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Canada Photography--History
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Canadian Perspectives exhibition and photographer slides

File contains about 600 colour slides taken during the exhibition held in the Image Arts building during the Canadian Perspectives Conference on Canadian photography, as well as images of artwork by Canadian photographers presenting and discussed during the conference. Artists include: Marion P. Bancroft, Marguerite Bell, Robert Bourdeau, Randy Bradley, Jim Breukelman, David Bruce, Lynn Cohen, Share Corsaut, William Cupit, Charles Gagnon, Tom GIbson, Peter Gross, Thaddeus Hollowina, Stephen Homer, Tom Knott, Clayton Lewis, David MacMIllan, L. McClair, Dale Pickering, Tim Porter, Tom Robertson, Michael Semak, Ken Straiton, John Wertscheck, Gabor Szilasi, Ronnie Tessler, Robert Title, and Jim Tomlinson.

Image Arts

Mousetrap camera [replica]

Item is a small, wooden camera obscura with a single meniskus lens to demonstrate function of matt glass focusing screen and focal length. It is a replica built in the style of the small "mousetrap" cameras designed by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid 1830's. They were simple wooden boxes with a single lens used to expose paper negatives, sensitized by silver nitrate (the calotype or Talbotype process). Exposures often took hours, and Talbot had several of the cameras made by a local joiner near his country home in Laycock, Wiltshire.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Wooden camera obscura [replica]

Cameras of this kind were used during the 18th and 19th century by artists and travelling tourists to sketch landscapes and buildings. A piece of transparent paper was placed on the matte screen. One could now trace the outlines of the subject as a guide for later elaborate sketching or painting. It was the predecessor of photographic cameras which, after 1839, could record the image by the reaction of chemical substances to light. Later the simple meniscus lenses were replaced by more corrected lens elements.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

"Five-a-Minute and a Million!"

Item is an article about the Phototeria, written by Frederick Griffin and published in the Toronto Star Weekly on April 14th, 1928.

Griffin, Frederick

View-Master

Item is a handheld view master manufactured by Swayer's Inc and first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). Item is made of plastic and metal. Reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of famous landmarks in British Columbia, Canada. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Reels are interchangeable and come with a variety of themes.

Revolving stereoscope viewer (A. Mattey)

Item is a wooden tabletop stereoscope with binocular viewer made with 50 built in glass stereographs of landscapes from Quebec and Montreal, factories and vernacular photography. Top of the stereoscope can open for additional light. Inside the object is a revolving metal belt (patented by Alexander Beckers) holding the stereographs that can be turned by the circular handles on the outside of the viewer.

Written on object: 76/Unis-France Stereoscopes Mattey-Paris/3.