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Eastman reference manual for salesmen / Eastman Kodak Company

Item is a binder with printed reference material for Kodak salesmen to refer to when discussing Kodak products and equipment with customers. The preface page states: "This manual is provided to help the saleman answer the technical questions asked by his customers. These questions cover a wide field both in the theory and practice of photography. Photographic knowledge has become so vast that it is impossible to carry all the pertinent information in one's mind, so this manual is now provided as a ready reference. It may be used in the presence of the customer." Organized by tabs, the subjects include: 1 - Still Cameras; 2 - Negative Materials; 3 - Color Filters; 4 - Miniature Camera Technique; 5 - Photographic Papers; 6 - Development; 7 - Formulas; 8 - Exposure; 9 - Negative Print Faults; 10 - Cine Kodak; 11 - Color Photography; 12 - Darkroom. Item was designed to be added to over time. Includes correspondence related to the Eastman Photographic Course for Salesmen, as well as two letter from John W. McFarlane, Eastman Kodak editor of the reference manual. Item likely belonged to W.H. Davis, before being passed onto W. Bruce Poldon.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodachrome Type A for Ciné-Kodak

Packages of Cine-Kodak Kodachrome Type A 16mm motion picture film for artificial light. The larger box is unopened, and contains a magazine for loading the film into the camera, as well as 50 ft of film. It is stamped with a use-by date Dec 1946. The smaller box has been opened. It contains 100 ft of film in a small black cannister as well as a folded sheet with instructions. This box is stamped "Simpsons Cameras Toronto" in blue on the back, and with a use-by date of Apr 1943. Both films were manufactured in Rochester, NY but have stickers indicating they are to be returned to Canadian Kodak Co. Limited in Toronto for processing.

Eastman Kodak Company

Gammeter

Item is a transparent sheet printed with an Eastman Kodak Gammeter, a set of indexed graph lines. Gammeters were designed to aid in the dye transfer process by allowing the easy calculation of gammas (colour contrasts) from plotted curves.

Materials related to the Kodak Digital Science DVC 300 digital video camera / Eastman Kodak Company ; PictureWorks Technology, Inc.

File part contains: 1 instructional manual for the Kodak Digital Science DVC 300 digital video camera; 1 envelope containing service warranty information in English and French; 1 CD containing accompanying software; and 1 instructional manual for PictureWorks Live, the mulitmedia application software that accompanied the camera.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Instant camera and film advertisements

File contains prints featuring images of advertisements for Kodak instant cameras, including a diagram of the process fluid, and Kodamatic instant color film. Also included are promotional images of Kodacolor film. Many are filed with captions. The caption for an image advertising Kodamatic Trimprint instant color film reads: "A cold winter's day is an ideal time to organize your pictures into albums. Remember that the Kodamatic Trimprints, when they have been separated from their backing, can be mounted or trimmed like conventional prints."

Kodak Canada Inc.

George Eastman and Thomas Alva Edison

File contains copy prints featuring an image of George Eastman and Thomas Edison. Caption adhered to versos read: "George Eastman, (left) and friend Thomas Alva Edison, early collaborators. Edison purchased one of Eastman's first "snapshot" cameras. The continuous roll of film it held became the basis for Edison's invention of his first motion picture camera."

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak camera patent, 1888

File contains to copy prints of the patent for a camera issued to George Eastman on September 4, 1888. George Eastman invented the first Kodak camera 100 years ago. He was issued US patent number 388,850.

Kodak Canada Inc.

First Kodak camera

Item is a print featuring an image with the caption: The first Kodak camera, introduced in 1888, sold for $25, loaded with enough Eastman film for 100 exposures. It produced a 2 1/2 inch diameter negative.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Rolleiflex 3.5 F

Item is a Rolleiflex 3.5 F, a medium format camera for 6 x 6cm exposures on 120 or 220 format roll film. Includes a Synchro Compur MXV shutter with self timer, built in in exposure meter mounted on the focus knob, and Zeiss Planar 75 mm lens.

Rolleiflex lens hood and filters

Item is a Rolleiflex lens hood with 2 lens filters for photographing in black and white, green (for photographing foliage, sparating greens from other colours0 and yellow (for photographing landscapes, darkens the sky and differentiates different shades of green in foliage).

Rolleinar 1 and 2

Item contains 2 sets of close-up lenses for use with the Rolleiflex 3.5 F. Each set contains 2 lenses, one for the viewing lens and one for the photographing lens on the twin lens reflex camera. A Rolleinar 1 alters the focusing range of the 75mm (normal) lens to 55.8-107 cm and the Rolleinar 2 changes the range to 68-213 cm.

Rolleisoft 0

Item is a soft focus lens attachment designed for use with the Rolleiflex 3.5 F. The lens produces softens lines and details and produces halos around light sources.

Nikkor 24mm 1:2.8 lens

Item is a lens is composed of 9 elements in 7 groups with a picture angle of 84 degrees at infinity. The distance scale is graduated in meters and feet up to 0.3 m and 1 foot. The aperture scale is 2.8 to 22 with a fully automatic aperture diaphragm. The item comes with a Toshiba 52mm sl-1a filter,front and rear caps, and a rubbe lens hood.

Nikkor 135mm 1:3.5 lens

Item is a lens that can be used for a wide range of applications including animal, travel, landscape, portraiture, and even close-up photography. The lens is composed of 4 elements in 3 groups with a picture angle of 18 degrees at infinity. The distance scale is graduated in meters and feet up to 1.5 m and 5 feet. The aperture scale is 3.5 to 22 with a fully automatic aperture diaphragm. The item comes with a Hoya 52mm Skylight (1B) filter and front and rear caps.

Nikkor-S.C auto 1:1.4 f=50mm

Item is a lens, first introduced in 1962, which became the most popular lens manufactured by Nikon with 4 million being produced. The lens is composed of seven elements in five groups with a picture angle of 46 degrees at infinity. The distance scale is graduated in meters and feet up to 0.6 m and 2 feet. The aperture scale is 1.4 to 16 with a fully automatic aperture diaphragm. The item comes with a Toshiba 52mm sl-1a filter and front and rear caps.

Nikon slide copying adapter ps-4

Item is to be used with the Model PB-4 Bellows for duplication of 35mm slides or film strips. The bellows are folded into the adapter unit and is kept in place out of sight with a magnet to protect it from damage. The PS-4 can also be used with the PB-5 bellows.

Early cameras

This series consists of original and duplicate early cameras from the beginning of the history of photography. Based on the basic design of the camera obscura and produced between about 1820 and 1870, these simple devices were usually solid or sliding box cameras with uncomplicated lenses. The shutter was normally outside of the lens, in the form of a lens cap that was simple removed and replaced for exposure, or a rotating metal plate on the front of the lens, which held the aperture. These cameras mainly predated dry plate and flexible film photography, and were used to take Daguerreotype, wet-plate and salted paper photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Box and snapshot roll film cameras

Series contains simple, snapshot cameras designed for mass public consumption, taking advantage of the new flexible roll film that was developed in 1883. The box camera was a logical follow up from the original simple camera obscuras, often having only one shutter speed, simple lenses with minimal f-stop capabilities and manual winds.

The trend arguably began with George Eastman's in 1888 with the first, amateur, handheld camera, "The Kodak", which came pre-loaded with 100 exposures. After exposure, the entire outfit was returned to the Eastman Kodak company, where the film was developed, prints made and sent back to the customer with the camera, now re-loaded with more film.

Many millions of similar cameras were sold, both high and low end, manufactured by different companies and eventually developing into the modern point-and-shoot camera.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Ventura Synchro Box

Item is a mid-century German metal box camera with plastic covering and art-deco front. It was manufactured in 1951 by Agfa Camerawerk. The Synchro term in the name comes from the fact that it has a flash sync shutter. The lens is a 105mm f/11 single-element Meniscus fixed focus lens with a focus range of 3 meters to infinity. A pull-out tab is located above the shutter release to change the aperture. When the tab is fully pushed in, there is a larger aperture approximately equivalent to f/11; the middle tab is a smaller aperture approximately equivalent to f/16; and the last tab is the larger aperture (f/11) with a yellow filter. The shutter is an instant-return self-cocking rotary shutter controlled by a simple spring. The shutter speed can be adjusted by a small sliding lever directly under the side viewfinder. The dot is 1/50th of a second, and the long line is bulb mode. The optics are only slightly better than a toy camera, and have a soft focus but little to no vignetting. Camera takes 6x9cm images on 120mm film. This is the export version made c1951. In 1951 and later, the Agfa name appeared on the front of the camera. It originally sold for $5-10.
Dimensions: 9.7 cm (3.75") x 7.5 cm (3") x 11.5 cm (4.5")

Detective cameras

Items in this series are photographic devices designed to be inconspicuous, intended for photographers to make candid exposures without the subject being aware. The first detective cameras appeared with the production of commercially available dry plates and designs were simple box camera style constructions. These were, in fact, very similar to standard cameras of the time, but were smaller, handheld and able to make exposures relatively quickly. As smaller, flexible film materials became available, these cameras began to be produced disguised as objects such as pocket watches, ties, books, hats, pens and walking sticks.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Scovill & Adams Company

Panoramic cameras

Series contains cameras designed to take wide-angle photographs (images that are least twice as wide as they are tall). Cameras of this nature began to be produced soon after photography was invented, as photographers have always wanted to capture large group portraits, landscape views and skylines. Panoramic photographs are achieved by stitching several exposures together to create one image or with purpose built cameras of several designed, including banquet (similar to standard cameras with wider aspect ratios, designed to take photographs of large groups indoors), short rotation (uses a curved film plane, swinging lens and split shutter that the lens rotates around), and full or long rotation (capable of producing 360 degree views by rotating the camera and film past the shutter).

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Miniature and sub-miniature cameras

This series contains cameras designed to take photographs on flexible film sized smaller than 135 format film (24mm x 36mm). The size of the camera also tended to be very small, and often simply designed. While several companies manufactured high quality miniature cameras (including Minox and Rollei), many others were cheaply made and did not produce relatively poor results.

Film formats for miniature cameras were often priority, created by manufactures for their cameras specifically, and included the following sizes: 10mm x 14xx (16mm film), 13mm x 17mm film (110 film cartridges), 14mm x 14mm (used by "Hit" type cameras), 8mm x 11mm cartridge roll film (Minox), 11mm x 8mm disc film (Kodak).

Miniature cameras gained a reputation as "spy" cameras, and while some of the higher quality ones (including the Minox) were used by government agencies, most were simply for surreptitious, amateur use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Minolta 16EE II

Item is a subminiature camera with wrist strap. The Lens is a Rokkor F2.8/25mm, shutter speeds H (high) and L (low). Auto exposure, coupled shutter metering.

McKoewn Pg. 682

Professional and press cameras

Series contains cameras designed to fulfill specific, professional functions such as surveying, aerial photography, studio portraits and press work. These cameras are often the best items in the manufacturers line, offering more features and a sturdier construction than their amateur counterparts.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Stereoscopic and multi lens cameras

Series contains cameras that have with more than one lens, to create multiple images on the same light sensitive film or plate. These cameras were designed for several purposes, the most popular being the stereoscopic, or three-dimensional, image. Most stereo cameras work by taking two simultaneous images from slightly varying points of view that correspond to the distance between the human eyes. The images are then mounted side-by-side and viewed through a stereoscope (a system of two lenses that helps to converge the two photographs, to mimic the depth perception of binocular vision). Other three-dimensional cameras used four or more lenses to create images for lenticular prints.
Some multi-lens cameras were intended to create multiple copies of the same scene at one time, such as the gem tintype camera and passport camera, while others had shutters that took sequential shots to create images which show the passage of time on one frame.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Single lens reflex cameras

Series contains single lens reflex, or simply reflex, cameras. This deign used a mirror at a 45 degree angle to allow the photographer to look through the lens when composing the photograph, therefore seeing exactly what will appear on the film. Brilliant and sports style viewfinders only alllowed an approximation of the image alignment.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Asahi Pentax 6 x 7

Item is a professional medium format single lens reflex camera for 6 x 7 cm images on 120 or 220 roll film. This camera has a design similar to a 35mm camera with interchangeable Takumar lenses and range finders. It has a Penta Prism viewfinder, a wooden handle and a Takumar 6 x 7 1 :3.5 55 mm wide angle lens.

Twin lens reflex cameras

Series contains cameras designed with two identical lenses, mounted one above the other, for composition and the other for exposure. The twin-lens design allows the photographer a continuous view of the subject while photographing, as the 45 degree angled mirror is mounted to the viewing lens only and therefore does not have to list out of the way during exposure, as in single lens reflex designs. Most designs used a waist level viewfinder with a ground glass.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

In-camera processing (instant) cameras

Series consists of cameras that combine exposure and development in one step to create photographs instantaneously.
While Polaroid is by far the most well known of these cameras, the first patent for instant photography was for the Dubroni, a French wet plate camera, designed so that the glass plate could be sensitized and developed by pouring the chemicals over the plate through a tube in the camera. Later cameras were developed so small tintypes (1895) and direct paper positives (1913) could be made quickly for tourists on busy streets.
But it was the Polaroid Corporation that made instant photography a household item, beginning in 1937 when Edwin Land's young daughter's desire to see her photograph immediately, inspired him to develop the Polaroid's first instant camera: the Land Camera.

The Heritage Collection also contains Kodak Instant Cameras; produced in the late 1970's, they spawned a patent infringement lawsuit from the Polaroid corporation that resulted in the recall all of instant Kodak models sold and the discontinuation of their production.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Source: <a href="http://www.shutterbug.com/content/it%E2%80%99s-instant%E2%80%94-it%E2%80%99s-not-polaroid-pre-and-post-polaroids-1864-1976">Wade, John. "It's Instant - But It's Not Polaroid: Pre- And-PostPolaroids, From 1864 to 1976." Shutterbug : Published May 1, 2012.</a>

Polaroid automatic 250 Land camera

Item is a folding, rangefinder snapshot camera for instant photographs using Polaroid proprietary 100-series Packfilm. Includes leather strap, instruction manual and other brochures, cold clip, and soft plastic cover. This camera Is still loaded with film.

Polaroid Corporation

Polaroid 1200si

The 1200si auto focus polaroid camera for instant photos. Silver body with black hand strap. Flash and tripod mount. Uses Spectra, 990, and 1200 film packs.

Polaroid Corporation

Polaroid portrait Land camera big shot

Item is a large grey plastic rangefinder camera with elongated body between viewfinder and lens. Pictograms indicated adjustments for light or dark conditions. Instructions printed onto a metal plate on the back for loading Type 108 colour film and magicubes (for flash - not present). No batteries necessary for operation.

Polaroid Corporation

Polaroid SX-70 Land camera

Item is a folding, single-lens reflex camera for instant photographs using proprietary Polaroid SX-70 film. Model is a collapsable, leatherette-covered with a matching brown suede carrying case.

Polaroid 360

Item is a folding rangefinder snapshot camera for instant photographs using Polaroid proprietary SX-70 film. Designed for use with a separate flash unit.

Polaroid Colorpack 80

Item is manual focus camera for use with Polaroid proprietary Colorpack film. Uses flash cubes.

Polaroid Corporation

Polaroid Land Camera, model 95a

Item is a variant of the Polaroid Land Camera model 95, and features a 3 element, 135mm f/11 lens, a 4 speed rotary-leaf shutter system with speeds 1/8 to 1/60 seconds. Used black & white 40 series 100 ISO instant roll film with a sepia tone.

Polaroid Corporation

Kodak Pleaser

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant camera with a 100mm f/12.7 lens, a shutter with speeds of 1/15-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type PR 10 (PR144) for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 outfit case

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 with hard leather case, Polaroid flash model 281, 3 developing vials, leather strap, manual, and 7 loose papers. It used 40 series Polaroid Picture Roll Land film.

Polaroid Corporation

Polaroid Land Model 104 outfit case

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 104 outfit case. It is in a black hard leather case lined with red curduroy also containing the Polaroid flash model 268, 2 packs of Polaroid print mounts and 3 Polaroid envelopes for ordering prints, enlargements, and accessories. The camera is a folding bellows instand camera with automatic exposure that used 100-series Packfilm. It has a 2 element plastic lens and a non-folding zone focusing system. It retailed for $60 when it was first released.

Polaroid Corporation

Pleaser II Kodamatic

Item is a Kodak Pleaser. It is an instant 'handle' camera with a 100mm f/12.8 lens, a shutter with speeds of 2-1/300s, and electronic exposure. It used film type HS144 for a picture size of 67 x 91mm. Picture ejection is by the crank on the right hand of the camera. The concept behind this unique-looking camera was to make instant photography as inexpensive and accessible as possible so that consumers might switch from Polaroid to Kodak. It is the second of the Pleaser models and has a two-tone brown plastic body.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Highlander, model 80A

Item is a Polaroid Highlander Land Camera, model 80A. It is a folding instant camera with a 100mm f8.8 3-element glass lens a 2-speed rotary leaf shutter design with speeds of 1/23s and 1/100s, a Polaroid hot shoe flash, rigid viewfinder, painted steel body, chrome plated trim, exposure set by Polaroid Light Value scale, and a rotating lens front-element for distance focus. It is in a leather case also containing the manual.

Polaroid Corporation

Kodak Colorburst 250

Item is a Kodak Colorburst 250. It is an instant camera with a f/1:12.8 100mm lens, electronic flash, and a 2-1/300 secound shutter with motorized picture output. It used Kodak PR-10 instant film. It was first sold in July 1979.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Polaroid Swinger Model 20

Item is a white plastic box cameras for instant photographs on Polaroid type 20 film. The inexpensive model includes a telesopic viewfinder, AG-1 flash-bulb socket and flash range scale with red knob.

Polaroid Corporation

Super Colorpack

Item is a Polaroid Land Camera Super Colorpack instant film camera. Similar to the Polaroid Super Shooter, the Super Colorpack has a rigid plastic body and a manual finder on the lens and uses peel-apart Land Pack Films.

Polaroid Automatic Land Camera 420

Item is one of 1.3 million Polaroid Land cameras manufactured between 1971 and 1977 in the United States. The 420 camera is the successor to Polaroid's 320 model. It features folding bellows, automatic exposure and an external light meter beside the lens, marketed as the "Electric Eye". The Polaroid Automatic Land Camera 420 was designed for 7.2 × 9.5 cm prints on Polaroid 100-series packfilm. The camera features a two-window split system for framing the photograph, whereby the user must first focus using the small rangefinder on the top left of the camera marked "FOCUS", and then frame the photograph using the non-parallax corrected finder with marked frame-lines marked "VIEW". Control over the exposure could be achieved by adjusting the exposure value +2 to -1.5 stops below the plastic 114mm f/8.8 2-element lens. A PC input is included for optional flash. The camera automatically selects both shutter speed and aperture, which range from 1/1200sec to 10sec for shutter speed; and f8 to f42 for aperture. The Polaroid 420 model originally sold for around $60. Included with the item in the collection is the Polaroid Focused Flash and Polaroid Self-Timer.

Point and shoot cameras

Series contains mainly inexpensive, fully automatic 35 mm cameras marketed strictly for amateur use. These cameras are the high tech descendants of the box camera and most models have no manual control over focus, aperture, shutter speed, film winding or metering. The viewfinder on point and shoot models is, like the box camera and unlike reflex style cameras, not integrated with the lens; there is no mirror directing the view from the lens to the eye of the photographer. Most of the point and shoot cameras require batteries for operation.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Ricoh XF-30

Item is an automatic, battery operated, 35mm camera with Rikenon 1:4, F35 lens and pop-up flash.

Pentax Espio 115M

Item is a Pentax Espio 115M with remote control and operating manual. It is a 35mm compact zoom camera with autofocus. Grey in colour. Fully automatic lens-shutter with auto flash. Pentax electronic power zoom 35-115mm f/3.9-10.5 lens. Standard/panorama viewfinder, real image with lines for parallax correction, diopter adjustment. Focus lock and flash readiness indicators. Built-in flash with red-eye reduction. Self-timer. Auto-loading, winding and rewinding.

Asahi Optical Co., Ltd.

Kodak Advantix T550

Item consists of a Kodak Advantix T550. It is an advanced photo system camera that is fully automatic, with self timer and date printing settings. It has an Ektanar All Glass Lens f3.5/28mm lens and a flip-up lens cover that also reveals the flash It is silver in colour.

Eastman Kodak Company

Fuji DL-95 Super

Item is a Fuji DL-95 Super. DL for drop-in loading. 35mm film, autofocus, red-eye reduction, panorama mode options.

Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.

Olympus-Pen EE-2

Item is a 35mm camera with fully automatic regulation of shutter and aperture. Fixed focus F3.5/28mm lens and compact size makes this a nice pocket camera. Has gray textured out body casing.

DL-500 Wide Date

Item is a automatic snapshot camera for photographs on 35 mm film. DL refers to "drop-in loading". Includes a 28mm/45mm standard lens. Has a display function of the date on the photos.

Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.

Kodak Star 105 Zoom-QD

Item consists of a Kodak Star 105 Zoom-QD 35mm camera in original packaging with two rolls of 24 exposure Kodak Royal Gold 400 ISO film, batteries and camera pouch. It has an Ektanar Zoom Lens 38-105mm. It is fully automatic and has a maximum aperture of f/3.5 at the wide-angle setting.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Pentax Espio 140

Item is a Pentax Espio 140. This is a 35mm compact camera with autofocus and zoom lens. Has a SMC Pentax Zoom Lens 38mm-140mm. Self-timer, CR-123 battery, Multi AF autofucus. Integrated flash. Panoramic mode.

Asahi Optical Co., Ltd.

Kodak Advantix 5800 MRX

Item consists of a Kodak Advantix 5800 MRX. It is an advanced photo system camera that is fully automatic, with self timer and date printing settings. It has a Kodak Aspheric Glass 26-130 Zoom lens.

Eastman Kodak Company

Olympus Stylus Zoom 115 DX

Item is a fully automatic 35mm compact camera with 38-115 mm zoom lens and panoramic capabilities. The camera is turned on by sliding the lens cover to one side. An LCD display shows date and time, exposure count, and functions. The shutter release is pressed halfway down to lock focus. The body of the camera is silver plastic and features a small built-in flash. The camera was recommended for use with 400 ISO film.

Olympus Optical Company Limited

Nikon Nuvis 125i

Item consists of a Nikon Nuvis 125i IX240 APS compact automatic camera with a magnetic information exchange system and 30-100mm power zoom f/4.3-9.2 lens. It has a built-in flash with red-eye reduction.

Kodak Star Motordrive

Item is an automatic, fixed-focus snapshot camera for photographs on 35 mm film. This model features red-eye reduction and built in flash.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Cameo Motor Ex camera outfit

Item consists of a Kodak Cameo Motor Ex camera outfit, including camera, 2 AAA batteries, instruction manual and a roll of 12 exposure Kodak Gold 400 ISO 35 mm film for colour prints. Develop before date of film is January 2001. The camera itself has a slim black body with rounded edges and a flip-up automatic flash that covers the viewfinder when closed. Other features include automatic film advance, self-timer and film speed selection.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic X

Item is a small hand held camera with a dark green plastic body and metal fittings (the green is mottled to look like leatherette). Made for use with 126 cartridge film, the camera is fitted with a tripod socket and features a fixed focus lens and two speed shutter. Flash facility is available for use of Magicubes.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Canon Sure Shot 70mm Zoom

Item consists of a Canon, 35 mm, fully automatic point and shoot camera with built in flash and sliding lens cover. The F 4.2 - 7.8, 70mm zoom lens retracts when camera is closed.

One-time use cameras

Series contains cameras designed to be disposable. Usually simple, point and shoot cameras made of plastic cases with cardboard housings, these cameras were sold pre-loaded with film and returned to the photofinisher in tact for development. The plastic bodies were often returned to the manufacturer and re-used, with film and housing. Cameras such as this were marketed for travel, weddings, underwater or other situations where a more expensive camera may get damaged. They were available in different film speeds and some models included a flash.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Kodak FunSaver

Item consists of a Kodak FunSaver Pocket Camera. It is a 35mm one-time use camera, sealed in original packaging. It is a commemorative Olympic edition.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak FunSaver Weekend 35 outdoor only

Item consists of a disposable camera for all weather and underwater use loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Gold 400 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is March 1997.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max HQ with flash

Item consists of a one-time use camera loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is May 2004.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max Outdoor

Item consists of a one-time-use, 35mm, 27 exposure camera with Kodak Max film, for outdoor use. New in box. Develop before date is December 2000.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak Max Sport

Item consists of Kodak Max Sport one-time-use, 35mm, 27 exposure camera with Kodak Max film, for outdoor use. It is waterproof and features a rubberized grip, and an included wristband. New in box. Develop before December 2000.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak Max Waterproof

Item consists of Kodak Max Waterproof one-time-use, 35mm, 27 exposure camera with Kodak Max film, for outdoor use. New in box. Develop before July 2000.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

Kodak FunSaver 35 indoor/outdoor camera with flash

Item consists of a disposable camera for indoor/outdoor use with flash loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Gold 400 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is July 1997.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max waterproof

Item consists of a one-time use waterproof camera for outdoor use loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is June 2000.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak FunSaver 35 indoor/outdoor camera with flash

Item consists of a disposable camera for indoor/outdoor use with flash loaded with a 15 exposure roll of Kodak Gold 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is April 1998.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max sport

Item consists of a one-time use camera loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is July 2002.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max HQ with flash

Item consists of a one-time use camera loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is October 2003.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak FunSaver 35 with flash

Item consists of a disposable camera with flash loaded with a 24 exposure roll of Kodacolor Gold 400 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is April 1994.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max sport

Item consists of a one-time use camera loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is May 2003.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max waterproof

Item consists of a one-time use waterproof camera for outdoor use loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak Max 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is June 2000.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Kodak Max outdoor camera

Item consists of a disposable camera for use in bright light loaded with a 27 exposure roll of Kodak 800 ISO 35mm film for colour prints. Develop before date is February 2004.

Kodak Canada Inc.

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