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Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Parks in the sea - California's underwater state parks

This documentary explores the diverse types of aquatic life that live in California’s underwater state parks. The focus of this film is on ecology and aquatic diversity but also mentioned are the relationship between land and sea along California’s coastline, and the types of diving possible in individual parks.

Al Giddings; Images Unlimited Inc.

Bermuda Sub-Dive, Emory Eugene Shark Baiting

Unedited live action footage of six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait in a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The recording also includes other types of deep ocean animal life like crabs, eels and/or fish and an unidentified translucent creature. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, an edited and produced version of this recording.

Glen Warren Productions

[The Beebee Project]

Three sections are featured on this videotape. The first two sections are a documentary of two expeditions that takes place in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Bermuda. The first expedition features Eugenie Clark and Emory Kristof as they dive 1 1/2 miles deep to the ocean floor to study and record the six-gill shark, a relatively recently discovered shark that lives deep in the ocean. With the aid of bait the team and discovers that this part of the ocean floor is not as barren of animal life as once thought, and that the six-gill shark is probably both predator and scavenger to be able to live at these depths. The second expedition features a team of scientists as they dive 3000 feet deep into to mid-waters to record the bizarre and unusual sea life found at these lightless depths. The expeditions are referred to as the Beebee Project, in homage of the important discoveries made by William Beebee and Otis Barton, pioneer underwater explorers. The third section is raw footage of Joe MacInnis doing takes for presentations about undersea explorations and the human condition.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG Atlantic vents

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.
Deep sea sharks Bermuda 4,000' is an edited live action recording of two six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait that is inside a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The unedited version of this version can be seen in: Bermuda sub-dive roll 3; Emory Eugenie shark baiting. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in: Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, a produced version of the recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

The New Explorers: Walking among the sharks

This episode documents a deep sea submersible dive to study the lingcod and the six-gill shark. The lingcod are food fish that live in various diverse depths. The marine researchers aboard the submersibles are studying the causes and effects of the depleting lingcod populations, concentrating study on the baby lingcod population, and comparing lingcod baby numbers found in shallower depths to lingcod babies found in deep depths. As for the six-gill sharks, the goal is simply to learn more about them. The six-gill sharks are a relatively newly discovered type of shark that lives deep in the ocean. The equipment used to conduct the dives are the Deep Rover submersible, the Aquarius 2000 submersible and the Newt Suit deep diving suit. The episode is more focused on the process of underwater exploration rather than the findings that resulted from this.

Kurtis Productions

Deep water dives - Tape 1 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Newt and the Deep Rover submersibles. Trainees include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Robert Furgason, President of Texas University Corpus Christi. Dr. Joe MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 2 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Deep Worker and the Deep Rover submersibles. Dr. Joe MacInnis pilots a submersible in the pool. Other traines include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Wes Turner, biology professor at Texas University Corpus Christi. The recording also contains an interview with Phil Nuytten of Nuytco Research in which he explains ideas behind the design of the Deep Worker submersible. MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 3 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents Dr. Joe MacInnis learning how to pilot the deep sea submersible Deep Rover in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC is the instructor.

Discovery Channel

Great Lakes Seaway Queen - Tape 1 of 2

Captured at Port Dover, on the coast of Lake Eerie, Ontario Canada. This recording is raw footage with director’s comments while directing the shots of the large freighter/container ship the Seaway Queen and surrounding area. Included are shots of the ship docking, interiors and exteriors, the crew loading cargo, possibly grain, landscape and surrounding areas including the town, neighbouring boats including the ship Joshan and crew, and shots of the ship sailing away, heading into dawn.

Undersea Research Ltd.

Great Lakes Seaway Queen - Tape 2 of 2

Captured on Lake Huron, Ontario Canada.This recording is raw footage with director’s comments while directing the shots of the large freighter/container ship the Seaway Queen and surrounding area. Includes shots of the winds and water during a storm.

Undersea Research Ltd.

Edmund Fitzgerald

The items in this series all have to do with the ship the Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in Lake Superior on November 10th, 1975. The recordings concern the 1994 expedition led by Dr. MacInnis and his team’s efforts to find an answer for the demise of the vessel. Included are all stages of the cinematic process from raw footage to feature length films, as well as television and radio interviews about the ship and the process of recording the ship.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Kodak auto-release

Item is an auto-release shutter mechanism for still cameras, which allowed one to take self pictures. By hooking the shoulder of the cable shutter release from the camera into the extended spring clip, an additional 10 second period was available to take the picture after pushing up the release lever. Instructions are attached.

Eastman Kodak Company

Film holders

Item is a set of 2 plate holders - one wood and one metal one FOTAC, the other Fidelity. Both 3.25 x 4.25.

Wilfrid Laurier University

Packard-Ideal shutter

Item is a mechanical shutter with pneumatic operation, includes bulb and tubing. The Packard-Ideal shutter is used behind the lens in large-format view cameras.

Packard Shutter Company

Kodak ektagraphic ir remote control

Item is an Infrared remote control (two pieces, transmiter and receiver) for Ektagraphic slide projectors. These units operates the advance/reverse focus functions function of the projector. Wireless receiver is connected to projector via the wired remote jack. The item comes with original box.

Eastman Kodak Company

Polaroid film holder 545

These allow Polaroid Films to be used with professional 4X5 cameras of various manufacturers these holders would fit standard 4X% camera backs. They were often used for test shots

Philips Magicubes

Item consists of a 12 pack of Philips Magicubes. They introduced in 1970 as an improvement on flashcubes. As oppsed to being fired electrically by batteries, they were fired mechanically by a small bar striking a pin coated in fulminating material. This advancement made cheap flash cameras possible. They were used in cameras such as the Kodak Instamatic and the Agfa Autostar X-126, among others.

Image Arts

Kodak B-C Flasholder

Item consists of a Kodak B-C Flasholder. It features a 22.5-volt battery-condenser system for dependable flash synchronization and can be used with most flash-synchronized cameras, such as the Brownie Six-20 models.

Image Arts

Kodak Handy Reflectors

Item consists of One Pair Kodak Handy Reflectors ...And One Handy Measure for Picture Making at Night. Included in a yellow and green paper envelope with black text are 2 foldable reflecting cones, 2 metal rings, and ABC intruction cards.

Image Arts

Marktime

Item is a clockwork timer that will switch an enlarger On and Off to a preset timefor exposure. A time scale allows settings form 0 to 60 seconds. One can lock a time to repeat it, if neccesary. Includes instruction manual

Eastman Studio Scale

Item consists of an Eastman Studio Scale. It has a wooden base, a 6 piece weight set and a plaque that reads Avoirdupois Weight. It was used to facilitate the mixing of chemicals in a photographer's dark room.

Image Arts

Kodak Reflection-Transmission Color Densitometer Model RT

Item consists of a Kodak Reflection-Transmission Color Densitometer Model RT. When using the transmission mode, the densitometer can be used to measure the density of a negative, and when using the reflection mode, it can measure the saturation of a resulting print. This allows for a photographer to choose the correct paper and exposure to make prints with, without the need to experiment with test strips.

Image Arts

2 Darkroom lights

Item consists of two darkroom lights. Each has a wooden base holding a metal cylinder that surrounds a darkroom bulb. The power cord is thread through the wooden base to connect to the bulb. Only one still has a bulb. The inside of both metal cylinders has been painted white.

Image Arts

Kodak Developing and Printing Outfit No. 2

Item consists of a cardboard box containing materials necessary to develop film and print black and white photographs at home. Items include a Kodak candle lamp darkroom light, glass chemical stirrer, glass measuring cup, darkroom thermometer, 3 black enameled printing trays, black enameled adjustable printing frame for 95 x 150 mm (3.75" x 6"), 95 x 95mm (3.75" x 3.75"), and 65 x 95 mm (2.5" x 3.75") prints. The set includes the original yellow Kodak box, and an insturction booklet for the use of the set.

Kodak wooden developing tank

Item consists of a wooden box used for black and white film developing, containing a stainless steel round metal film tank and reel for 120mm film, 2 handles for film winding that fit through holes in the box, 1 film spool, and a metal instrument. A metal spool holder is mounted to the inside of the box. To use the developing tank, the film backing paper is attached to a spindle in the wooden developing tank, along with a light-tight cover, all of which are wound onto the spindle. The spindle is then transferred to the metal developing tank to be processed.

Source: Early Photography (2019). Roll-film developing tanks. Retrieved from: http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk/site/entry_D70-X.html

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