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Fulker, John North and Central America
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Vancouver, Emily Carr School of Art

Folder consists of 6 photographic prints of the Emily Carr School of Art. The Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design is located on Granville Island, a highly successful urban precinct on the waterfront in the heart of Vancouver. The building context ranges from the small scale of single-story shops to the industrial scale of a concrete plant and the superscale of a major high-level bridge which spans over the island. The natural context of the waterfront adds a marine character to the island and the buildings which occupy it, which has both industrial and recreational dimensions.

The fundamental design problem for the building was an urban one. The building program required 60 000 square feet of studios and associated spaces, including a library and large lecture theatre, and 255 parking stalls located across the street from existing college facilities. Because subsurface conditions make building a parking garage entirely below grade impracticable, the fundamental problem was to position a college building on top of a three-story parking garage while at the same time addressing the varying scales and pedestrian-oriented character of Granville Island.

The disposition of the building volumes mediates the building?s bulk and the impact of the parking garage on the surrounding streets. The library is located at ground level, screening the garage and providing a public amenity at street level. The remaining program components are located above street level and grouped around a double-height glazed concourse space.

As is typical of construction on Granville Island, corrugated metal cladding is used for insulated walls, services are generally left exposed, and detailing is direct.

Architect: Patkau Architects / Toby Russell Buckwell and Partners.

Fulker, John

Victoria, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory

Completed in 1918, by the Canadian Government this observatory was proposed and designed by John S. Plaskett in 1910 with the support of the International Union for Cooperation in Solar Research, when the 72-inch aperture telescope was constructed, it was planned to be the largest telescope in the world but delays meant it saw first light after the Hooker 100-inch telescope.
The Centre of the Universe is the public interpretive centre for the observatory. The centre features interactive exhibits about astronomy, the work of the observatory and its parent organization, the NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics. There are also tours of the telescope and programs in the planetarium and video theatre.
The folder consists of one b&w photograph of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. On verso: "new housing for 16in. telescope operated by Dominion Astrophysical Observatory on top of Little Saanich Mountain near Victoria, B.C. is constructed of fir plywood structural assemblies. Architect was James Langford, Chief Architect with Department of Public Works, while Roger Kemble of Kemble-Webber Architects, Vancouver, was the consultant. Johnson Construction Ltd., of Victoria, were the general contractors.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 2970 Roseberry Street

Canadian Housing Design Council Winner, Award for Residential Design 1971. " An outstanding example of how a simple design ('L" shape) can be set to achieve maximum privacy and capture the joys of site and sun".

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 7235 Arbutus Place

Winner of Award for Residential Design 1971. Owner: Mr. & Mrs. HP Brasso. Extract from jury report: "A large house on a magnificent site... the planning, materials and form are well used to support the grand nature of the interior spaces and vistas to the sea".

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Bank of Canada

The building is 58.9 m.high with 15 stories. The exterior of the building is clad with precast finished with concrete panels and
columns. Bronze was used for all building metals. The Greek cross floor design allows for six corner offices per floor.

Fulker, John

Coquitlam, City hall

Folder contains 1 black and white photographic print of a miniature model of the Coquitlam City Hall. Photograph is from the CA Magazine Yearbook 1967.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, East Asiatic Centre

The East Asiatic House, built in 1963 at 1201 West Pender Street in Vancouver was architect Gerald Hamilton's first largescale exercise in New Formalism. Hamilton broke away from the typical single slab tower, instead framing a low banking pavilion with two adjoining office blocks. Sculptural wall panels of white marble create a richly textured effect and seem to float above the emerald green arched columns of the ground floor. The building's raised podium allowed an intimate front courtyard several feet above street level, the sense of calm repose accentuated by extensive plantings, fountains, and the requisite abstract sculpture.

Fulker, John

Kelowna, Caravel Hotel

Folder contains 1 b&w photograph of the interior of the Caravel Hotel in Kelowna, B.C. The photo appears to have been taken for the November 1965 issue of Canadian Architect magazine.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Graham residence

Folder contains 6 b&w photographs of the Graham Residence in West Vancouver, B.C. featured in CA Magazine July 1966. Architect was Arthur Erikson. The architectural marvel that Arthur Erickson has credited with kick-starting his career is in danger of being torn down. "The David Graham house in 1963 launched my reputation as the architect you went to when you had an impossible site, Erickson is quoted as saying in 1988's The Architecture of Arthur Erickson."

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ouno/3551583809/ http://blog.ounodesign.com/2009/05/20/goodbye-arthur-erickson/

Fulker, John

Vancouver, The Qube (1333 West Georgia Street)

Recipient of the 1970-71 Design in Steel Award from the American Iron and Steel Institute.
This building was portrayed as the "Phoenix Foundation" in the TV series, MacGyver.
Fully renovated in 1990.
This building was built from the top down. The core was built first then steel was hung from cables at the top and floors were added all the way down. The first floor starts at the fourth level. Over the years the cables have stretched so that today a pencil might roll off your desk if you're not paying attention.
Converting to 180 condominiums by mid-2005.
Known as the Westcoast Transmission Building from 1969-2000 and Duke Energy Building from 2000-2004.
Address was changed from 1333 to 1383 West Georgia in 2005 following conversion to condos.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, 6028 Eagleridge Dr

Canadian Housing Design Council Award for Residential Design 1971. Extract from jury report: "Subtle and beautifully proportioned forms and openings frame the views and the sense of exhilaration is heighened by cantilevered spaces and decks". Owners: Mr & Mrs David Catton.

Fulker, John

Mississauga, Lakeview Public Library

Photographs of the exterior of the single-storey brick building, with flower beds lining the parking lot and a view of the lawn in the rear. A sticker on the back of one of the photographs gives the details of this building's entry into the OMRC Annual Design Awards by Anthony Kemp, Architects.

Applied Photography Ltd.

Vancouver, False Creek

Folder consists of a number of photographs of the False Creek townhouses and the surroudning urban landscape. Many of the photographs contain caption and information for articles on the back.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Edgemont Terrace

Folder consists of 4 b&w photographs of Edgemond Terrace in Vancouver, B.C. The architects on the project were Wilding & Norman S. Jones, M.A.I.B.C., President.

Mr. Jones received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of British Columbia in 1957. Later he was awarded the B.C. Electric Post Graduate Fellowship for study in Europe. Mr. Jones became a registered member of the Architectural Institute of B.C. and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada in May 1960. He has been in private practise continuously
since that time.

Awards and Recognitions:

Canadian Housing Design Council Awards
Edgemont Terraces, North Vancouver, BC

Fulker, John

Victoria, Centennial Square Project

Mayor Roderick Finlayson's first objective after his election to office in January of 1878 was to erect a city hall. Overriding the opinions of the townsfolk who considered the whole idea an unnecessary extravagance, $10,000 was allocated and a competition announced for plans. The winner was John Teague. City Hall was to contain a corn market, surveyors' quarters, apartments for the assessor, a jail, a police court, a council chamber, committee rooms, and a museum gallery. The final form was a rectangular block, now comprising the south wing of the present City Hall. A good example of the Second Empire style, it is built in red brick with a tin mansard roof. The 1881 addition consisted of a small wing on the south-west corner for the Fire Department. In 1891 City Council approved a bylaw for the borrowing of $35,000 for the completion of the northeast addition. The new wing added to the existing building constitutes the present City Hall as it is seen today. In 1891, the main entrance was moved to the base of the tower block at the center of the Douglas elevation. The facade is divided into three bays, the projecting center bay carries the thrust of the 140-foot-tall brick and stone tower block. The entrance is further accented by a balustrade over the indented porch. On May 6, 1891, C.E. Redfern was awarded the contract for the installation of the clock which had been manufactured by Messrs. Gillet & Johnson of Croydon, Surrey, England. Four 500-pound dials each 706 inches in diameter and the 2,170 pound bell had to be lifted into place. The clock requires winding once a week. Since 1891 there have been no major alternations, except those connected with the Centennial Square project in 1963. At this time the interior was completely renovated and an International Style addition was constructed at the west end. This was carried out by the architectural firms of Wade, Stockdill, Armour & Partners and R.W. Siddall & Associates, under the direction of Rod Clack, city architectural consultant and director of special planning projects.
Architect: John Teague
Additions: Wade, Stockdill, Armour, R.W. Sidall, R. Clack

http://www.maltwood.uvic.ca/Architecture/ma/urban_planning/centennial_square/city_hall.html
The focal point is a fountain, its balustraded rim reminiscent of pieces from Oscar Niemeyer's Brazilia scheme (1958), and the mosaic concrete totems by local artist J.C.S. Wilkinson. The fountain was a centennial gift to the City from neighbouring municipalities.
This folder also contains photographs of the Civic Square in Victoria, B.C from June 1965.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Burrard Marina

Located within the inner harbour of Vancouver, at the area known as False Creek, it functions to satisfy the needs of the average citizen with small boats (up to 40 ft.). The Marina is equipped with toilet facilities, a lounge with food vending machines, office for the manager and a caretaker suite.

Fulker, John

Vancouver, Courthouse

The provincial law courts are housed in a building designed by well known architect Arthur Erickson who created a building with an incredibly massive glass roof. From the aerial view you can also see the equally large reflecting pond that stretches out above Smythe St. Many of the lawyers and judges have lunch at the restaurant that looks out over this water feature and is open to the general public.
Folder also includes a photographic print of the Habitat Pavilion from June 1980 issue of Canadian Architect magazine. The project received an honour award and was built by Arthur Erikson Architects. The owner of the building is the Government of Canada.

Scott, Simon