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Oceanography
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Barton dive ext. camera on sub ; #15

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

TAG - first edit

TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' was recorded deep in the Atlantic Ocean. The location and date information is documented in: TAG Atlantic Vents, an edited and produced version of this recording.
TAG Atlantic vents 14,000' is an edited live action recording of hydrothermal vents and vent ecology at the TAG site deep on the North Atlantic Ocean floor. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century. They are theorized to be the originators of life on earth. In this recording the vent ecology consists primarily of millions of shrimp. The recording was probably made by aid of the Mir submersibles, who typically dive in pairs, one of whom can be seen recording the vents and shrimp. The scene was probably recorded in 1991, two years after an underwater volcanic eruption at that site.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

MacInnis AudioVisual Collection

  • 2005.002
  • Fonds
  • [ca. 1934-2004]

The collection consists of audio, video and film recordings made by Dr. Joe MacInnis and his team during his underwater dives from the 1970s to 2004. The bulk of the collection concerns the shipwrecks of the Titanic, the Breadalbane and the Edmund Fitzgerald. There are also many films that highlight deep sea ecology and oceanography, particularly hydrothermal vents and deep sea sharks. Most recordings in the collection consist of rough or unedited footage. The collection also includes television and radio programs on which Dr. MacInnis appeared and some video and audio recordings by MacInnis' friends and colleagues. There is a small selection of footage collected by MacInnis for research purposes, including footage of William Beebe and Otis Barton's deep sea dives in their revolutionary 'bathysphere' in 1934.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton dive sub. ext. camera on sub ; #16

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

HB test Barton dive sub. ext. camera ; #17

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording includes the launch of the submersible into the water. This recording is the first of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. Most of the recording is of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Dive to the Edge of Creation

A documentary following a team of biologists and geologists 1 1/2 miles below the ocean surface where they discover worlds of life around thermal vents which are supported by bacteria that convert chemicals into organic matter. This landmark dive confirmed aspects of the theory of plate tectonics and yielded important biological discoveries. The underwater footage was filmed from the Alvin submersible, which traveled aboard the mothership Lulu. Hydrothermal vents are one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century and are theorized to be the originators of life on earth.

National Geographic Society

Barton dive sub. ext. camera; #13

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording is one of four that documents the conversation between Barton and the other diver during the dive. The view is solely of inside the submersible and of the two men. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

Barton Sealink Dive on Deck Kristof ; #14

Recorded in the Atlantic Ocean from Harbor Branch Oceanographic. Otis Barton joins the Johnson Sea Link Sub Crew for a commemorative dive. Barton was a pioneer underwater explorer and the designer of the bathysphere (1930). This recording documents the above water conversation after the dive. This is the last of four recordings that document this commemorative dive. The bathysphere was designed by underwater explorers Otis Barton and William Beebee and took its first plunge in 1930. A bathysphere consists of a steel sphere with small circular windows of fused quartz. Inside it are the required oxygen tanks. During dives, these vessels were lowered into the water with cables and chains. During its first year, the bathysphere design could already dive to depths of 1,426 feet, two years later breaking records at 3,028 feet. Many discoveries about the deep sea were made from the confines of these vessels.

MacInnis, Joseph B.

[The Beebee Project]

Three sections are featured on this videotape. The first two sections are a documentary of two expeditions that takes place in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Bermuda. The first expedition features Eugenie Clark and Emory Kristof as they dive 1 1/2 miles deep to the ocean floor to study and record the six-gill shark, a relatively recently discovered shark that lives deep in the ocean. With the aid of bait the team and discovers that this part of the ocean floor is not as barren of animal life as once thought, and that the six-gill shark is probably both predator and scavenger to be able to live at these depths. The second expedition features a team of scientists as they dive 3000 feet deep into to mid-waters to record the bizarre and unusual sea life found at these lightless depths. The expeditions are referred to as the Beebee Project, in homage of the important discoveries made by William Beebee and Otis Barton, pioneer underwater explorers. The third section is raw footage of Joe MacInnis doing takes for presentations about undersea explorations and the human condition.

MacInnis, Joseph B.