible Back Premo camera

Item is a folding field camera for exposures on 8x10 plates, manufactured by the Rochester Optical and Camera Company. Wood camera with red bellows and brass hardware. Created for advanced amateur and professional photographers, the back was reversible to allow the photographer to photograph in both landscape and portrait orientations and had adjustable tilt to account for distortion. Includes a Ross f8-64 lens.

Ansco Shur-Flash

Item is an inexpensive box camera made of fiberboard and covered with imitation leather. The camera has a Gallileo-type viewfinder only (no brilliant viewfinder), flash contacts, and a single speed shutter that is fast enough to accommodate bulb flashes. It used 120 size roll film.

Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic

Item is a folding trellis strut camera from the Vest Pocket series for 4.5 x 6 cm (1.77" x 2.36") exposures on 127 roll film. Lens is a Kodak Anastigmat 84mm f4.7, with a ball-bearing shutter with B,T, 1/25, 1/50, etc.. A case in included.

Kodak Medalist I

Item consists of a Kodak Medalist I. It is a 620 film, with a bright finder than attempts to combine the magnified rangefinder and the minified viewfinder. The camera was built during the war and was nicknamed the American Leica, for the design criteria that good pictures could save the lives of soldiers, and the Medalist could take them. It is a medium format, roll film camera with a sharp, multicoated lens, and a rigid aluminum and steel body. The camera has a unique double helical lens tube in place of cloth bellows.

Kodak B-C Flasholder

Item consists of a Kodak B-C Flasholder. It features a 22.5-volt battery-condenser system for dependable flash synchronization and can be used with most flash-synchronized cameras, such as the Brownie Six-20 models.

Image Arts

Brownie No. 2C Model A

Item consists of a Kodak No. 2-C Brownie Model A box camera. The camera used 130 roll film for an image size of 5.715 x 10.795 cm. It has a standard Meniscus achromatic lens and a rotary shutter.

Kodak Fiftieth Anniversary Box Brownie

Item consists of a Kodak Fiftieth Anniversary Brownie box camera. It was a commemorative edition Brownie camera that was handed out to children at fairs in the United States during the 1930s. The body of the camera is card covered in brown leatherette, and features a silver seal for the fiftieth anniversary of the Eastman Kodak Company, from 1880 to 1930. It is a simple camera that used 120 medium format film.

Kodak Handy Reflectors

Item consists of One Pair Kodak Handy Reflectors ...And One Handy Measure for Picture Making at Night. Included in a yellow and green paper envelope with black text are 2 foldable reflecting cones, 2 metal rings, and ABC intruction cards.

Image Arts

Magazine Cyclone No. 5

Item is a black leather wooden box-style magazine camera for 4x5 inch plates. The camera has a meniscus lens, a time and instantaneous shutter, and two reflecting type viewfinders. This camera model was made by the Western Camera Manufacturing Company prior to 1899 when it became part of the Rochester Optical & Camera Company.

Kodak 500 Projector

Item consists of a Kodak 500 Projector. It was the considered the most portable Kodak projector yet, weighing just over 4 kilograms and featuring a self-contained carrying case. This item has a Kodak Readymatic Changer system that could hold up to 36 slides, but the Kodak 500 Projector was also made with a metal automatic magazine changer that stored up to 30 slides, allowing purchasers to choose their preferred slide-handling system.

Image Arts

Kodak Brownie Movie Projector Model I

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Movie Projector, the first model. The projector was manufactured from October 1952 to February 1955. It is for 8mm film, has an f/2 lens, and a max reel of 200 ft. It originally marketed for $62.50. It has a brown metal and plastic body with a removable protective cover that has an operation manual laminated inside.

Image Arts

No. 3A Autographic Kodak camera, Model C

Item is a folding camera with black leatherette case and leather bellows. Features a cord with metal push button shutter-release. Fitted with a Kodak Antistigmat lens f7.7 (170mm), No. 11592. Took Autographic film No. A-122. Serial no. 652261.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera. It was manufactured from 1961 to 1967. It is an 8mm camera with a P. Angenieux Paris f.6.5-52mm 1:1.8 Angenieux-Zoom lens with original lens cap. It used a clockwork motor and shot 25 feet rolls of 8mm film at 16 frames per second. Some paint is beginning to peel. When the camera was first released it cost approximately $139.95, about $900 today.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Kodak XL330

Item consists of a Kodak XL 330. It is a silent super 8 motion picture camera with a Kodak Ektar f/1.2 9mm lens and fixed focus. It has an adjustable eyepiece, a filming speed of 18 frames per second, a film counter, a battery check button and a tripod socket. It works with 4 AA batteries.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Analyst Super 8

Item is a motion picture camera with black plastic body. In original box (opened) with manual folded inside. Used Kodak Super 8 film cartridge and was powered by 4 AA batteries (removed). Comes with Kodak Zoom lens f1.9 (13-28mm). Large red bulb on front.

Eastman Kodak Company

Univex Model A8

Item is a die-cast metal cine camera with a black finish. It has an interchangeable f5.6 Ilex Univar lens and a collapsible viewfinder. The camcorder uses Univex 30' patented spools of Single-8 film.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

Kodak Fling 35

Item consists of a one-time use camera loaded with a 24 exposure roll of 400 ISO 35 mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is April 1990. 10 exposures left. Slogan on box reads: The Camera and Film All in One

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Advantix C700

Item consists of a Kodak Advantix C700. It is an advanced photo system camera that is fully automatic, with self timer and date and time printing. It features an auto-focusing 30-60 mm zoom atmospheric lens and a built-in flip-up flash unit. Silver in colour. Uses 1 3-volt lithium battery. Allows for three different picture sizes: classic, group and panoramic.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Disc camera (demonstration model)

Item consists of a demonstration verion of the Kodak Disc camera. Disc cameras were compact fixed-focus cameras with built-in flash that used 11x8mm film that came in the form of a flat disc. Camera body is made of clear plastic so the internal mechanics can be seen. Made in U.S.A.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Duaflex III camera

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 620 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder. Camera has a fixed focus Kodet lens.

Long Focus Premo

Item is a medium format studio camera. It resembles the Premo Sr., but features an extra long bellows that extends out the back of the camera. It is made of wood and polished laquered brass, and the body is covered with fine black leather. It is fitted with a Kodak Ball Bearing Shutter and a Kodak Anastigmat f7.7/170 mm lens.

Kodak Bullet

Item is a small hand held camera with black plastic and metal casing. Winding knob on bottom left and metal latch for attaching a flash on top (no flash included). Around lens opening, "BULLET CAMERA" is printed. Designed in art deco style.

Eastman Kodak Company

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