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Kodak "Petite" camera

Item is a compact folding camera with green and blue bellows. The Kodak Petite was a smaller, roll film camera specifically designed for and marketed to women. They came in several colours, and were also sold in gift sets that included a mirror and compact. Printed on the bottom of the two-part cardboard box is "Made in U.S.A. by Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., Trade Marks Reg. U.S. Pat. Office, Green."

Kodak Premo No. 9 combination case

Item consists of a black leather case with red velvet lining containing a Premo No. 9 Kodak folding camera, two wooden negative holders, and the camera manual. The camera used 5 x 5 or 5 x 7 plates or film packs.

Stereograph Album

1 photo album, with a burgundy and gold cover. Images focus on telling short stories, specific locations and people. Comes with a couple brochures for a stereoscopic exhibit by James Ricalton that focuses on the world.

Double-Sided Stereographs

File contains stereographs with images on both sides of the card. Images depict various animals, people, and buildings from across the world; by unknown publishers

Stereographs, Niagara Region (US and Canada)

File consists of stereographs depicting scenes, famous locations, and structures from the Niagara Region (both American and Canadian sides), such as the falls, bridges, and gardens.

8 Stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
12 Stereoscopic photographs by Griffith & Griffith
12 Stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
9 Stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers, 14 in association with James M. Davis
34 Stereoscopic photographs by C. Bierstadt
85 Stereoscopic photographs by Geo. Barker
5 Stereoscopic photographs by J. H. Ford
3 Stereoscopic photographs by H. C. White Co.
19 Stereoscopic photographs by Geo. E. Curtis
3 Stereoscopic photographs by Whiting View Co.
8 Stereoscopic photographs by International Stereoscopic View Co.
4 Stereoscopic photographs by F. A. Williams
5 Stereoscopic photographs by Samuel Mason
11 Stereoscopic photographs by S. Davis
4 Stereoscopic photographs by Robinson
3 Stereoscopic photographs by Universal View Co.
3 Stereoscopic photographs by London Stereoscopic Co.
2 Stereoscopic photographs by Greater New York Stereo Co.
2 Stereoscopic photographs by O. W. Kimball & Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by J. M. Fernald
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Chandler & Estes
1 Stereoscopic photograph by A. R. Miller
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Frank Rowell
1 Stereoscopic photograph by H. A. Porter
1 Stereoscopic photograph by John P. Soule
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Notman
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Canadian Stereoscopic View Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Pett's
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Bool's
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Dominion Photograph Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Union View Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Northwestern View Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Alfred S. Campbell
1 Stereoscopic photograph by T. W. Ingersoll
1 Stereoscopic photograph by G. W. Woodward
1 Stereoscopic photograph by G. H. Nickerson
1 Stereoscopic photograph by W. H. Illingworth
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Ackermann Bro's
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Webster & Albee
2 Stereoscopic photographs by J. W. Love
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Purviance Photo
1 Stereoscopic photograph by W. McLeish
2 Stereoscopic photographs by R. R. Whiting
96 Stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Univex Mercury (Model CC)

Item is the first Mercury model camera created by the Universal Camera Corp. It takes 18 x 24 mm vertical exposures on Universal No. 200 film, a special 35 mm wide film. The camera has a Wollensak Tricor Anastigmat f3.5/35mm and a rotating focal-plane 1/20-1/1000 shutter.

Kodak Motormatic 35R4

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35R4. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The 35R4 model featured a built-in AG-1 Flashgun.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Retina I type 119

Item consists of a Kodak Retina I. It is a 35mm camera that accepts a daylight-loading cartridge. It is a black model 119. Missing part of lens casing.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Pony IV

Item consists of a Kodak Pony IV. It is a 35mm film camera with a rigidly mounted 44mm f/3.5 Kodak Anastar Lens and a four-speed Kodak Flash 250 Shutter. It originally sold for $40 USD. It is the only Pony model to feature an accessory shoe.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

Item consists of a Kodak 35 camera. It was the first 35mm film Kodak still camera produced in the United States. It was imported to Canada by the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited. It has a Kodak Kodex Shutter with three speeds (1/25 to 1.100 plus T and B), and a Kodak Anastigmat f:5.6, 50mm lens. It has a black body with rounded sides, a lens/shutter unit with two film advance wheels and a collapsible optical viewfinder. It was crafted out of Bakelite with metallic panels and inserts. It failed to do well in the marketplace due to high prices and strong competition, particularly from the Argus C series. It originally sold for $40 USD, the equivalent of approximately $600 today. This f/5.6 version of the Kodak 35 was replaced by one with flash synchronization after the war.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Motormatic 35F

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35F. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The 35F model featured a built-in AG-1 Flash gun.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Pony II

Item consists of a Kodak Pony II camera. It uses 35mm film, has a single speed shutter, and features a Kodak Anastar Lens 44m f/3.9. Rather than traditional f/stops, the lens is marked with exposure values.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Motormatic 35

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The Motormatic 35 has a Bakelite body with metal plates and inserts.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

Item consists of a Kodak 35 camera. It was the first 35mm film Kodak still camera produced in the United States. It has a Kodak Flash Diomatic Shutter with four speeds (1/25 to 1/150 sec, plus B and T), and a Kodak Anastigmat f:4.5, 51mm lens. It has a black body with rounded sides, a lens/shutter unit with two film advance wheels and a collapsible optical viewfinder. It was crafted out of Bakelite with metallic panels and inserts. It failed to do well in the marketplace due to high prices and strong competition, particularly from the Argus C series. It originally sold for $40 USD, the equivalent of approximately $600 today.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Retina IIIC

Item consists of a Kodak Retina IIIC. It is an early version of the last model of folding 35mm film cameras made by Kodak. It is a more rigid redesign of earlier models (the Ia and the IIa). It has a Retina-Xenon f:2.0/50mm Schneider-Kreuznach lens, and a Synchro Compur 1-1/500 MX shutter. It is in a hard brown leather case with green lining that also contains a manual for an All-Mite Flash Unit, a legend for all of the buttons and dials on the Retina IIIC, a lens, a viewfinder, and an undeveloped film canister.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Signet 35

Item consists of a Kodak Signet 35 camera. It has a 45mm f/3.5 Kodak Ektar Lens with rear helicoid focus. The body is sturdy cast aluminum alloy, and it features an automatic film stop counter. It has a Kodak Synchro 300 shutter with 5 speeds and uses 35mm film. It was the first of the Kodak Signet camera line.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

The Kodak 35 was launched by Eastman Kodak Company in 1938 as their first 35 mm camera manufactured in the USA. It was developed and manufactured in Rochester, New York when it became apparent that the company could no longer rely on import from their Kodak AG factory in Germany during the troubled times prior to the Second World War. Originally sold for $40.00 USD.

Eastman Kodak Company

KODAK 35

Item is a 35mm camera with Kodak Anastigmant 50mm f3.5 lens with flash synchrozied shutter

Eastman Kodak Company

Ansco Memo

Item is a leather covered wooden box camera. The Ansco Memo is a single frame, fixed focus which takes landscape oriented images. Film is advanced by pushing down on a lever in the back of the camera. While not the first American camera made for 35mm film, it is the first to sell in abundant quantities.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

Univex Model A8

Item is a die-cast metal cine camera with a black finish. It has an interchangeable f5.6 Ilex Univar lens and a collapsible viewfinder. The camcorder uses Univex 30' patented spools of Single-8 film.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 25

Item is black leather covered metal body video camera with a Newton finder in the handle. The object uses a spring motor at 16 fps and has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm lens with a fixed focus f2.7.

National Graflex Series II

Item is a black single lens reflex camera for 2.25" x 2.5" exposures on 120 rollfilm. Camera uses a B&L Tessar f3.5/75 mm lens and a focal-plane shutter. The series II has cable release, mirror set lever at operator's left of hood and a sliding ruby window cover.

Expo Watch Camera

Item is a small novelty film camera that is disguised as a railroad pocket watch, first produced into early 1900's and sold until 1939. The exposure is made through the winding stem and the winding knob serves as a lens cap, and required special film cartridges. The camera is relatively common, as it was marketed for so long and several variations exist in the "Expo" trademark style, the winding knob, and the viewfinder shape. Black, red, blue enameled versions produced about 1935 are rarer.

Premoette Junior

Item is a black leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The camera has no tracks on the bed but the front standard pulls out and clips into two slots at the front. The front slot is for taking photographs of objects that are 6 to 20 feet away and the back slot is for objects more than 20 feet away. The item uses a ball bearing lens.

Premoette Junior No. 1A

Item is a leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The bellows are black and there is no track on the bed but the front standard fits into two slots at the front, one for objects 6 to 20 feet away and the other for objects that are further than 20 feet away. The camera is still in the original packaging with the accompanying instruction manual. The camera uses a ball bearing lens.

No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak

Item is a metal folding camera with black bellows for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures. Camera uses a Pocket Automatic shutter and has win sprung struts for the lensboard.

No. 1 Readyset Royal

Item is a folding camera with brown bellows and covering, for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures on rollfilm.

No. 1A Pocket Kodak Junior

Item is a brown folding camera with black bellows; for 2.5" x 4.25" exposures on 116 film. The shutter was made by the Eastman Kodak Co. in the United States.

No. 1 Autographic Kodak Junior

Item is a folding camera with black bellows and brown leatherette covering and strap; for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures on No.A - 120 film. The camera was made by the Canadian Kodak Co. but the ball bearing lens was patented by the Eastman Kodak Co. in 1910 and 1913.

No. 2 Folding Brownie

Item is a horizontal folding camera with maroon bellow and a wooden lens standard. Photos were taken on 120 film for 2.25" x 3.25" exposure.

Kodak Six-20 Camera

Item is a folding camera with an enameled art-deco sides. The camera uses 620 film for 2.25" 3.25" exposures. The camera also has a fold down metal strut to support self-erecting front. The lens on the camera is a Kodak Anastigmat f6.3.

No. 2 Folding Pocket Brownie Camera

Item is a horizontal folding camera for 2.25" x 3.25" roll film with an "Autographic" feature. This camera uses metal lensboard instead of wooden.

Portrait of Richard Gordineer

Item is a cream card with photograph of a well dressed black man. On verso, a long text in black letterpress followed by a purple stamp at the bottom reading "C.A. Stacey, Artist./ Over 56 Main Street,/ Medina, New York." The text is a brief biography of Richard Gordineer, a slave born to a Mohawk Dutchman and a black woman, who was freed in 1825 along with all the slaves in New York state. He was an excellent baker, and was regularly employed as a whitewasher until he lost all his savings in 1862. Gordineer died on December 11, 1884.

Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Kodak Brownie Starflex

Item is a pseudo twin lens reflex camera with flashgun attachment. It has a black plastic body with metal faceplate and fittings and was made for use with 127 rollfilm. It has a Dakon lens with a simpler folding finder, as well as an additional sports finder built into the base. Includes a Kodalite Midget Flasholder.

Signet 50 with flash attachment

Item is a viewfinder camera with black bakelite body, metal fittings and large attached flash. It is the fourth model in the Kodak Signet line, featuring a selenium photocell exposure meter. Featuring an Ektanar lens with thorium oxide, the camera is slightly radioactive.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Kodak Disc 8000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap. In plastic display original packaging. Uses HR disc.

Kodak Disc camera (demonstration model)

Item consists of a demonstration verion of the Kodak Disc camera. Disc cameras were compact fixed-focus cameras with built-in flash that used 11x8mm film that came in the form of a flat disc. Camera body is made of clear plastic so the internal mechanics can be seen. Made in U.S.A.

Eastman Kodak Company

The Nussbaum Tray

Item is a clear glass tray for developing photographic prints. A removable glass dowel holds the paper down so it remains inmmersed in the chemical solutions. Sold by the E. & H.T. Anthony company in New York.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Fotolarger enlarger

Item is a photographic enlarger consisting of nine parts; a metal base, two shafts, one bellows/negative holder assembly with red filter, lens assembly, lamp with cord, and three cardbooard negative guides. Cast into the vertical assembly are the words: "Fotolarger, Testrite, N.Y." On the negative holder, there is a metal plate printed with the CSA logo, and "Fotolarger, use #211 lamp 75 W 110-115 V, Testrite Instrument Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. -- made in U.S.A."

Testrite Instrument Co., Inc.

No. 3A Autographic Kodak camera, Model C

Item is a folding camera with black leatherette case and leather bellows. Features a cord with metal push button shutter-release. Fitted with a Kodak Antistigmat lens f7.7 (170mm), No. 11592. Took Autographic film No. A-122. Serial no. 652261.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera. It was manufactured from 1961 to 1967. It is an 8mm camera with a P. Angenieux Paris f.6.5-52mm 1:1.8 Angenieux-Zoom lens with original lens cap. It used a clockwork motor and shot 25 feet rolls of 8mm film at 16 frames per second. Some paint is beginning to peel. When the camera was first released it cost approximately $139.95, about $900 today.

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Kodak Medallion 8

Item consists of a Kodak Medallion 8 movie camera - f/1.9. It ran at 16 fps and used Kodachrome 8mm film.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Kodak Instamatic M9

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M9 movie camera. It is an 8mm camera with an attached folding pistol grip. The body is brown and made of metal and plastic. It has a f/1.8 9.5-45mm Kodak Zoom Lens.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera that uses double 8mm film and has a lens turret featuring a Kodak Normal Ektanar 13mm f/1.9 lens, a Kodak Wide Angle Ektanar 6.5mm f/1.9 lens, and a Kodak Telephoto Ektanar 24mm f/1.9 lens.

Kodak XL330

Item consists of a Kodak XL 330. It is a silent super 8 motion picture camera with a Kodak Ektar f/1.2 9mm lens and fixed focus. It has an adjustable eyepiece, a filming speed of 18 frames per second, a film counter, a battery check button and a tripod socket. It works with 4 AA batteries.

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item is a hand-held motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 8mm film. Includes a 13mm f/2.:3 Kodak Ektanar Lens with aperture selector wheel.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Ciné-Kodak Model K

Item is a 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur use. IT has Camera has an anastigmat 25mm /f1.0 focusing lens with an aperture scale from f1.9 to 16. Camera has an aluminium alloy body and black leather covering. The Model K was an enlarged version of the Model BB to fit either 50- or 100-foot rolls. The camera has a spring driven motor with a winding crank, a tripod socket, exposure guide on the front of the camera, and a footage indicator.

Auto Graflex

Item consists of a single lens reflex Auto Graflex camera for 3.25 x 4.25" plates or film sheets. It has a disappearing Bausch & Lomb 166mm f/4.5 lens, a collapsible viewing hood and a cloth curtain New Simplified Focal Plane Shutter with speeds up to 1/1000 sec. It was made by the Folmer & Schwing Division of the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York from 1907-1923. Two other models of the same camera were made and sold at the same time, one for 4x5" plates and one for 5x7" plates.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Graflex speed graphic

Item was the official US press photographer's camera. It has a focal plane shutter as well as a front shutter. The lens is Wollensaku 135mm F/4.7 Raptar. The camera has a metal drop bed with two focus knobs. On top is a telescoping sports-finder. This model is a 4 x 5 format.

McKoewn pg. 369

Minute 16

Item consists of a 16mm subminiature camera designed to resmble a cine camera. It has a f6.3 meniscus lens and guillotine shutter with a speed of 1/60 seconds. The camera has an aperture scale from f6.3 to 16, a manually reset frame-counter, and a two-piece sports finder. There is also a tripod socket that doubles as flash synch-contact.

Kodak Disc 8000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap. In plastic display original packaging. Uses HR disc.

Falcon Miniature

Item consists of a Falcon Miniature made in New York by Utility Manufacturing Company. It is a 127 film camera with a half frame viewfinder and a black Bakelite body. It has a Wollensak Minivar 50mm lens with fixed aperture and fixed focus, a one speed (1/25 +B) rotary shutter, a simple optical viewfinder and a spare film compartment.

Kodak Disc 3100

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap.

Panoram Kodak No.4

Item is a rollfilm panoramic cameras in which the lens pivots and projects the image to the curved focal plane. The camera uses No. 103 rollfilm to take 3.50 x 12 inch exposures. It has a rapid rectilinear lens and a 142 degree angle. This model is the original model for the Panoram Kodak series and has no door to cover the swinging lens.

Detective camera

Item is a wooden, leather-covered Waterbury Improved Detective Camera. The design is a simple box format with film holders accessed through a door at the rear, and shutter assembly inside the front of box. On the inside of the plate holder door, a sticker reads "Caution, This film must be developed before Jan. 1st, 1900."

Kodak Duaflex III camera

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 620 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder. Camera has a fixed focus Kodet lens.

Ansco Clipper

Item is an Ansco Clipper 4.5 x 6 xm rollfilm camera. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with a black body and expandable lens board.

Kodak Hawkeye Flashfun

Item is a plastic box style camera for use with 127 roll film film. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with beige and brown body and plastic lens. Includes a hot shoe for AG-1 flash bulbs.

Weno Hawk-Eye No. 7

Item is a Weno Hawk-Eye No. 7 box camera by the Blair Camera Division of the Eastman Kodak Company. The wood box is covered with seal grain morocco leather with brass and nickel trimmings. It has a fixed focus achromatic meniscus lens with rotary shutter and set of three stops, two tripod sockets and brilliant finders. The camera uses No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodak film to take 3.25 x 5.50 inch exposures.

No. 3B Quick Focus Kodak

Item is a box camera for 3.25 x 5.50 inch exposures on 125 mm film. It has a meniscus achromatic lens, a rotary shutter with three stops, two tripod sockets, and two brilliant finders. There is a focus lever on the side of the camera to set proper focal distance. After the focus is set, there is a button to press and the camera will open to proper distance focused and ready.

Magazine Cyclone No. 5

Item is a black leather wooden box-style magazine camera for 4x5 inch plates. The camera has a meniscus lens, a time and instantaneous shutter, and two reflecting type viewfinders. This camera model was made by the Western Camera Manufacturing Company prior to 1899 when it became part of the Rochester Optical & Camera Company.

Dollar Box Camera

Item is a small strapless box camera with a single viewfinder that uses 127 film for 4x6.5cm exposures. Some versions are identified "Ansco Dollar Camera" on the front but this specific one only has "Ansco" on the front. This model also came in black, green, and red. The red version with a strap is known as the "Kiddie Camera".

Ray C

Item is a box-type camera for 4x5 inch plates in double plateholders. The wood boy is covered with genuine black leather. It has two viewfinders, a rotating diaphragm with three apertures, a single meniscus lens, and two tripod sockets.

Premo Box Camera

Item consists of a Premo 4x5 inch plate camera with 1 plate holder within. This camera opens a the top for reloading. It has a [stiff] safety shutter, a two speed shutter, two viewfinders, an adjustable diaphragm, and two tripod sockets. The plate holder has the following writing on it "The Premo Camera Patent July 19, 1890 Other patents pending."

Kodak Fiftieth Anniversary Box Brownie

Item consists of a Kodak Fiftieth Anniversary Brownie box camera. It was a commemorative edition Brownie camera that was handed out to children at fairs in the United States during the 1930s. The body of the camera is card covered in brown leatherette, and features a silver seal for the fiftieth anniversary of the Eastman Kodak Company, from 1880 to 1930. It is a simple camera that used 120 medium format film.

Six-16 Brownie

Item consists of a Six-16 Brownie box roll film camera that used size 616 film to make pictures sized 6.35 x 10.8 cm. It has a Diway lens with a close-up lens and a rotary shutter. The body is metal covered in leatherette, with a unique geometric art-deco front panel and two brilliant finders.

Six-20 Brownie Junior

Item consists of Six-20 Brownie Junior box 620 roll film camera. This Brownie camera improves on the Kodak series manufacturing, with a metal body and an Art-Deco front face. It has a rotary shutter and a meniscus lens and two reflecting finders.

Brownie No. 2C Model A

Item consists of a Kodak No. 2-C Brownie Model A box camera. The camera used 130 roll film for an image size of 5.715 x 10.795 cm. It has a standard Meniscus achromatic lens and a rotary shutter.

Kodak Pony 828

Item consists of a Kodak Pony 828 camera. It is a small format camera with a simple viewfinder, Kodak Flash 200 1/8-1/200 shutter, 51 mm f/4.5 Kodak Anaston Lens, and knobs for film advance and rewind. It uses roll film, but 35mm in width.

Kodak Bantam RF

Item consists of a Kodak Bantam Rangefinder Camera. It makes 28x40mm exposures on Kodak's type No. 828 special 35mm paper backed roll film. It has a non-self-cocking Flash 300 shutter, 50mm f/3.9 Kodak Ektanon Lens, an optical viewfinder with a superimposed rangefinder, and is made of brown plastic, aluminum and other metal.

Kodak Medalist I

Item consists of a Kodak Medalist I. It is a 620 film, with a bright finder than attempts to combine the magnified rangefinder and the minified viewfinder. The camera was built during the war and was nicknamed the American Leica, for the design criteria that good pictures could save the lives of soldiers, and the Medalist could take them. It is a medium format, roll film camera with a sharp, multicoated lens, and a rigid aluminum and steel body. The camera has a unique double helical lens tube in place of cloth bellows.

No. 2 Bulls-Eye Kodak

Item consists of an 1899 model of the No. 2 Bulls-Eye Kodak, which was manufactured from 1896-1913. It has a wooden interior, a spring controlled rotary disc shutter, and rotating disc stops controlled by pulling a lever on the top of the camera.

Ansco Shur-Flash

Item is an inexpensive box camera made of fiberboard and covered with imitation leather. The camera has a Gallileo-type viewfinder only (no brilliant viewfinder), flash contacts, and a single speed shutter that is fast enough to accommodate bulb flashes. It used 120 size roll film.

No. 3 Brownie camera, model B

Item is a wooden box camera with leatherette covering for large 8.25 x 10.8 cm (3.25 x 4.25") exposures on 124 film. The design is simple, with a fixed focus and shutter speed. The roll film was advanced past the lens manually with a small crank. The original sales price was $4.00.

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