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Man behind camera with boy

Item consists of a board, landscape poster featuring an image of a man and a boy standing in front of a tent and behind a camera. The man is covered by the camera blanket as he prepares his photograph, while the boy stands behind, holding a plate holder.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Records pertaining to the Photographic Historical Society of Canada and other camera clubs

File contains documents related to the Photographic Historical Society of Canada and other camera clubs. Kodak Canada had a longstanding relationship with the PHSC and hosted the organization's 25th anniversary celebration. File includes: flyers and other promotional material for PHSC events; membership forms; a copy of the Sept/Oct 1999 25th anniversary special issue of Photographic Canadiana; a PHSC calendar for 2000; a flyer for "Old time" photo portraits produced by PHSC member Wayne Sproul; a brochure for the Toronto Camera Club lecture series; lists of camera clubs in Canada; and other ephemera.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Reproduced articles, catalogues, and magazine covers

File contains miscellaneous print-outs and photocopies of articles, catalogues, and magazine covers published both by Kodak and externally. Items were likely used as reference materials by Kodak Canada's communications department or by the Kodak Canada Heritage Collection and Museum. Topics include: photographic history and production; Kodak history; George Eastman; and others.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Photograph & Film Technology Collection

  • 2005.005
  • Collectie
  • 1880 - 2008

This collection consists of photographic films, papers and chemicals used by various individuals for amateur or professional purposes. The collection also includes camera accessories, flash equipment, various lenses, exposure meters (light meters) and equpiment used for darkroom processing and printing. This is a growing collection, created to help preserve the materials used for analogue photographic developing, printing and enlarging.

Early cameras

This series consists of original and duplicate early cameras from the beginning of the history of photography. Based on the basic design of the camera obscura and produced between about 1820 and 1870, these simple devices were usually solid or sliding box cameras with uncomplicated lenses. The shutter was normally outside of the lens, in the form of a lens cap that was simple removed and replaced for exposure, or a rotating metal plate on the front of the lens, which held the aperture. These cameras mainly predated dry plate and flexible film photography, and were used to take Daguerreotype, wet-plate and salted paper photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Mousetrap camera [replica]

Item is a small, wooden camera obscura with a single meniskus lens to demonstrate function of matt glass focusing screen and focal length. It is a replica built in the style of the small "mousetrap" cameras designed by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid 1830's. They were simple wooden boxes with a single lens used to expose paper negatives, sensitized by silver nitrate (the calotype or Talbotype process). Exposures often took hours, and Talbot had several of the cameras made by a local joiner near his country home in Laycock, Wiltshire.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Wooden camera obscura [replica]

Cameras of this kind were used during the 18th and 19th century by artists and travelling tourists to sketch landscapes and buildings. A piece of transparent paper was placed on the matte screen. One could now trace the outlines of the subject as a guide for later elaborate sketching or painting. It was the predecessor of photographic cameras which, after 1839, could record the image by the reaction of chemical substances to light. Later the simple meniscus lenses were replaced by more corrected lens elements.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Dry plate cameras

This series contains cameras designed for use with commercially manufactured dry plate negatives. Produced between about 1880 and 1900, these cameras began to be marketed to amateur photographers due to the relative ease of using dry plates. Exposure times shortened, necessitating faster shutters, within the lens or camera. The equipment also became more compact, allowing for hand-held photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

ICA Lloyd 575 folding camera

Item is a camera produced by ICA with a Carl Zeisa lens. The camera uses [xfilm], has [X] lenses, [X] shutter speed of [X]. Item also comes with a leather case.

Zeiss Super Ikonta C (folding camera)

Item is a folding camera for use with Zeiss Ikon B2 6x9cm 120 roll film. The camera includes a Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f3.5, 105mm lens and Compur rapid shutter with speeds from 1 second to 1/400, plus bulb setting.

Kodak Six-20 Camera

Item is a folding camera with an enameled art-deco sides. The camera uses 620 film for 2.25" 3.25" exposures. The camera also has a fold down metal strut to support self-erecting front. The lens on the camera is a Kodak Anastigmat f6.3.

Box and snapshot roll film cameras

Series contains simple, snapshot cameras designed for mass public consumption, taking advantage of the new flexible roll film that was developed in 1883. The box camera was a logical follow up from the original simple camera obscuras, often having only one shutter speed, simple lenses with minimal f-stop capabilities and manual winds.

The trend arguably began with George Eastman's in 1888 with the first, amateur, handheld camera, "The Kodak", which came pre-loaded with 100 exposures. After exposure, the entire outfit was returned to the Eastman Kodak company, where the film was developed, prints made and sent back to the customer with the camera, now re-loaded with more film.

Many millions of similar cameras were sold, both high and low end, manufactured by different companies and eventually developing into the modern point-and-shoot camera.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash

Item is a brown moulded plastic box camera designed by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey Jr. for use with 127 film (4x6 cm exposures). The camera features a fixed speed rotary shutter and plastic lens. Item does not include the flash unit. This model was made in Canada, at the Canadian Kodak plant in Toronto.

Detective cameras

Items in this series are photographic devices designed to be inconspicuous, intended for photographers to make candid exposures without the subject being aware. The first detective cameras appeared with the production of commercially available dry plates and designs were simple box camera style constructions. These were, in fact, very similar to standard cameras of the time, but were smaller, handheld and able to make exposures relatively quickly. As smaller, flexible film materials became available, these cameras began to be produced disguised as objects such as pocket watches, ties, books, hats, pens and walking sticks.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Scovill & Adams Company

Panoramic cameras

Series contains cameras designed to take wide-angle photographs (images that are least twice as wide as they are tall). Cameras of this nature began to be produced soon after photography was invented, as photographers have always wanted to capture large group portraits, landscape views and skylines. Panoramic photographs are achieved by stitching several exposures together to create one image or with purpose built cameras of several designed, including banquet (similar to standard cameras with wider aspect ratios, designed to take photographs of large groups indoors), short rotation (uses a curved film plane, swinging lens and split shutter that the lens rotates around), and full or long rotation (capable of producing 360 degree views by rotating the camera and film past the shutter).

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Miniature and sub-miniature cameras

This series contains cameras designed to take photographs on flexible film sized smaller than 135 format film (24mm x 36mm). The size of the camera also tended to be very small, and often simply designed. While several companies manufactured high quality miniature cameras (including Minox and Rollei), many others were cheaply made and did not produce relatively poor results.

Film formats for miniature cameras were often priority, created by manufactures for their cameras specifically, and included the following sizes: 10mm x 14xx (16mm film), 13mm x 17mm film (110 film cartridges), 14mm x 14mm (used by "Hit" type cameras), 8mm x 11mm cartridge roll film (Minox), 11mm x 8mm disc film (Kodak).

Miniature cameras gained a reputation as "spy" cameras, and while some of the higher quality ones (including the Minox) were used by government agencies, most were simply for surreptitious, amateur use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Professional and press cameras

Series contains cameras designed to fulfill specific, professional functions such as surveying, aerial photography, studio portraits and press work. These cameras are often the best items in the manufacturers line, offering more features and a sturdier construction than their amateur counterparts.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Stereoscopic and multi lens cameras

Series contains cameras that have with more than one lens, to create multiple images on the same light sensitive film or plate. These cameras were designed for several purposes, the most popular being the stereoscopic, or three-dimensional, image. Most stereo cameras work by taking two simultaneous images from slightly varying points of view that correspond to the distance between the human eyes. The images are then mounted side-by-side and viewed through a stereoscope (a system of two lenses that helps to converge the two photographs, to mimic the depth perception of binocular vision). Other three-dimensional cameras used four or more lenses to create images for lenticular prints.
Some multi-lens cameras were intended to create multiple copies of the same scene at one time, such as the gem tintype camera and passport camera, while others had shutters that took sequential shots to create images which show the passage of time on one frame.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Single lens reflex cameras

Series contains single lens reflex, or simply reflex, cameras. This deign used a mirror at a 45 degree angle to allow the photographer to look through the lens when composing the photograph, therefore seeing exactly what will appear on the film. Brilliant and sports style viewfinders only alllowed an approximation of the image alignment.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Praktica FX3

Item is an 35mm reflex camera with a waist-level viewfinder and a non auto-return mirror. Manufactured in Soviet controlled East Germany, the company and the Desden factory closed after reunification. The lens is a Meyer Gorlitz Domiplan 1:2.8/50mm.

Asahi Pentax 6 x 7

Item is a professional medium format single lens reflex camera for 6 x 7 cm images on 120 or 220 roll film. This camera has a design similar to a 35mm camera with interchangeable Takumar lenses and range finders. It has a Penta Prism viewfinder, a wooden handle and a Takumar 6 x 7 1 :3.5 55 mm wide angle lens.

Salyut Kiev 88C

Item is a medium format, single lens reflex replica of the Swedish Hasselblad 1600 F camera manufactured in Russia. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Shutter is a foil focal plane style. Camera kit includes 2 film backs, an eye level viewfinder and 80 mm 2.8 lens.

Kalimar Reflex

Item is a single lens reflex camera 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 roll film. Made by Fujita Optical Company for Kalimar (in the USA), the cloth focal plane shutter allows exposures from B to 1/500 sec. Film counter set manually at the first exposure (start at arrow on film back) Sports style viewfinder on viewer shaft.

Exakta Varex 500

Item is a postwar model camera, made in occupied East Germany. is possibly a variant of the VX 500 , but not exactly like it. The prism can be removed, shutter speeds are B, Flash, 1/30 to 1/500 sec, double flash sync contact at left side, lens is West German Schneider Zreuznach Xenon 50mm f1.9.

Twin lens reflex cameras

Series contains cameras designed with two identical lenses, mounted one above the other, for composition and the other for exposure. The twin-lens design allows the photographer a continuous view of the subject while photographing, as the 45 degree angled mirror is mounted to the viewing lens only and therefore does not have to list out of the way during exposure, as in single lens reflex designs. Most designs used a waist level viewfinder with a ground glass.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Ikoflex II camera

Item is a medium format twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format roll film, produced by Zeiss Ikon. Model number 252/16 stamped underneath. Lens is a Triotar 75mm, f3.5 with a compur 1 to 1/300 shutter.

Rolleiflex Grey Baby

Item is a knob-advance twin lens reflex camera for 4 x 4 cm exposures on 127 format film. More compact than other twin lens reflex cameras, with a smaller negatives, the Grey Body has a Xenar f3.5 lens with a Syncrho compur shutter. The camera comes in a gray leather case and is equipped with an ultra violet Waltz filter and a lens hood.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Rolleicord Model 1

Item is an inexpensive version of the classic Rolleiflex medium format, twin lens reflex camera with fewer features. Shot 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 film; adapters could be obtained to shoot with 35mm and sheet film. The lens is a Zeiss Triotar f 3.8, 7.5cm with a 28.5 filter screw mount.

Foth-Flex II

Item is a medium format, twin lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format film. Lens is an Anistigmant 75mm, F2.5 with a cloth focal plane shutter (speeds from 2 second to 1/500th). This model of camera was available in both left and right-handed models.

Ikoflex III camera

Item is a medium format twin lens reflex camera manufactured by Zeiss Ikon. this is the last pre-war Ikoflex model, released in June of 1939 and made in Stuttgart, Germany. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 format roll film. The focusing screen has a condenser, magnifier for focusing and an “albada” finder (sports finder) in the hood. The viewing lens is an f3.5, 7.5 cm Teronar Anastigmat, lower lens is a Triotar f 3.5, 7.5 cm, Carl Zeiss Jena. Shutter is a Zeiss Ikon Compur Rapid, with speeds of 1 - 1/400 second and Bulb. Model number "853/16" is stamped under the lens assembly. Inside the viewfinder is a chart for seasonal exposure times.

Yashica LM

Item is a typical medium format twin lens reflex camera, designed to resemble a Rolleiflex. The "LM", for light meter, indicates that this model has a selenium cell exposure meter on top, with meter control on left side. Shutter: Copal MX. 80mm f3.5 Yashicor Lens.

Yashica Co. Ltd.

Mamiya c330

Item is a twin lens reflex medium format camera. Features on this model include a self-cocking winding crank with double exposure prevention.

Ricohmatic 225

Item is a Ricohmatic 225 in case. It is a 6x6 twin lens reflex camera made in Japan by Ricoh from 1959 to 1962. It is a synthesis of all the best technologies of the time. Used no. 120 film, but an optional kit was available to allow for the use of 135 films. Features an uncoupled selenium light meter, EVS numbering system with two ranges, Ricoh Viewer f 3.2/80mm lens/viewer, Seikosha SLV shutter with speeds 1-1/500 sec + B, aperture of 1/3.5 to 1/22, manual focusing, and crank film advance.

35mm cameras

Series contains cameras designed for use with standard 35mm (135 format) film. This became the most popular film and camera format, both among professionals and amateurs. Sturdy and multi-functional, with interchangeable lenses, these cameras found their way into civil wars, riots, and natural disasters around the necks of daring photojournalists as well as in homes and on vacation with advanced amateurs and photo-enthusiasts. Once exposed, the film was wound conveniently back into light-tight metal canisters that would protect the film until it could be developed.

For 35mm cameras marketed specifically to amateur photographers, see items in the Point-and-Shoot series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Leica R4

Item is a small hand held 35mm camera with metal and black vulcanite case. Two large metal rings attached on either side for a strap (not included). No lens included.

Leica iif

Item is a small, hand-held metal camera with black vulcanite cover on body. Summitar lens (f=5cm), strap and lens cap included.

Kodak Retina Ia

Item is a manual focus, folding 35mm camera with Synchro-Compur lens. Made in Germany. An instruction book is included. Made in Germany at Kodak AG.

Baldamatic

Item is a 35mm camera with rapid-wind key on base. It has a coupled selenium light meter. Lens is a Baldanar F2.8 45mm with a Prontomat shutter. Automatic exposure is regulated with shutter speeds from 1/30th - 1/300th of a second.

Balda-Werk

Yashica Minimatic - EL

Item is a 35 mm camera with a split image rangefinder and automatic exposure camera. A signal appears in the viewfinder if the film will be overexposed and the shutter cannot be released. Lens is a Yashinon - DX, f1.7, 45 mm.

Contaflex II

Item is a 35mm, single lens reflex camera manufactured by the Zeiss Ikon Company. This model, introduced in 1954, has a Tessar 45mm f2.8 lens and synchro-compur leaf shutter. The camera has a built-in, uncoupled selenium exposure meter and a telephoto lens attachment that slides over the original lens (Teleskop 1.7 x NR 2507248).

In-camera processing (instant) cameras

Series consists of cameras that combine exposure and development in one step to create photographs instantaneously.
While Polaroid is by far the most well known of these cameras, the first patent for instant photography was for the Dubroni, a French wet plate camera, designed so that the glass plate could be sensitized and developed by pouring the chemicals over the plate through a tube in the camera. Later cameras were developed so small tintypes (1895) and direct paper positives (1913) could be made quickly for tourists on busy streets.
But it was the Polaroid Corporation that made instant photography a household item, beginning in 1937 when Edwin Land's young daughter's desire to see her photograph immediately, inspired him to develop the Polaroid's first instant camera: the Land Camera.

The Heritage Collection also contains Kodak Instant Cameras; produced in the late 1970's, they spawned a patent infringement lawsuit from the Polaroid corporation that resulted in the recall all of instant Kodak models sold and the discontinuation of their production.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Source: <a href="http://www.shutterbug.com/content/it%E2%80%99s-instant%E2%80%94-it%E2%80%99s-not-polaroid-pre-and-post-polaroids-1864-1976">Wade, John. "It's Instant - But It's Not Polaroid: Pre- And-PostPolaroids, From 1864 to 1976." Shutterbug : Published May 1, 2012.</a>

Point and shoot cameras

Series contains mainly inexpensive, fully automatic 35 mm cameras marketed strictly for amateur use. These cameras are the high tech descendants of the box camera and most models have no manual control over focus, aperture, shutter speed, film winding or metering. The viewfinder on point and shoot models is, like the box camera and unlike reflex style cameras, not integrated with the lens; there is no mirror directing the view from the lens to the eye of the photographer. Most of the point and shoot cameras require batteries for operation.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

One-time use cameras

Series contains cameras designed to be disposable. Usually simple, point and shoot cameras made of plastic cases with cardboard housings, these cameras were sold pre-loaded with film and returned to the photofinisher in tact for development. The plastic bodies were often returned to the manufacturer and re-used, with film and housing. Cameras such as this were marketed for travel, weddings, underwater or other situations where a more expensive camera may get damaged. They were available in different film speeds and some models included a flash.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Digital and pre-digital cameras

Series contains cameras that are designed to capture images using sensors and digital storage media instead of film, as well as pre-digital cameras that combined digital technology with film.
The digital camera replaced the traditional film camera in all but a few niche markets very quickly; as of the beginning of the 21st century, all amateur and most professional photogrpahy now takes place in the digital format. These early cameras track the rapid increase of image quality and camera optinos avilable to the consumer.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Toy and promotional cameras

Series contains cameras designed for children or created and distributed as marketing materials for different corporations. These cameras became most popular after the advent of film cartridges, as this greatly simplified the handling and lowered the cost. These cameras are predominantly inexpensive and simply designed, without features that allow the photographer to change aperture or shutter speed.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Motion-picture viewers

Series contains cameras that use film to capture moving images for display. While still image cameras expose one image at a time on photographic film, motion picture cameras take a series of images (or frames) on long strips of film that are then played back using a projector. The speed at which the film is projected matches that which it was taken, a speed (or frame rate) of 24 frames per second was long the standard in the motion picture industry, and is enough to appear to the human eye as motion and not simply a string of still images. Most of the cameras in this series are for amateur or "home movie" use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Eumig C3R 8mm camera

Item is a double 8 cine camera taking 25' spools, optical eye-level finder and spring motor with Reichert Solar f1.9/12.5 mm. This item was produced in the late 1950's and is accompanied by a leather bag, original user's manual and orange lens filter. Written in the small pocket of the bag : Alfred Silverman, 44 Barclay RD, Downsview, Ont. Small knob on the back used to record.

Video cameras

Series contains hand-held, shoulder-mounted, or structurally-attached cameras that use electronic components to record moving images and sound. Most items in this series are for home use. For cameras that record moving images using digital components, see the Digital and Pre-digital cameras series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Weisblatt, Betty

Kodak Lecture Series and Image Arts Lectures

  • 2012.006
  • Collectie
  • 1973-2007

Commencing in 1973, the Kodak Lecture Series Fonds contains audio and video recordings of lectures presenting the work of photographers, filmmakers, photo-based and new media artists, curators and visual media theorists.
A series of lectures at the School of Image Arts (then known as the Photographic Arts Department) was begun by professor Phil Bergerson in 1975 to support the school's unique curriculum. Bergerson wanted to expose his students to new artists and ideas around photography by inviting internationally known artists, curators and theorists to discuss the art of creating, collecting and curating photography. These lectures were financially supported by Ontario Arts Council Grants and ticket sales. The first series (Photographic Perspectives) was extreamly popular, and Bergerson continued to organize the lectures for the next 9 years.
Kodak Canada Inc. stepped in to sponsor the series in 1984, allowing students and the photographic comminity of Toronto to attend all lectures in the series without charge. The series was re-named the Kodak Chair Lecture series (1986-2007), and motion picture and, over time, video and new media artists and theorists joined the line-up of speakers.
Throughout the series, the lectures were documented, on audiocassette and then video tape. In 2009, the lectures began to be streamed online and archived on the RyeCast websites (https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/1/page/Channels.aspx). In 2002, the School of Image Arts received funding from the Canada's Digital Collections (CDC) program, through Industry Canada, to create an online multi-media database of over 200 of the participants, using images and footage captured during the lectures. The project, entitled "Images and Ideas: 25 Years of the Kodak Lecture Series", was completed in 2002 and hosted on the Library and Archives Canada server, along with thousands of other local and national digital projects. The Canada's Digital Collections website is no longer live, but is archived at the Government of Canada website: http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ic/cdc/E/Alphabet.asp
In addition to the Kodak Lectures, the fonds contains the audio recordings of the proceedings of the Canadian Perspectives Conference (1979), a Critique Workshop with Gary Winnogrand (1981), a Critical Writing Workshop with A. D..Coleman (1982), the proceedings of the August Sander Symposium (1982) and the Symposium on Photographic Theory (1983).

Ryerson Image Centre

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