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MacInnis AudioVisual Collection North and Central America Video With digital objects
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Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Bermuda Sub-Dive, Emory Eugene Shark Baiting

Unedited live action footage of six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait in a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The recording also includes other types of deep ocean animal life like crabs, eels and/or fish and an unidentified translucent creature. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, an edited and produced version of this recording.

Glen Warren Productions

TAG Atlantic vents

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.
Deep sea sharks Bermuda 4,000' is an edited live action recording of two six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait that is inside a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The unedited version of this version can be seen in: Bermuda sub-dive roll 3; Emory Eugenie shark baiting. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in: Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, a produced version of the recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 1 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Newt and the Deep Rover submersibles. Trainees include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Robert Furgason, President of Texas University Corpus Christi. Dr. Joe MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 2 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Deep Worker and the Deep Rover submersibles. Dr. Joe MacInnis pilots a submersible in the pool. Other traines include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Wes Turner, biology professor at Texas University Corpus Christi. The recording also contains an interview with Phil Nuytten of Nuytco Research in which he explains ideas behind the design of the Deep Worker submersible. MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.