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photographic equipment
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Eastman Studio Scale

Item consists of an Eastman Studio Scale. It has a wooden base, a 6 piece weight set and a plaque that reads Avoirdupois Weight. It was used to facilitate the mixing of chemicals in a photographer's dark room.

Image Arts

Kodak Reflection-Transmission Color Densitometer Model RT

Item consists of a Kodak Reflection-Transmission Color Densitometer Model RT. When using the transmission mode, the densitometer can be used to measure the density of a negative, and when using the reflection mode, it can measure the saturation of a resulting print. This allows for a photographer to choose the correct paper and exposure to make prints with, without the need to experiment with test strips.

Image Arts

2 Darkroom lights

Item consists of two darkroom lights. Each has a wooden base holding a metal cylinder that surrounds a darkroom bulb. The power cord is thread through the wooden base to connect to the bulb. Only one still has a bulb. The inside of both metal cylinders has been painted white.

Image Arts

Vivitar Instant Slide Printer

A device to instantly get a photo from a slide, using Polaroid film. Built from plastic material, it allows to insert a mounted slide and be seen on a little screen. The exposure may be adjusted

Uses C batteries

Enlarger accessories

Item is a group of accessories to be used with a photographic enlarger. Individual pieces include filter holders, negative holders, andfocusing lenses.

Wilfrid Laurier University

Kodak liquid retouching colors

Item is a set of colour pigments, produced by the Eastman Kodak Company and used to touch up colour prints and transparencies. The set contains 10 pigments; green, cyan, blue, magenta, red, yellow, orange, brown, neutral and reducer.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Professional BW400CN

Package of 5 rolls of 400 ISO, new in box black-and-white 36 exposure 35 mm photographic negative film that was designed to be processed with C41 colour processing and printed on colour photograhpic paper.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Ektachrome 64

Item is a roll casing from 64 ISO 36 exposure 35 mm photographic colour reversal film (film has been removed). E6 process. Ektachrome was used by National Geographic for low light situations where Kodachrome was not sensitive enough. The E6 process film was introduced in 1977.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Kodachrome 64

item is a roll casing from 64 ISO 36 exposure 35 mm photographic colour reversal film (film has been removed). K-14 process. Kodachrome 64 135 was produced form 1974-2009

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Kodachrome 25

Item is a roll casing from 25 ISO 36 exposure 35 mm photographic colour reversal film (film has been removed). K-14 process. Kodachrome 25 135 was produced form 1974-2001

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Kodachrome II 25

Roll casing from 25 ISO 36 exposure 35 mm photographic colour reversal film (film has been removed). K-12 process. Kodachrome II 25 135 was produced form 1961-1974

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodacolor Gold 100

Item is a roll of 100 ISO 24 exposure 35 mm photographic colour negative film. C-41 process. Kodacolor Gold 100 was introduced as Kodacolor VR-G 100 in 1986.

Eastman Kodak Company

Photographic and motion picture film

Item is a collection of 107 varied motion picture and still photographic film.

BOX 1
Vericolor Slide film - 35mm, 100 feet
Ektachrome 64T - 35mm, 100 feet
Kodak Fine Grain Positive Safety film 35mm, 100 feeet
Kodak Super-XX Negative 16mm film, 100 feet
Kodak Ektachrome film 7242 16mm film, 100 feet
Kodak Ektachrome film 7241 EF 16mm film, 100 feet
Eastman Ekatchrome Video News Film High Speed 7250 Tungsten, 16mm 100 feet
Kodak Ektachrome 64 Daylight 120 film, 3 rolls
Kodachrome 40 movie film type A (exposed)
Eastman Ektachrome Super 8 color reversal film
Kodak Ektachrome Super 8 film (exposed)
Kodacolor-X color negative film, 126 cartridge with packaging
Kodak Ektachrome 160 sound color vocie film type A, 15m
Kodacolor II film for color prints, 126 cartridge
Kodacolor-X color negative film process C-22, 126 cartridge
Kodacolor-X color negative film process C-22 for blue bulbs, 126 cartridge
Kodacolor 400 color negative film, 120
2 Kodacolor II color negative film, 120
Kodacolor-X color negative film, 120
Kodak Ektachrome 400 colour reversal film, 120
3 Kodak Professional Ektachrome 50 colour reversal film, 120
Kodak Ekatchrome 400 film, 120
Kodak Plus_X Pan film in package
3 Kodak Verichrome Pan black and white film, 120
Kodacolor 400 color negative film, 35mm
TMAX P3200 black and white film, 35mm
2 Kodak TMAX 100 black and white film, 35mm
2 Kodak Proferssional T400CN C-41 black and white film, 35mm
Kodak Ektachrome 100HC 24 exposure, 35mm
Kodak High Speed Infrared black and white film, 35mm
Kodachrome 64 Professional color reversal film, 35mm
Kodak Professional Vericolor III color negative film 5026 Type S, 35mm
Kodak Professional Ektagraphic HC slide film, 35mm
Kodak Professional Ektachrome 400X color reversal film 36 exposures, 35mm
Kodak Professional Portra 800 colour negative film sample 36 exposure, 35mm
Kodak Ektachrome 400X Daylight 36 exposure, 35mm
Kodak Select Series Royal Gold 100 color negative film 24 exposure, 35mm
Kodak Professional Portra 100T color negative film 36 exposure, 35mm
2 Kodak APS 200 25 exposure, advantix
5 Kodak mailer for color slides prepaid processing for Ektachrome and Kodachrome 135-36
1 Package of 3 Kodak Advantix 400 iso film
1 Kodak Advantix demonstration film

BOX 2
Minolta 16 100, 126 cartridge
Ricoh Golden film 100, 126 cartridge
Velox developing paper, 3 1/4"x5 1/4"
Agfapan 100 Professional Minox 100 36 exposure, 8x11mm (for subminiature camera)
Minox 3x3cm slide frames (17 frames & 2 slides)
Konica SR-G disc film 15 exposures
Exposed disc film 15 exposures
Kodak Verichrome Pan film, 616 (out of package)
Kodak TRI-X Pan Professional black-and-white film, 120 (out of package)
Kodak Royal-X black-and-white film, 120 (out of package)
Kodak Verichrome Pan colour film, 116 (out of package)
Kodak Ektachrome Daylight high speed colour film, 120 (out of package)
Kodak Verichrome colour film, 120 (exposed, out of package)
Kodacolor 400 colour film, 120 (out of package)
Kodak Ektachrome 64 Professional reversal film, 120 (out of package)
Kodak Vericolor II Professional color fim, 120 (out of package)
Kodachrome II film, 828 (out of package)
Ansochrome ASA 32 colour film, instamatic (out of package)
Kodak ASA 100 colour film, instamatic (out of package)
Kodacolor VRG 200 color film, 110 (out of package)
Konica color slide film 100 24 exposure, 35mm (out of package)
Fujicolor Superia 200 color film (out of package)
Panchro film exposed, 127 (out of package)
2 Rollei film cassettes, 16 (out of package)
2 Kiev-30 film cassettes
3 Kalt 35mm bulk film canisters
2 plastic 35 mm bulk film canisters
Star-D Photo Accessories, 9 135 bulk film canisters
Steky fine grain panchromatic black-and-white film, 16mm
2 Fujichrome 64T Professional color transparency film, 120
gaf Colour Movie Film Super 8
Kodak INstant COlor FIlm PR144-10 (package only)
Eastman Ektachrome Super 8 colour reversal film
Kmart Focal Super 8 colour movie film II
Fujicolor F-64D negative film, 16mm
Fujicolor F-125 negaive film, 16mm
Eastman Kodak film canister
Fujichrome 64T Professional, 4x5
Ilford FP4 Plus 125 20 exposure, 35mm
Fujichrome 50 Professional color transparency film 36 exposure, 35mm
Fujicolor DX HR 1600 color film 36 exposure, 35mm
Fujichrome 100 Snsia II color film 36 exposure, 35mm
2 Fujifilm Adcanced Photo system Fujicolor nexia D100 25 exposure, APS
Eastman Kodak Company high speed safety film, 35mm
Easman Film and Plate developer

Kodak Mailer for Color Movies

Item consists of of 2 Kodak mailers for color movies. They are prepaid processing packages that allowed the user to mail in and have processed 1 super 8 - 50 ft. cartridge, or super 8 - 50 ft. sound cartridge Kodachrome or Ektachrome 40, 160 or Type G movie film.

Image Arts

Kodak Complete Outfit of Transparent Oil Colors package

Item consists of a Kodak Complete Outfit of Transparent Oil Colours kit, including oil paints, Instructions for Using Kodak Transparent Oil Colors, and How to Use The Complete Outfit of Kodak Transparent Oil Colors, with a glass palette and application tools in a wooden case. They could be used for coloring contact prints and enlargements.

Image Arts

Cine-Kodak Duo Splicer outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Duo Spicer Outfit complete with film cement, containers, an envelope of mounting screws and strips of practice film, and splicer. Missing applicators. For 8mm and 16mm movies, buth sound and silent.

Image Arts

Kodascope Junior Film Splicing Outfit

Item consists of a Kodascope Junior Film Splicing Outfit for 8mm and 16mm film. Included are directions for splicing film, a brush, an applicator, a can of film cement, a jar of film cement, an empty jar, screws and splicer in a black and silver box.

Image Arts

Kodaslide Projector Model 1A

Item consists of a Kodaslide Projector Model 1A. The item is an improved model of the Kodaslide Projector (produced 1937-1940), the first Kodak slide projector to project 50 x 50 mm glass-mounted transparency slides. Along with improvements made by the Kodaslide Projector Model 1 (produced 1939 to 1947), the first model to accept Kodachrome transparencies in Kodaslide Ready-Mount, the Kodaslide Projector Model 1A provided a sharper, brighter projection and featured a 150-watt lamp, a 4-inch Kodak Projection Ektanon f3.5 Luminized Lens, and single-element heat-absorbing glass as an added measure to help protect the transparency slides during projection.

Image Arts

Kodak 500 Projector

Item consists of a Kodak 500 Projector. It was the considered the most portable Kodak projector yet, weighing just over 4 kilograms and featuring a self-contained carrying case. This item has a Kodak Readymatic Changer system that could hold up to 36 slides, but the Kodak 500 Projector was also made with a metal automatic magazine changer that stored up to 30 slides, allowing purchasers to choose their preferred slide-handling system.

Image Arts

Kodascope Eight Model 70

Item consists of a Kodascope Eight Model 70 8mm motion picture film projector. On the reverse, the projector has a dial for slower to faster projection, and a switch with options Off, Motor and Lamp. It has a grey metal body, and is for use with slow burning film only. On the front of the projector is a threading knob. It has a 1 inch f/1.6 lens.

Image Arts

Griswold Film Splicer Model R-3

Item consists of a Griswold Film Splicer Model R-3 from Jefferson, New York. The serial number is 7065. It was made by Neumade Products Corp., New York, N.Y. Factory, Buffalo N.Y. The body is made of cast iron. For 35mm film.

Image Arts

Kodak Brownie Movie Projector Model I

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Movie Projector, the first model. The projector was manufactured from October 1952 to February 1955. It is for 8mm film, has an f/2 lens, and a max reel of 200 ft. It originally marketed for $62.50. It has a brown metal and plastic body with a removable protective cover that has an operation manual laminated inside.

Image Arts

Kodaslide Merit Projector

Item consists of a Kodaslide Merit Projector. It has a 5 inch f/3.5 Kodak Projection Ektanon Lens and uses a 150-watt, 120-volt lamp. It has been made to accept all standard 2 x 2-inch slides. As opposed to other projector models of the time that featured automatic changers that could hold multiple slides at a time, the Kodaslide Merit Projector used an earlier slide-feeding method of inserting each slide individually into the top of the unit.

Image Arts

Argus film splicer

Small grey metal splicer for cutting and rejoining 8 mm film strips for at-home editing. Remnants of film strips were found in the splicer along with a crumpled piece of paper with instructions for use.

Argus Cameras of Canada Ltd.

Heritage Camera Collection

  • 2005.006
  • Collection
  • [between ca. 1860 and 2010]

The Heritage Camera Collection is comprised of cameras, mainly from the Wilhem E. Nassau Camera Collection, the Irving G. Rumney fonds, and several other small, individual donations.

This collection traces the evolution of the tools of popular photography from the turn of the nineteenth century to the current digital age. Many of the cameras were manufactured by Kodak Canada or Eastman Kodak, but there are also examples from many other manufacturers, such as: Ernst Leitz, Minox, Polaroid, Nikon, Rollei, Mamiya, Olympus, Contax, and several companies that pre-date, and were eventually amalgamated into Kodak, including the Rochester Optical Company.

Items in the collection are arranged in series according on their form and function; the categories are based on the research and publications of Michel Auer and Todd Gustavson, and often overlap chronologically.

Series are as follows:

Early cameras
Dry plate cameras
Field cameras
Folding (bellows) cameras
Box and snapsot roll film cameras
Detective cameras
Panoramic cameras
Miniature and sub-miniature cameras
Single lens reflex cameras
Twin lens reflex cameras
35mm cameras
In-camera processing (instant) cameras
Point and shoot caemras
One-time-use cameras
Digital and pre-digital cameras
Toy and promotional cameras
Motion-picture cameras
Video cameras

To browse the series, click on the "View the list" link under the "See the sous-fonds, series or sub-series lists for this collection" title (to the right of the page).

Early cameras

This series consists of original and duplicate early cameras from the beginning of the history of photography. Based on the basic design of the camera obscura and produced between about 1820 and 1870, these simple devices were usually solid or sliding box cameras with uncomplicated lenses. The shutter was normally outside of the lens, in the form of a lens cap that was simple removed and replaced for exposure, or a rotating metal plate on the front of the lens, which held the aperture. These cameras mainly predated dry plate and flexible film photography, and were used to take Daguerreotype, wet-plate and salted paper photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Mousetrap camera [replica]

Item is a small, wooden camera obscura with a single meniskus lens to demonstrate function of matt glass focusing screen and focal length. It is a replica built in the style of the small "mousetrap" cameras designed by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid 1830's. They were simple wooden boxes with a single lens used to expose paper negatives, sensitized by silver nitrate (the calotype or Talbotype process). Exposures often took hours, and Talbot had several of the cameras made by a local joiner near his country home in Laycock, Wiltshire.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Wooden camera obscura [replica]

Cameras of this kind were used during the 18th and 19th century by artists and travelling tourists to sketch landscapes and buildings. A piece of transparent paper was placed on the matte screen. One could now trace the outlines of the subject as a guide for later elaborate sketching or painting. It was the predecessor of photographic cameras which, after 1839, could record the image by the reaction of chemical substances to light. Later the simple meniscus lenses were replaced by more corrected lens elements.

Nassau, Wilhelm E.

Jules Carpentier Photo-Jumelle

Item consists of a Jules Carpentier Photo-Jumelle, a rigid-bodied binocular camera. One lens is for viewing and the other is for taking single exposures. This jumelle-type camera is not a stereo camera. The magazine holds 12 plates that are 4.5 x 6 cm or 6.5 x 9 cm in size. There is also a rare stereo version of this camera.

Dry plate cameras

This series contains cameras designed for use with commercially manufactured dry plate negatives. Produced between about 1880 and 1900, these cameras began to be marketed to amateur photographers due to the relative ease of using dry plates. Exposure times shortened, necessitating faster shutters, within the lens or camera. The equipment also became more compact, allowing for hand-held photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Seneca View Camera

Item is a wooden, tailboard folding field view camera, for use with 13 x 18 cm (5 x 7 inch) dry plates. Field cameras are view cameras that produce studio quality images but are designed to fold down to a more compact, portable size. The camera includes a Universal Rapid Lens, series E and glass plate holder.

Kodak Premo No. 9 combination case

Item consists of a black leather case with red velvet lining containing a Premo No. 9 Kodak folding camera, two wooden negative holders, and the camera manual. The camera used 5 x 5 or 5 x 7 plates or film packs.

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Reversible Back Premo camera

Item is a folding field camera for exposures on 8x10 plates, manufactured by the Rochester Optical and Camera Company. Wood camera with red bellows and brass hardware. Created for advanced amateur and professional photographers, the back was reversible to allow the photographer to photograph in both landscape and portrait orientations and had adjustable tilt to account for distortion. Includes a Ross f8-64 lens.

J. Lizars Challenge camera

Item is a luxury wood and brass, self casing folding plate camera with red bellows. Front plate has full tilt, shift and swivel capabilities. Equipped with a 10 1/4 in F 11 Ross lens. Serial # 90191.

Graflex RB Series D

The Graflex RB is a single-lens reflex camera, the last of the family of field cameras known as "Graflex cameras", in contrast to the "Graphic" Graflex cameras. This model was produced between 1928-1947. It features a rotating back (abbreviated to RB), 4" x 5" plate holder, a light-excluding focusing-hood, interchangeable film holders, extensible lens with hood, and a f/4.5 anastigmat lens with a focal length of 7-1/2 inches (190mm), and is is designed to be held at waist height for use. The Graflex was used in the USA Navy and favoured for its ability to capture outdoor and action scenes. The aperture and tension can be adjusted according to the shutter speed plate, a table mounted on the side of the camera indicating adjustments. The Graflex RB series D is composed of straight-grain Honduras mahogany covered with black Morocco leather and chrome details.

This camera is accompanied by a carrying case of wood, black leather, and green felt. It contains one camera instruction manual: "Instruction manual for Graflex Cameras: RB Super D & RB Series B: Also Earlier Models including Series B, RB Series D, Auto, RB Auto, Auto Jr., RB Tele & RB Jr." It also contains 7 film holders and one replacement rotating back. The back piece is inscribed with: "Graflex Cute film Magazine: Pat Sept 7, 1920 Other Patents Pending: Made in U.S.A. by Folmer Graflex Corporation Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A., 43. For use of this alternate back, the camera back must be removed and rotated.

Folding (bellows) cameras

This series contains cameras designed for roll film and employed a folding design, in which a front flap opened and lens and bellows extended from the camera body. This design balanced the need to produce large sized negatives while making the cameras smaller, and more convenient than the box format cameras. Many were variations on the basic Kodak design that, when folded, resembled a long, flat box with rounded ends. Both brilliant viewfinders and optical direct finders were used in these designs and lenses were generally more advanced than the simple box cameras, with shutter speed and focus adjustments possible.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

No. 3A Autographic Kodak camera, Model C

Item is a folding camera with black leatherette case and leather bellows. Features a cord with metal push button shutter-release. Fitted with a Kodak Antistigmat lens f7.7 (170mm), No. 11592. Took Autographic film No. A-122. Serial no. 652261.

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