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MacInnis AudioVisual Collection

  • 2005.002
  • Fondo
  • [ca. 1934-2004]

The collection consists of audio, video and film recordings made by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during his underwater dives from the 1970s to 2004. The bulk of the collection concerns the shipwrecks of the Titanic, the Breadalbane and the Edmund Fitzgerald. There are also many films that highlight deep sea ecology and oceanography, particularly hydrothermal vents and deep sea sharks. Most recordings in the collection consist of rough or unedited footage. The collection also includes television and radio programs on which Dr. MacInnis appeared and some video and audio recordings by MacInnis' friends and colleagues. There is a small selection of footage collected by MacInnis for research purposes, including footage of William Beebe and Otis Barton's deep sea dives in their revolutionary 'bathysphere' in 1934.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep Sea

Deep sea exploration involves diving at depths greater then humanly possible without a submersible vehicle, or greater than 1000 feet below the surface. In this series are moving images of hydrothermal vents, deep sea sharks, the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Komsomollets, and ocean floor ecology. Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in deep sea settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions. Some of the recordings are in Russian.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Dive to the Edge of Creation

A documentary following a team of biologists and geologists 1 1/2 miles below the ocean surface where they discover worlds of life around thermal vents which are supported by bacteria that convert chemicals into organic matter. This landmark dive confirmed aspects of the theory of plate tectonics and yielded important biological discoveries. The underwater footage was filmed from the Alvin submersible, which traveled aboard the mothership Lulu. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century and are theorized to be the originators of life on earth.

National Geographic Society

Visions of the Deep: the underwater world of Al Giddings

A documentary both about the process of underwater photography and cinematography and the amazing types of aquatic life that have been captured by Al Gidding's, his cameras and his team. The film elaborates on the process and challenges that arise with capturing images underwater while showing us beautiful imagery. Included are segments on diving under the North Pole, swimming with and feeding sharks, deep diving and diving in tropical climates.

Al Giddings; Images Unlimited Inc.

Otis Barton (Beebe/Barton's 1934 Bathysphere) Revisits the Deep Sea 50 Years Later in Harbour Branch Johnson - Sea Link 1 [rough cut]

Recorded in Florida at Harbor Branch Oceanographic and in the Atlantic Ocean. This recording documents Otis Barton, pioneer underwater explorer and designer of the bathysphere (1930), as he revisits the deep sea 50 years later aboard the Johnson Sea Link 1. The recording includes drawings of the creatures that Barton encountered during his plunges during the era of the bathysphere. Following this, the recording goes on to another deep dive aboard the Johnson Sea Link 1 submersible. Included are close up images of the deep sea animal life collected during this dive. It is not mentioned whether or not Barton also took part in this dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Jaws: the true story

Looks at the legendary great white shark, the most awesome and powerful predator in the sea. Discusses some of the unanswered basic biological questions about the shark such as its breeding, eating and migration habits, as well as the number of great white sharks in the oceans. Explores questions surrounding shark attacks unto humans.

Time-Life Video

Sub Int. looking at lannonar sci. equip ; #18

This underwater recording is of scent traps at various depths and the sea life that ate the bait. The traps are recorded at depths of 490 feet, 1000 feet and 2007 feet. The traps contain brine shrimp and fluorescein, a substance that is used to cause fluorescence and therefore visibility. Shrimp and a jellyfish that have eaten the bait can be seen at the deepest depth in this recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Jelly Fish single/multiple ; #19

This recording is of hundreds of jellyfish swimming at an undisclosed depth. The highlight of this recording is a mass of jellyfish that are together for unknown reasons. Those conducting the research theorize that the jellyfish are either caught together, there tentacles intertwined and knotted, or feasting on something.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Recent advances in the deep frontier

Dr. Joe MacInnis, a physician and underwater researcher, discusses the recent advances in underwater research at a Nipissing University lecture. MacInnis begins with the discovery of the shipwrecks: the Titanic and the Atocha, and follows with the main part of the lecture, the discovery accomplished by his own team of Breadalbane shipwreck. Included are: a brief history of the ship, the efforts that went into the discovery, the difficulties of Arctic exploration as well as the benefits of cold water related to the state of preservation of the ship, and scientific discoveries that result from this type of expedition. The later part of the lecture explores new aspects of undersea research and future expeditions planned for Bermuda and the Canadian Great Lakes.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Parks in the sea - California's underwater state parks

This documentary explores the diverse types of aquatic life that live in California’s underwater state parks. The focus of this film is on ecology and aquatic diversity but also mentioned are the relationship between land and sea along California’s coastline, and the types of diving possible in individual parks.

Al Giddings; Images Unlimited Inc.

Kiel port U-Boat Memorial

Raw footage of Emory Kristof walking on bridge by Kiel. This tape include several takes of Kristof walking, leaning over rail and shots of the waterfront.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Bermuda Sub-Dive, Emory Eugene Shark Baiting

Unedited live action footage of six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait in a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The recording also includes other types of deep ocean animal life like crabs, eels and/or fish and an unidentified translucent creature. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, an edited and produced version of this recording.

Glen Warren Productions

[The Beebee Project]

Three sections are featured on this videotape. The first two sections are a documentary of two expeditions that takes place in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Bermuda. The first expedition features Eugenie Clark and Emory Kristof as they dive 1 1/2 miles deep to the ocean floor to study and record the six-gill shark, a relatively recently discovered shark that lives deep in the ocean. With the aid of bait the team and discovers that this part of the ocean floor is not as barren of animal life as once thought, and that the six-gill shark is probably both predator and scavenger to be able to live at these depths. The second expedition features a team of scientists as they dive 3000 feet deep into to mid-waters to record the bizarre and unusual sea life found at these lightless depths. The expeditions are referred to as the Beebee Project, in homage of the important discoveries made by William Beebee and Otis Barton, pioneer underwater explorers. The third section is raw footage of Joe MacInnis doing takes for presentations about undersea explorations and the human condition.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Soviet Nuclear sub stories

The recording is of several news clips featuring footage taken of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine: Komsomolets, followed by a dub of raw footage of the wreck. The news stories all discuss the fall of the Komsomolets and the possible threat of leakage from the nuclear reactors and nuclear tipped warheads that were aboard this new class of submarines. According to the newscasters, the footage was released by the Soviets to the public with hopes to entice international awareness about the threat of nuclear leakage and to receive international aid in dealing with this situation. The raw footage of the Komsomolets that follows the section of news clips features various parts of the vessel as it lies deep in the ocean. A discussion can be heard by those aboard the submersible that is recording the wreck but the conversation is completely in Russian. News clips include statements from Dr. Joe MacInnis. The capture took place in the Arctic Ocean off the coast of northern Europe.

ABC Television Network

MIR Dive - Kamchatka - Edited tape

This recording is of hydrothermal vents and surrounding chemosynthetic life deep on the ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. This recording was made by the MIR submersibles that travel with their mothership RV Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, an oceanographic research vessel. The submersibles can reach depths of 6000 meters (almost 20,000 feet).

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG Atlantic vents

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.
Deep sea sharks Bermuda 4,000' is an edited live action recording of two six-gill sharks attempting to get at bait that is inside a cage. The recording climaxes when two six-gill sharks fight mouth to mouth. The unedited version of this version can be seen in: Bermuda sub-dive roll 3; Emory Eugenie shark baiting. The recording is shot from the Mir 1 submersible as documented in: Deep Sea Sharks Bermuda 4,000, a produced version of the recording.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Technical Recognition Day

Technical Recognition Day at General Electric. Includes Joe's lecture about Breadalbane, Titanic, and Deep Sea Diving in submarines.

General Electric Corporation

Komsomolets - 6 minutes

This recording is a documentary account of the survey conducted with the aid of the Mir submersibles of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets. This expedition had visited the Komsomolets to mesure amounts of radioactive leakage coming from the shipwreck. During the dives, Mir’s mechanical arms take parts and samples and leave samplers and other objects in and around the Komsomolets.

The K-278 Komsomolets, a Soviet nuclear submarine, was launched May 9, 1983 and was lost April 7, 1989 in northern Europe in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine had an operating depth of 1000 meters and was designed with the ability to dive to 1500 meters. Aboard the vessel were torpedoes including two nuclear warheads. The submarine’s demise was caused by a fire; it sank to a depth of around 1500 meters. There were 25 survivors and 42 fatalities. The controversy surrounding the loss of this vessel has to do with radioactive contamination from the nuclear reactor and nuclear torpedoes. Leakage could potentially contaminate drinking water, affect fish population and the ecology. Several expeditions to the Komsomolets have been undertaken to probe the area. Although earlier tests showed no signs of dangerous leakage, later tests revealed this was not so. The Komsomolets has since been buried in mud to seal fractures and contain radioactive leakage.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Komsomolets - cut 1 and cut 2

This recording is a documentary account of the survey conducted with the aid of the Mir submersibles of the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets. The recording begins with an at sea memorial for sunken vessel. Next are shots of a map of the Komsomolets with certain areas marked in red, possibly where samplers and beacons will be left during the submarine dives to record radioactive leakage. Following this are dives to the sunken vessel in the Mir 1 and 2 submersibles. During the dives, Mir’s mechanical arms take parts and samples and leave samplers and other objects in and around the Komsomolets.
The K-278 Komsomolets, a Soviet nuclear submarine, was launched May 9, 1983 and was lost April 7, 1989 in northern Europe in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine had an operating depth of 1000 meters and was designed with the ability to dive to 1500 meters. Aboard the vessel were torpedoes including two nuclear warheads. The submarine’s demise was caused by a fire; it sank to a depth of around 1500 meters. There were 25 survivors and 42 fatalities. The controversy surrounding the loss of this vessel has to do with radioactive contamination from the nuclear reactor and nuclear torpedoes. Leakage could potentially contaminate drinking water, affect fish population and the ecology. Several expeditions to the Komsomolets have been undertaken to probe the area. Although earlier tests showed no signs of dangerous leakage, later tests revealed this was not so. The Komsomolets has since been buried in mud to seal fractures and contain radioactive leakage.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG - first edit

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' was recorded deep in the Atlantic Ocean. The location and date information is documented in: TAG Atlantic Vents, an edited and produced version of this recording.
TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the vent ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was probably made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Search for Adventure - 4,000 meters deep

A documentary about underwater exploration 4000 meters below sea level, where the Alvin submersible and a team of scientists explore hydrothermal vent ecology and collect samples of deep sea life and molten lava rocks. This recording is as much about the scientific exploration of hydrothermal vents and surrounding ecology as it is about the Alvin submersible and its technological capabilities. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century and are theorized to be the originators of life on earth.

Ventura California

The New Explorers: Walking among the sharks

This episode documents a deep sea submersible dive to study the lingcod and the six-gill shark. The lingcod are food fish that live in various diverse depths. The marine researchers aboard the submersibles are studying the causes and effects of the depleting lingcod populations, concentrating study on the baby lingcod population, and comparing lingcod baby numbers found in shallower depths to lingcod babies found in deep depths. As for the six-gill sharks, the goal is simply to learn more about them. The six-gill sharks are a relatively newly discovered type of shark that lives deep in the ocean. The equipment used to conduct the dives are the Deep Rover submersible, the Aquarius 2000 submersible and the Newt Suit deep diving suit. The episode is more focused on the process of underwater exploration rather than the findings that resulted from this.

Kurtis Productions

Deep water dives - Tape 1 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Newt and the Deep Rover submersibles. Trainees include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Robert Furgason, President of Texas University Corpus Christi. Dr. Joe MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 2 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents trainees learning how to pilot deep sea submersibles in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC, teaches students how to pilot the Deep Worker and the Deep Rover submersibles. Dr. Joe MacInnis pilots a submersible in the pool. Other traines include Sylvia Earl, explorer in residence at National Geographic, who helped develop the Deep Rover and Wes Turner, biology professor at Texas University Corpus Christi. The recording also contains an interview with Phil Nuytten of Nuytco Research in which he explains ideas behind the design of the Deep Worker submersible. MacInnis is behind the camera.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Deep water dives - Tape 3 of 5

The recording takes place at the Offshore Training Research Centre (OTRC) in College Station Texas. The recording is raw footage which documents Dr. Joe MacInnis learning how to pilot the deep sea submersible Deep Rover in an interior training facility. Ian Griffin of Nuytco Research, lead instructor of Training for Sustainable Seas Expeditions at OTRC is the instructor.

Discovery Channel

Lakes

In this series are moving images of underwater explorations of lakes in Canada (Lake Huron, Lake Erie) and a Russia (Lake Baikal). Also featured are items that explore the process of both underwater exploration and underwater cinematography in lake settings. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to full productions and promotional videos.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Great Lakes Seaway Queen - Tape 1 of 2

Captured at Port Dover, on the coast of Lake Eerie, Ontario Canada. This recording is raw footage with director’s comments while directing the shots of the large freighter/container ship the Seaway Queen and surrounding area. Included are shots of the ship docking, interiors and exteriors, the crew loading cargo, possibly grain, landscape and surrounding areas including the town, neighbouring boats including the ship Joshan and crew, and shots of the ship sailing away, heading into dawn.

Undersea Research Ltd.

Great Lakes Seaway Queen - Tape 2 of 2

Captured on Lake Huron, Ontario Canada.This recording is raw footage with director’s comments while directing the shots of the large freighter/container ship the Seaway Queen and surrounding area. Includes shots of the winds and water during a storm.

Undersea Research Ltd.

Shallow Water

Underwater raw footage of shallow lake, slightly washed out from the sun, some sequences have great layered effect (unidentified video artifact)

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Dive 1553 & 1554

Small fish and larva swimming in front of the camera. Mostly underwater shots with brief segment above water.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane

The items in this series all have to do with the discovery of the wreck of the HMS Breadalbane. The Breadalbane sank on August 21, 1853 in the Canadian Arctic.\~It was a British re-supply vessel sent out in search of the Franklin Expedition that had disappeared in 1846.\~Despite the fact that the Breadalbane sank only 15 minutes after colliding with ice, there were no casualties. The entire crew was rescued by the Phoenix, which was traveling with the Breadalbane. The Breadalbane shipwreck was discovered in August of 1980 by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during their 3rd search expedition. Recordings made during that expedition are in varying stages of production, from the raw footage to complete television and radio interviews.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane RPV [Remotely Piloted Vehicle] dive #2, tape 1-3 [unedited]

Captured May 9, 1981, in the Arctic Ocean in Canada's North West Passage. This recording is raw underwater footage of the Breadalbane shipwreck captured using a remote piloted vehicle (RPV, otherwise known as ROV, remote operated vehicle). This recording is almost enirely of the Breadalbane and inhabiting aquatic life. This recording is part of the Breadalbane series of tapes and therefore probably taken at the Breadalbane site in 1981 during an expedition to document and record the shipwreck by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team. The HMS Breadalbane sunk on August 21 1853 in the Canadian Arctic. It was a British re-supply vessel that was to be the last great search for the Franklin Expedition that disappeared in 1846 in search for the North West Passage. Despite the fact that the ship took only 15 minutes to sink after colliding with ice, all men were rescued aboard the Phoenix, which was traveling with the Breadalbane. The Breadalbane shipwreck was discovered in August of 1980, by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team, during their 3rd search expedition.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Breadalbane MPV underwater good from video

Notes from initial viewing: colour (faded); no narration, no sound track. Man in yellow ADS (atmospheric diving suit, possibly a WASP suit) picking up shipwreck's steering wheel, with orange coral growth. Bioluminescent sea creatures; jellyfish swimming towards WASP suit. Sea life inhabiting inside of exterior cubby shelf on Breadalbane shipwreck. WASP suit attached to cable, in mid-water. Man inside WASP suit gesturing to come closer; wipes inside of helmet with white cloth.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

General

Items from this series are items that do not fit into any of the other categories or that have not been viewed and have not been placed in another series as of yet. Some of the types of recordings in this series are raw footage of jellyfish from mid waters and CBC live coverage of Pierre Eliot Trudeau’s funeral. This series also contains oceanography related documentaries and footage of miscellaneous dives

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Titanic

The Titanic, the largest and most luxurious passenger ship in the world for her time, sank during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg. Over 1,500 people perished. In 1985, the wreck of the Titanic was found on the ocean floor by a research team led by Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel. Dr. Joe MacInnis became the first Canadian to dive to the Titanic shortly afterwards. The footage in this collection features images of the ship obtained during a 1991 dive that formed the basis of the IMAX production Titanica. Recordings are of varying stages of production from raw footage to feature length films, and include programs from television and radio.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Return to the Titanic/ Titanic Drury - 1981: Grimm Harris Expedition

A documentary account of the Grimm/Harris expedition: Titanic 1981. Using sonar & other modern scientific instruments, scientists, oceanographers & film makers battle the forces of water & wind in their second attempt to locate the Titanic. The focus of the documentary is on the technology required to search for and hopefully record the ship. This is the second of two expeditions, the first was: Titanic 1980 and has also been released by the title: Search for the Titanic.

The Titanic, a passenger ship, sunk during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15,1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912. Over 1 500 people perished. The shipwreck was discovered by a team led by Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel in 1985.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Search for the Titanic / Grimm Expedition Titanic: Orson Welles Part 1 and 2

A documentary account of the expedition: Titanic 1980. Using sonar & other modern scientific instruments, scientists, oceanographers & film makers battle the forces of water & wind in their first attempt to locate the resting place of the Titanic and film the ill-fated ship. The primary focus of the documentary is the technology involved in locating and hopefully recording the ship. However, the film includes: a biographical account of the ship, an account of the search operation for those who persished, a grave marker for an unclaimed child, interviews with survivors, and other lesser known facts surrounding the Titanic legacy. Of interest is Orson Wells report of a lesser known late 19th century author who wrote a fictional story of a ship named Titan that perished one starry April night by colliding with an iceberg; a story that foreshadows that of the Titanic. This 1980 expedition to the Titanic is the first of two, the second is: Titanic 1981, where the team has plans to take submarine dive down to the Titanic, if it can be located.

The Titanic, a passenger ship, sunk during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15,1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912. Over 1 500 people perished. The shipwreck was discovered by a team led by Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel in 1985.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

CTV News Library Dub: 2 stories from CTV news.

Two CTV news segments of the expedition to find the Titanic wreckage. 1) Sep 2/85 St. John's: Titanic Seen/Gage. This segment discusses the American research ship "Nor" in the north Atlantic Ocean searching for the Titanic. Black & white images are shown of the underwater wreckage with voice over from MacInnis. Other content include black & white historical footage of the Titanic's maiden voyage and interviews with MacInnis and Titanic survivor Eva Hart.

2) Sep 3/85 St. John's: Titanic Pictures/Pryer undiscovered for 73 years despite numerous expeditions.

CTV Television Network

Titanic News & Shows [various news broadcast clips]

A series of news recordings and shows that discuss the recent discovery of the Titanic by a Franco-American team led by Jean Louis Michel and Robert Ballard in 1985. Some of the topics discussed are: the challenges of discovering the Titanic, the preservation state of the ship, future plans of exploration and the possibility of raising the wreck. Some of those interviewed are Robert Ballard, Ralph White, Joe MacInnis as well as Eva Hart, a survivor of the Titanic.

The Titanic, a passenger ship, perished during her maiden voyage in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, two hours and forty minutes after a collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912. Over 1 500 people perished. The Titanic had remained undiscovered for 73 years despite numerous expeditions.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

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