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Bass Stereoscopic Photography Collection
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Ultimate stickers (Star bright design)

Item contains anaglyph three-dimensional set of viewing glasses and six three-dimensional viewing stickers, manufactured by Star Bright Design. This item was designed and marketed as a novelty child's toy. The anaglyph three-dimensional effect is caused by using two different coloured filters, typically red and cyan, on lenses. The viewing stickers have the same two colours added to the image, however, the subjects of the stickers are captured at slightly different perspectives. Once viewed through the glasses, the images superimpose onto each other creating a three dimensional image.

Sawyer's 3D view master

Item is a handheld view master manufactured by Swayer's Inc first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). Reel has 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of Hollywood, California landmarks. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Originally this item was meant as an educational tool for adults but quickly became a popular children's toy. Item is made of plastic and metal. Reels are interchangeable and come with a variety of themes.

Electric view master stereoscope (model D)

Item is a brown handheld electric view master first manufactured by Swayer's Inc and first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). Once pressed down the lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Unlike previous view masters, this view master comes with a built in back light attached to an electrical cord. Once turned on the back light illuminates transparencies on view. Item is made of plastic and metal. Reel has 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of The Atlas of Human Anatomy, Head and Neck.

Mercury stereoscope viewer (H.C. White Co.)

This item is a handheld metal and wood Holmes style stereoscope. The metal viewer has flower and leaf details engraved with fabric lining the metal eyepiece. This object was used to view two nearly identical images, or stereographs, as one three-dimensional photograph. The mercury stereoscope was manufactured by H.C. White Company, a main manufacturer of Holmes style stereoscopes. White obtained several patents for his high quality stereographs and stereoscopes. In 1907, White made the most mechanized stereo publishing facility in the world. The entire photo printing process was automatic to ensure a uniform standard. The H.C. White company produced three standard stereoscopes: wood, wood and metal, and all metal.

Sterling stereo viewer

Item is a plastic view master decorated with imitation marble. This object was used to view reels of transparency images. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed.

1-2-3D instant stereo

This item is a plastic black stereo adaptor designed for Robins Industries Corporation's J-33 and J-66 Polaroid cameras. This object also contains the "2 for 1" film saver device. Item comes in its original box with its original manual. Item was intended to capture two identical images from a Robins Polaroid camera to be viewed through the stereo adaptor and create the impression of a three-dimensional image.

Perfecscope viewer

Item is a Holmes style handheld stereoscope manufactured by H.C.White Company. Item is made of aluminium and wood with velvet around the viewer hood. The viewer is adorned with floral engraving. Slide holding the card is removable and adjustable to user's vision. Handle folds onto viewer. This item was used to view stereographs. "Exposition-Universelle Internationale, 1900" is branded on top of the viewer hood. Written on item: USA patent Oct.15.1895, June 3.1902; FEBY.1.1898 B.S.G.D.G. Great Britain, Austria, Belgium; Canada, France, Germany DRMG NO.53803; Patent July 24 1883. H.C. White Company was a main manufacturer of Holmes style stereoscopes. White obtained several patents for his high quality stereographs and stereoscopes. In 1907, White made the most mechanized stereo publishing facility in the world. The entire photo printing process was automatic to ensure a uniform standard. The H.C. White company produced three standard stereoscopes: wood, wood and metal, and all metal.

Fairchild stereoscope binocular model F-17

This item is a metal stereoscope binocular viewer with extendable legs and mirrored sides. This object was used to view aerial photographs and survey maps of land. In the 1920's Fairchild Aviation became the second-largest manufacturer of commercial air planes and fourth largest aviation organization in the United States of America. Written on item: "No. 40-1749."

Stereo-graphoscope viewer

This item is a handheld stereoscope made entirely of wood and has binocular style adjustable lenses. Handle folds onto viewer. Written on bottom of viewer: USA. APR. 23; 1889. OCT.15.1895; CANADA FEB.1996; FRANCE B.S.G.D.G; GREAT BRITAIN, GERMANY, AUSTRIA, AND BELGIUM."

Red velvet hand-held stereoscopic viewer

Item is a wood and metal hand-held stereoscope with a red velvet viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden Holmes style hand-held viewer

This item is a hand held Holmes style stereoscope. This item is entirely made of wood and has a binocular-like viewer. Handle folds back onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Monarch stereoscope viewer

This item is a hand held stereoscope made of wood and aluminium. The hood of the viewer is adorned with a floral engraving and a seal of a deer. The viewer is lined with velvet. The handle is able to bend back onto the viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. The hood is designed to keep out additional light.

Written on object: "Manufactured Keystone View Co. Meadville, PA. Patented 1904"

Wooden hand held viewer with ornate edge (unknown)

Item is a wooden hand-held stereoscope with an ornate details around the viewer hood. Handle folds down onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a handheld wooden stereoscope viewer. Card slide can bend to become more compact. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Sun sculpture stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

This item is a aluminium and wood hand held Holmes style stereoscope manufactured by Underwood & Underwood. Viewer hood is made of aluminium and lined with velvet. On top of the hood is a Underwood & Underwood brand between leaf detailing. Handle can fold back onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object: manufactured by Underwood & Underwood New York Patented June 11, 1901 Foreign Patents Applied For.

Metal hand held stereoscopic viewer

Item is a hand held metal stereoscope with a wooden handle. Viewer is lined with velvet. Hood of viewer is engraved with leaf design and branded with the TR trademark. Handle is able to bend back onto viewer.This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Sculptscope viewer (Whiting)

This item is a large metal circular shaped stereoscope with glass flower designs on the sides. This coin operated stereoscope activates a mechanism that turns a metal belt containing built in stereographs. Richard R. Whiting formed the American Novelty Company in Cincinnati, Ohio. Whiting developed and sold stereoscopes from the 1880s till the mid-1900s. He manufactured the sculptoscope in 1925. The sculptoscope was commonly seen in arcades and cigar shops. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder then users would look through the lenses hood which would overlap the two images to mimic a three-dimensional effect. The sculptoscope uses a simple trigger for actuation. The counterweight cylindrical foot in front the viewer holds it in a comfortable viewing position and acts as a coin box. The top of the viewer has a plain glass window to illuminate the stereoviews and allow the user to look at the back of the previous card. A penny releases a set of 15 views to be show.

Patent # 1, 436, 742 (November 28, 1922).

Whiting, Richard R.

Kodaslide stereo viewer I

Item is a plastic and metal stereo viewer used to observe reels of Kodak colour three-dimensional transparencies. Knob on the side switches transparencies.

Written on box: "Focus and interocular adjustments, takes all standard stereo mounts, operates anywhere-converts to 110-volt"

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden handheld Holmes style stereoscope. Handle bends back onto viewer. Hood of viewer is lined with red velvet. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Sawyer's lighted view master (model F)

Item is a brown Sawyer's View-Master with a internal light meant to illuminate the backs of transparencies. Item comes with 1reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies showing famous global landmarks and world events. White push down lever on the right side rotates reel to next slide.

Stereo-rama viewer

Item is a grey plastic View Master manufactured by Stereo-Rama. On top of item is a slot filled by a GAF view master reel. Reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting famous landmarks and vernacular photographs. Item comes in original black and yellow checker patterned box. Black push down lever on the right rotates reels to next slide. Written on object : Technofilm Milan, Made in Italy.

Sun sculpture hand held stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

Item is a hand held Holmes style stereoscope made of wood and aluminium. Viewer hood is lined with velvet and engraved with a leaf pattern. Handle folds onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images have overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object: Warranted Underwood & Underwood Manufacturers New York Patent Applied For.

View master gift-pak (Sawyer's)

This item is a view master gift-pak. The brown view master is made of plastic and metal with a small lever on the right side. When pushed down the lever rotates the reel inside. There are 7 separate Kodafilm reels of 16 mm transparencies depicting landscapes and landmarks throughout North American. Item comes in original box with a catalogue of optional View Master reels.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

Item is a wooden hand held Holmes style stereoscope. Handle is able to bend back onto the viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images have overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Underwood & Underwood New York. Written in viewer hood : Pat. Applied For.

Red and white view master (GAF)

Item is a red and white view master with a blue lever on the right side designed to switch transparencies on the reel. Item comes with one GAF reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting a episode from the TV show "Happy Days." Reels are interchangeable. Written on object: Made in USA GAF corporation Portland, Oregon T.M.REG. US.Pat.OFF. MARC REG.-MARQUE DEPOSEE

Sun sculpture hand held stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

Item is a hand held wooden stereoscope manufactured by Underwood & Underwood. Viewer hood is made of aluminium and is adorned with floral engravings. Handle folds back onto viewer and card slider can be adjusted. Written on top of item : Sun Sculpture U&U trademark. Written on handle : Man'f'd by Underwood & Underwood, New York, June 11, 1901, Foreign Patent Applied For. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images have overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Handheld stereoscope viewer (Joseph L. Bates)

Item is a handheld wooden Holmes style stereoscope with cardboard hood, adjustable card slide and removable handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : patented Aug 13th 1867. JLB is engrave in the eyepiece.

Micky mouse view master 3-D

Item is a plastic view master manufactured by View-Master and built in the shape of Disney character Mickey Mouse. Item is in original packaging and comes with promotional l three-dimensional reel of colour Disney scenes featuring Mickey Mouse and friends. Push down lever on the right is used to rotate reel. Reels are interchangeable. Item is designed as a child’s toy.

Hand held stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a handheld stereoscopic viewer made entirely of wood. Item comes with a sliding card holder and handle folds back onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images have overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden handheld stereoscope viewer with metal rails (unknown)

Item is a wooden hand held stereoscopic viewer with an adjustable metal rail attached to a stereograph slide viewer. Hood is made of cardboard. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two image overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Stereo-graphoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden stereoscope with binocular like lenses and a wooden hood. Stereograph card holder does not slide and handle bends onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : USA Patent April 28, Canada, France, Great Germany and 1889 Oct 16 1895 and Feb 1896 B.S.G.D.G Britain Austria Belgium.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer with black suede hood (unknown)

Item is a handheld stereoscope made from dark wood. Viewer hood is covered in a black suede. Sliding card holder is attached to a small wheel that glides over stereoscope extension. Handle can be detached. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two image overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a wooden hand held stereoscope with expandable slide viewer. Hood is wooden with binocular styled eye holes. Handle is removable. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two image overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd April 23.89.

Mercury stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

This item is a handheld metal and wood Holmes style stereoscope. The metal viewer has engravings of flower and leaf details with red fabric lining the metal eyepiece. Slide holder is adjustable and handle folds back onto the viewer. "Mercury Stereoscope Trade Mark" is branded on top of the viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Underwood & Underwood New York Pat'd July 28'02 & May 01'06.

Handheld metal hood stereoscope viewer (unknown)

This item is a handheld wooden Holmes style stereoscope. The hood is made of metal and engraved with a floral pattern. Lens openings are framed by metal. Red velvet lines the viewer hood. Slide holder is adjustable and handle folds back onto itself. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd July.

Hand held wooden stereoscope viewer with cardboard hood (unknown)

This item is a handheld wooden Holmes style stereoscope. The hood is made of cardboard painted to imitate wood grain. Slide holder is adjustable. Handle is detachable. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd Dec.7.1875.

Wooden handheld stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a handheld Holmes style wooden stereoscope with wooden hood, adjustable card slide and handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden and brass hand-held viewer with ornate edge (unknown)

Item is a brass and wooden hand held stereoscope. The hood is decorated with an ornate edge. Handle is removable. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Patent 1866.

Wooden stereoscope viewer with handle (unknown)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with cardboard hood, adjustable card slide and handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd June '74.

Wood and metal stereoscope viewer with handle (unknown)

This item is a handheld wooden Holmes style stereoscope. The viewer hood is made of metal. Slide holder is adjustable and handle is missing. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden handheld stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with wooden hood, adjustable card slide and handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Hand held wooden stereoscope viewer with cardboard hood (unknown)

This item is a handheld wooden Holmes style stereoscope. The hood is made of cardboard painted to imitate wood grain. Slide holder is adjustable. Handle is detachable.This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd Dec.7.1875.

Black metal handheld stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a black Holmes style handheld metal stereoscope viewer hood, adjustable card slide and handle. Handle can bend back onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden handheld stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with wooden hood and handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Sun sculpture hand held stereoscope viewer (Underwood & Underwood)

Item is a hand held wooden stereoscope manufactured by Underwood & Underwood. Viewer hood is made of aluminium, lined with velvet and adorned with floral engravings. Handle folds back onto viewer and card slider can be adjusted. Written on top of item : Sun Sculpture U&U trademark. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images have overlapped to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on handle : Man'f'd by Underwood & Underwood, New York, June 11, 1901, Foreign Patent Applied For. Written on Hood : BASS.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer with metal orange and black hood (unknown)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with metal hood, adjustable card slide and handle. Metal hood has an orange and black stripped design and lined with fabric. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Wooden hand held stereoscope viewer with cardboard hood (American Lens)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with cardboard hood, adjustable card slide and handle. Handle is detachable. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Written on object : American Lens Trademark Stereoscope. A clenched fist is branded into the top of the card slide holder.

Exposition universelle interinationale stereoscope viewer (H.C. White)

Item is a wooden handheld Holmes styled stereoscope and a red velvet lined aluminium hooded viewer. Hood has floral engravings and branded with the H.C. White Co. medallion in the centre. Handle bends back onto viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Written on object : Pat'd July 28.03 Pat'd. July.23.03.

Wooden handheld stereoscope viewer (unknown)

Item is a Holmes style handheld wooden stereoscope with wooden hood and handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Collapsible wooden tabletop stereoscope (unknown)

This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Item is a American style tabletop design made entirely of wood. Viewer lenses and card holder are able to collapse onto the base to be more compact. Shutters cover glass lenses for protection.

Polyorama stereoscopic viewer (unknown)

This item is a handheld stereoscope made of wood and brass. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder, next binocular like lenses can be twisted until adjusted to the user's vision. This merges the two images to mimic a three-dimensional effect. A hood on the top of viewer is designed to allow light to illuminate stereograph. Object comes with one glass plate stereograph of Windsor Castle, England.

Magical stereoscope (unknown)

Item is a handheld stereoscope made from wood, plastic and cardbaord. Item was originally designed as a child's toy. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder merging the two images to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Stereoscope comes with 12 paper black and white stereographs of animals at the zoo. Written on object : Magical Stereoscope.

Whiting's magic photo album stereoscope

Item is a stamped metal viewer. This object can collapse into a flat tin box. Inside object contains various themes of 12 standard sized hand coloured stereograph cards. Some examples include colonialist representations of non-European cultures, scenic poems, landscapes, religious iconology and World Fair Events. Object can be used as a photo album and a tabletop stereoscope.

Written on object: Whitting's Magic Photo Album Educator.

Wooden stereoscope with binocular lenses (JCA Dresden)

This item is a handheld stereoscope with binocular lenses made from wood and brass. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. First, the stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder, next the holder would be adjusted with the turning knob on the right. This would merge the two images together until they mimic a three-dimensional effect. Object comes with one glass plate stereograph of 3 soldiers and 2 women dressed in Victorian clothing smiling while walking on a bridge in front of a hill.

The pocket rotoscope stereoscope

Item is a novelty compact collapsible tinplate stereoscope given as a premium from cigarette brands. The cover of the object is built in the shape of a small book. It is detailed with green, gold and yellow floral designs. Once item is unlocked, a viewer with small lenses pops out parallel to a small folding card holder. The lenses slide in and out horizontally and the built in round topped frame move back and forth. Object was built like this to allow the user to focus. Stereoviews are 40 mm. Viewing lenses are 60 mm in focal length. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.This stereoscope comes with 12 black and white silver gelatin stereographs of Victorian Celebrities.

Written on object : The Pocket Rotoscope The Rotary Photographic Co. Lo. 12 New Union St. London, E.C. Works, West Drayton, Midd With 12 Real Photographic Stereograms Views, Staturary, Celebrities, Children, Comic Scenes, Etc. Patented Ro. No. 442.342.

Leather polyorama stereoscopic viewer (unknown)

This item is a handheld stereoscope made of wood and covered in leather. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder, next binocular like lenses can be twisted until adjusted to the user's vision. This merges the two images to mimic a three-dimensional effect. A hood on the top of viewer is designed to allow light in & illuminate stereograph. The later is adorned with gold leaf detailing.

Hand held accordion fold stereoscope viewer

Item is a hand-held wooden viewer, base and handle attached to a metal accordion fold. Handle is able to bend back onto viewer. This sterescope was built with a card holder and hood to protect eyes from additional light that could disrupt the image.

Written on object : Patented Jul 5. 1870 & Mar.26.1878.

Wooden stereoscope with binocular lenses (Universal)

This item is a handheld stereoscope with binocular lenses made from wood and brass. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. First, the stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder, next the two images would merge together to mimic a three-dimensional photograph. Object comes with one 35 mm black and white film transparency of doctors and nurses assisting injured people off a Red Cross train at a train station.

Wooden stereoscope with binocular lenses

This item is a handheld stereoscope with binocular lenses made from wood and plastic. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. First, the stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder. Once viewed through the viewer the two images would merge together to mimic a three-dimensional photograph. Object comes with one glass plate stereograph of a smiling woman holding a purse while rowing a boat in a river.

Cardboard stereoscope with binocular lenses (unknown)

This item is a handheld stereoscope with binocular lenses made from cardboard. The body of the stereoscope is able to extend. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would first be placed in the sliding card holder. Once viewed through the viewer the two images would merge together to mimic a three-dimensional photograph. Object comes with one glass plate stereograph of a elaborately designed baroque room.

Newman stereoscopic viewer

This item is a metal and plastic stereoscopic viewer. Manufacturing plate is screwed on top of viewer. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Lenses can be adjusted by dial on top of viewer. Written on object : Newman Broun Corp. New York, N.Y.

Tin stereoscope viewer (De Jong)

Item is a compact green tin stereoscope viewer adorned with a gold leaf and painted floral design. Item is collapsible. Manufacture's brand is stamped between viewer lenses. Item comes with two silver gelatin stereoscopes from the Pocket Rotoscope a different manufacture of stereoscope viewers and stereographs. Images show portraits of celebrity women from the 20th century. Both women wear Victorian style costumes. Dutch text written on object suggests that item was a promotional stereoscope for a Chocolate and Cocoa company. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Brown and white tin hand held stereoscopic viewer

Item is a compact, collapsible brown and white tin hand held viewer. Item comes with 50 lithographic stereograph cards of wild and domesticated animals. The first three cards in the collection are a table of contents explaining imagery in stereographs. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

The corete-scope stereoscopic viewer

Item is a black metal hand held stereoscope with collapsible handle. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect.

Series 53 boxset: midnight sun north-cape and the norwegian fjords

Item is a stereoscopic box set and comes with one collapsible black hoodless stereoscope and 53 silver gelatin stereographs of Midnight Sun North-Cape and The Norwegian Fjords. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Associated with the Stella Polaris cruising ship. Written on object: Original Indupor Patent Made In Germany.

Stereo-phot stereoscopic viewer

This item is a handheld stereoscope made of wood and plastic. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the card holder, next binocular like lenses would be adjusted with a knob to fit the user's vision. This merges the two images together mimicing a three-dimensional effect. Body of viewer imitates a polyorama stereoscope. Item comes with one colour transparency stereograph of a Marina filled with yachts.

Written on stereograph : Shelter Island Marina - August 1992

Shomescope stereoscopic viewer

This item is a stereoscopic viewer made of a wooden compact case and concave mirror manufactured by Shomescope Manufacturing Company. A photograph would be placed facing the mirror to produce a three-dimensional effect. Three slits are built into the base of the case to hold photographs. Compact front has original label taped over with a mylar protection layer. Bottom of compact has small metal decorations in the corners branded with Shomescope.

Written on object : Trade Shomescope Mark Patented March 26, 1914 Shomescope Mfg. Co. Kansas City, Mo

World War 2 recovery centre and family photography album with stereoscopic viewer

Item is a cardboard boxed filled with 54 stereoscopic images. Item comes with one handheld, compact, metal accordion fold black stereoscope. This object was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the sliding card holder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Images are vernacular photographs sent to A.P. Manners Ltd. to develop, print, and then return images to photographers. Written by previous owners on a small yellow post-it-note : recoverying from W.W. II English Military Sectary.

Written on box : A.P. Manners Ltd. Finest Quality Developing, Printing, Enlarging and 35 mm Process In Services Photographic and Cine Specialists, 11 Westover Road, Bournemouth.

Stereoscopic Cameras

Series consists of 17 cameras designed to take identical images of the same subject from two lenses, approximately 2.5 inches apart or the same distance between human eyes. Cameras are able to make stereo pairs or single images. Cameras in this series range between ca.1850 and ca.1996.

The stereoscope was invented by Charles Wheatstone in 1838 to demonstrate binocular vision and its role in depth perception. Wheatstone used a pair of drawings to show how each eye could see a slight difference in each image, until the single images are superimposed onto each other through a stereoscope, revealing a three-dimensional effect. With the later establishment of photography, creation of Sir David Brewster's portable stereoscope in 1894 and the introduction of the wet-plate collodion process in 1851, did the stereoscopic industry rise to popularity.

Prior to the development of stereo-cameras, a single camera was used to produce either two daguerreotypes or calotypes in succession. The camera would be moved a few inches to one side between exposures in an attempt to produce pictures that looked identical or what was seen by the two eyes. However, this method was based off trial and error, as the quality of the three-dimensional effect might have been compromised by inadequate distance between exposures or alteration of camera angle, subject, and lighting conditions.

The two basic camera types designed to produce stereoscopic pairs are the single-lensed and double-lensed cameras. The double-lensed or binocular cameras allowed photographers to make simultaneous exposures for more accurate stereo photographs. The increasing demand for stereo imagery called for more portable cameras. Field cameras that folded to a compact size enabled photographers to leave the studio and produce stereos outdoors or previously inaccessible places. Later camera designs would have a standard format of 23x 24 mm with a focal length of 35mm and faster shutter speeds.

3D single use camera (ImageTech)

Item is a single-use 3D camera with original film and box. Camera comes with shutter release, view finder, triple lens, exposure counter and film advance thumbwheel. Item uses high resolution colour film. Prints are processed at manufacturer then sent back to user, as a result the camera comes with self-addressed envelope to the ImageTech processing centre.

Kodak Stereo Camera (Kodak)

Item is a stereo camera made of metal and plastic. Camera takes pairs of 24 x 24 mm exposures on 35 mm film. Uses f3.5/35 mm lenses. Item comes with brown leather case branded with Kodak on the front and lens cap.

Stereo box camera (Eho)

Item is a black double lenses box stereo camera similar to the size and shape of a Brownie. Makes 5 stereo pairs sized 6 x13cm or 10 single sized 6x6cm. Exposure on 120 and B,I shutter. Written on item: duplar 1:11. Branded with Echo trademark on front between lenses.

Personal stereo camera with leather case (Sawyers Inc.)

Item is a black View-Master Personal Stereo camera manufactured by Sawyers Inc. in a light brown leather case. This item was designed for users to make their own view-master slides. Camera made 69, 12 x 13 mm stereo pairs. Film was wound twice through the camera. Anastigmat lenses: f3.5/25 mm. 1/10-1/100 shutter. Instructions on exposure and shutter speed written directly on camera. Branded on leather case : View-Master Personal Stereo.

Verascope stereo camera (Jules Richard)

Item is a french metal stereoscopic camera manufactured by Jules Richard. Brand on the back of the camera states that this object was manufactured in Paris, France then retailed through Felix Neumann Photohaus Studio in Austria. Manufactures typically branded studio names to personalize retailer items. This object was considered one of the most successfully designed stereo camera placed on the market during the 20th century. The face of the object has two bioncular lenses to take dual exposures. Camera is made completely of metal including a hinge direct viewfinder on the side, and viewfinder on the top of the camera sitting between the lenses. Lenses are two fixed focus anastigmatic lenses smaller than normal camera lenses with a focal length of 55 mm. Can be opened to f4-5, F8, or F16. The plate box at the back of the camera holds twelve 45 x 107 mm glass negatives. Plates were advanced by a sliding action from a hinged handle. Holder also contains a built-in exposure counter.

Written on object : Verascope BTE S.C.D.G. Brevetes SGDE R.F. Paris Felix Neumann Photohaus Wien I. Michglasses 1

Revere 33 stereo camera

This item is a three-dimensional stereo rangefinder camera designed with two lenses to simultaneously expose two frames at once. The images produced can be inserted into a stereoscope and viewed at as a three-dimensional image. F3. 5-22/35mm amaton lenses in a MFX-synch Rapax shutter, T,B, 1/2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 automatic or manual. Emblem of Revere Campera Co. brand on face of camera. Item also comes with a Revere brown leather case and brown and white stripe shoulder strap. Item takes 23x25mm stereo pairs, lenses spaced 70 mm.

Carved into camera is a serial number : 425-082-138

Haneel tri-vision stereoscopic camera

This item is a plastic and metal stereo camera manufactured by Haneel Camera Tri Vision. Camera is able to take three-dimensional and single images. Comes with Lestra-Lite color corrected lens. Features include snap back cover,internal spool to load film. The winding knob on top of the camera turns and secures film. Each camera takes 6 sets of nearly identical pictures on a roll of film. Left (L), Centre (C), and Right (R) are written on the back of the object above three small red windows. L, C, and R are designed to prevent double exposures on film. To take a single image, the lens cap is placed over the left hand lens, then shot, turn the spool, cover the the right hand lens with the lens cap and shot again. The three adjustments on the aperture are marked small F:16, medium F:11 and large F:8.

Yashica-mat TLR (Yashica)

Item is a twin lens reflex (TLR) camera. Body is very similar to the Rolleiflex. 6x6 cm on 120 mm. Aut-stop winding, yashinon f3.5/80mm lens, copal-MXV, B 1 sec 1/500 shutter. Item also comes with a brown case and strap, written on case "Yashica-Mat."

Stereoscope Viewers

Series contains stereoscopic viewers, photographic images, and emphera. This includes a wide range of stereoscopes and three-dimensional viewers. Stereoscopes are devices used to view two mounted identical images as a single three-dimensional photograph commonly referred to as stereographs or stereoviews.

The first lens-based, portable stereoscopes were invented by Sir David Brewster in 1849 and presented at Crystal Palace during the London Great Exhibition between 1850 to 1851. Until a decade later when Oliver Wendell Holmes' adaptation of the Brewster stereoscope became the model for all later editions of stereoviewers during the 19th century. Holmes left his invention unpatented. This allowed other manufactures such as H.C. White, Underwood & Underwood and Keystone Viewing Company to mimic his design and increase production of stereoscopes and stereoviews. Ultimately, Holmes' decision would increase production and purchase of his invention.

Stereoscopes and stereo ephemera were meant for educational and entertainment purposes. Designs ranged from various materials like wood and aluminium, stereoscopes also had a large array of shapes and sizes from hand held to table top.

Following the 20th century, three-dimensional viewers became extremely popular. Some major manufactures such as GAF, Sawyer's View-Master and Tru-View produced iconic viewers made from metal, bakelite and other plastics. Originally, viewers and viewer emphera were developed for educational purposes but eventually became marketed as children's entertainment. Unlike stereoscopic viewers that could only look at single card stereoviews, three-dimensional viewers typically rotated black and white or colour transparency reels or multiview cards. Many original companies such as Sawyer's and GAF merged together but maintained the "View-Master" name. In 1989, the view-master brand was sold to Tycho until 1997 when Mattel and Tyco joined together. Now, view-masters are produced under the Fisher-Price title. View-masters were made from various materials and sizes. Some editions included built-in back lighting and sound recordings.

Stereo camera #9 (Seneca)

Item is a double lensed camera with retractable front. View finder is outside the body of the camera. Comes in a leather covered wood body. Folding-bed collapsible bellows view. Wide front lens board, Wollensak lenses, automatic double valve stereo shutter.

3D binocular viewfinder camera (Coronet)

Item is a plastic stereo camera typically found through mail order catalogues. For 4.5 x 5 cm exposures on 127 mm roll film. Shutter speed 1/50. Twin f11 menscus fixed focal lenses. Lens are labelled as 1 and 2. Written on item: Bioncular viewfinder patents applied for, coronet 3-D, present use 127 film, to take 8 picture close cover blase over No.1 lens make exposures on every number from 1 to 8, to take 4 pairs stereo picture open cover blase over no.1 lens. make exposures only on odd numbers (1, 3, 5 and 7), use no. 127 roll film.

3D binocular viewfinder camera (Coronet)

Item is a plastic three-dimensional stereo camera with binocular viewfinder. This item makes 4 stereo pairs or 8 single images, exposure is 4.5 x 5 cm on 127 mm roll film. The single shutter-speed is 1/50, twin f11 meniscus fixed-focus lenses, lenses are separated by 53 mm. Instructions on how to use the camera on labelled on the back of the object by manufacturer. Item has simple uncoated lenses with flash contacts on the right side.

Sesame street Big Bird view master

Item is a plastic view master manufactured by TYCO Industries and built in the shape of Sesame Street character Big Bird. The 3D viewer is in original packaging and comes with a reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies depicting Sesame Street scenes featuring Big Bird and friends. Orange push down lever on the right is used to switch reel image. Reels are interchangeable.

View-master stereoscope (Sawyer's)

Item is a handheld View-Master manufactured by Swayer's Inc and first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). The 3D viewer is made of plastic and metal. Reel shows 7 diametrical, 16 mm kodachrome transparencies of famous global landmarks. The push-down lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time. Reels are interchangeable and come with a variety of themes often ordered through a View-Master catalogue.

Sawyer's Inc.

Tru-Vue viewer box set (Tru-Vue company)

Item is a brown plastic 3D viewer built with a push-down lever between the lenses. The lever is designed to rotate a reel containing three-dimensional black and white 35 mm acetate film manufactured by Tru-Vue Company. Images are inserted through the slot on the left side of the lenses. Item comes with square plastic windows to illuminate backs of transparencies on view. Once the film is circulated, it rewinds itself on the right-hand side of the viewer. Item comes in original box with 4 original films depicting the Grand Canyon's major landmarks.

Written on object : Tru-View Rock Island, Ill. U S PAT. 90564 Made in U.S.A. Written on box : Fifty-Six Scenes Of The Grand Canyon Of Arizona In Three Dimensional Photography.

Kodaslide stereo viewer I

Item is a plastic and metal 3D viewer used to observe reels of Kodak colour three-dimensional transparencies. Knob on the side switches transparencies. Item comes in original box.

Written on box: " For life-like pictures in 3 dimensions. Focus and interocular adjustments, takes all standard stereo mounts, operates anywhere-converts to 110-volt"

Tri-vision stereoscopic viewer (Haneel)

Item is a black stereoscopic view master manufactured by Haneel Tri-Vision. Viewer is made from plastic and metal. Viewer's eyepieces are adjustable to user's vision when focusing on image. This item is designed to hold one stereographic three-dimensional transparency. Transparency can be inserted through the slot on the top of the viewer. Item comes with square plastic windows used to illuminate backs of transparencies on view.

Written on object : Haneel Tri-Vision Pat'd 2349013

Sawyer's View-Master Stereo Viewer (model C)

Item is a handheld plastic black Model C View-Master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. from the mid-1940's to mid-1950's. This model was the first of its kind to have a slot for reels to be placed in for viewing. The metal lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, the user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three-dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. Later Model C editions came with an attachable bulb. The object comes with Royal Canadian Mountain Police sticker.

Written on object : Sawyer's View-Master Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. Can Pat.406893 Other Pat. Pend. U.S. Pat. 2189285. Brit. Pat. 538492. Made in U.S.A. Other Pat. Pend. Portland-Ore.

Kodaslide Stereo Viewer I

Item is a brown handheld electronic stereoscopic viewer manufactured by Kodak. Lenses adjustment and focus are controlled by a small brown knob on the right and switch on the top of eye lenses.
This 3D viewer was used to view two nearly identical photographs, or stereographs, as one three dimensional image. The stereograph would be placed in the cardholder and adjusted to fit the user's vision until the two images overlap to mimic a three-dimensional effect. Typically, this object would take transparencies from reels or cards. The light within the object would illuminate the back of the transparency to heighten the experience.

3D stereobox stereoscopic viewer

Item is a green plastic view master with original box packaging. Three-dimensional colour transparency reel depicts frontier puppets. Reels are interchangeable. Reels are inserted into the top of the view master and switched by the plastic push down lever on the side.

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