Imprimir vista previa Cerrar

Mostrando 4 resultados

Descripción archivística
Lantern Slide Collection Unidad documental simple Con objetos digitales
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

Biunial Magic Lantern

A large biunial mahogany and brass magic lantern. Biunial or double lens projectors have two separate optical systems that allow transition effects such as dissolves between slides.

Improved Phantasmagoria Lantern

A black tin Improved Phantasmagoria Lantern with handle and crooked chimney.

Carpenter marketed his Improved Phantasmagoria Lantern as a consumer version of the famous Phantasmagoria lantern shows that simulated ghost and spirit projections during the late 1700 and early 1800s. The name is a misnomer since Phantasmagoria refers to a type of projection rather than a type of lantern. The handle on the lantern was meant to accompany a larger professional magic lantern show with a small, mobile projector, or for small scale uses.

Carpenter & Westley

Lampascope Boule

The Lampascope Boule is a circular magic lantern projector with a hole at the base. This consumer lantern was meant to be placed on top of an oil lamp for home use. Lampascope projectors were elaborately painted with bright colours. This lantern is very faded but has remnant of red on the lens, and blue on the chimney.

Auguste Lapierre

Cinematograph

A hand-cranked 35 mm and small glass slide projector. This cinematograph was made after 1908 by the limited company Société Anonyme des Etablissements Demaria - Lapierre, when the two Lapierre brothers were obliged to amalgamate with the photographic manufacturer Jules Demaria. Cinematographs always had the ability to show loops, film strips from which the begin and end were glued together. For this purpose the upper reel was mounted above the apparatus on an extending bar. Longer films could also be showed but since there was not take-up reel the film would fall onto the floor or in a bag. The intermittent film transport was brought about by a rotating buckled rod that repeatedly struck the film down.

Auguste Lapierre