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Heritage Camera Collection United States
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Kodak "Petite" camera

Item is a compact folding camera with green and blue bellows. The Kodak Petite was a smaller, roll film camera specifically designed for and marketed to women. They came in several colours, and were also sold in gift sets that included a mirror and compact. Printed on the bottom of the two-part cardboard box is "Made in U.S.A. by Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., Trade Marks Reg. U.S. Pat. Office, Green."

Kodak Premo No. 9 combination case

Item consists of a black leather case with red velvet lining containing a Premo No. 9 Kodak folding camera, two wooden negative holders, and the camera manual. The camera used 5 x 5 or 5 x 7 plates or film packs.

Univex Mercury (Model CC)

Item is the first Mercury model camera created by the Universal Camera Corp. It takes 18 x 24 mm vertical exposures on Universal No. 200 film, a special 35 mm wide film. The camera has a Wollensak Tricor Anastigmat f3.5/35mm and a rotating focal-plane 1/20-1/1000 shutter.

Kodak Motormatic 35R4

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35R4. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The 35R4 model featured a built-in AG-1 Flashgun.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Retina I type 119

Item consists of a Kodak Retina I. It is a 35mm camera that accepts a daylight-loading cartridge. It is a black model 119. Missing part of lens casing.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Pony IV

Item consists of a Kodak Pony IV. It is a 35mm film camera with a rigidly mounted 44mm f/3.5 Kodak Anastar Lens and a four-speed Kodak Flash 250 Shutter. It originally sold for $40 USD. It is the only Pony model to feature an accessory shoe.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

Item consists of a Kodak 35 camera. It was the first 35mm film Kodak still camera produced in the United States. It was imported to Canada by the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited. It has a Kodak Kodex Shutter with three speeds (1/25 to 1.100 plus T and B), and a Kodak Anastigmat f:5.6, 50mm lens. It has a black body with rounded sides, a lens/shutter unit with two film advance wheels and a collapsible optical viewfinder. It was crafted out of Bakelite with metallic panels and inserts. It failed to do well in the marketplace due to high prices and strong competition, particularly from the Argus C series. It originally sold for $40 USD, the equivalent of approximately $600 today. This f/5.6 version of the Kodak 35 was replaced by one with flash synchronization after the war.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Motormatic 35F

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35F. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The 35F model featured a built-in AG-1 Flash gun.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Pony II

Item consists of a Kodak Pony II camera. It uses 35mm film, has a single speed shutter, and features a Kodak Anastar Lens 44m f/3.9. Rather than traditional f/stops, the lens is marked with exposure values.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Motormatic 35

Item consists of a Kodak Motormatic 35. It was the first of Kodak's automatic exposure cameras, and the last of their American-made 35mm cameras. It has a 44mm f/2.8 Kodak Ektanar Lens, a Kodak Automatic Flash shutter, and is a fixed-lens viewfinder camera that focused by scale or estimate. The Motormatic was part of the same series as the Kodak Automatic, but the Motormatics had a 4 speed user selectable shutter and a spring driven power film advance, as opposed to the Automatics, which had a 2 speed shutter and manual lever film advance. The Motormatic 35 has a Bakelite body with metal plates and inserts.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

Item consists of a Kodak 35 camera. It was the first 35mm film Kodak still camera produced in the United States. It has a Kodak Flash Diomatic Shutter with four speeds (1/25 to 1/150 sec, plus B and T), and a Kodak Anastigmat f:4.5, 51mm lens. It has a black body with rounded sides, a lens/shutter unit with two film advance wheels and a collapsible optical viewfinder. It was crafted out of Bakelite with metallic panels and inserts. It failed to do well in the marketplace due to high prices and strong competition, particularly from the Argus C series. It originally sold for $40 USD, the equivalent of approximately $600 today.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Retina IIIC

Item consists of a Kodak Retina IIIC. It is an early version of the last model of folding 35mm film cameras made by Kodak. It is a more rigid redesign of earlier models (the Ia and the IIa). It has a Retina-Xenon f:2.0/50mm Schneider-Kreuznach lens, and a Synchro Compur 1-1/500 MX shutter. It is in a hard brown leather case with green lining that also contains a manual for an All-Mite Flash Unit, a legend for all of the buttons and dials on the Retina IIIC, a lens, a viewfinder, and an undeveloped film canister.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Signet 35

Item consists of a Kodak Signet 35 camera. It has a 45mm f/3.5 Kodak Ektar Lens with rear helicoid focus. The body is sturdy cast aluminum alloy, and it features an automatic film stop counter. It has a Kodak Synchro 300 shutter with 5 speeds and uses 35mm film. It was the first of the Kodak Signet camera line.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak 35

The Kodak 35 was launched by Eastman Kodak Company in 1938 as their first 35 mm camera manufactured in the USA. It was developed and manufactured in Rochester, New York when it became apparent that the company could no longer rely on import from their Kodak AG factory in Germany during the troubled times prior to the Second World War. Originally sold for $40.00 USD.

Eastman Kodak Company

Argus C3 Matchmatic

Item is a 35mm point and shoot cameras. The Argus C3 Matchmatic camera is similar to the C2 but with different colored leatherette covering and different, propriety markings on the exposure settings. The lens is a 50mm f3.5 coated Cintar lens. The aperture range is f3.5 to f16 and the focus range is from 3 to 50 feet + infinity. Available shutter speeds are 1/10 to 1/300 plus B.

KODAK 35

Item is a 35mm camera with Kodak Anastigmant 50mm f3.5 lens with flash synchrozied shutter

Eastman Kodak Company

Ansco Memo

Item is a leather covered wooden box camera. The Ansco Memo is a single frame, fixed focus which takes landscape oriented images. Film is advanced by pushing down on a lever in the back of the camera. While not the first American camera made for 35mm film, it is the first to sell in abundant quantities.

Bosley B2

Item is a compact 35mm camera with coupled rangefinder and an Anastigmat F3.2/44 mm lens in a helical mount. It has a double exposure prevention mechanism.

Bolsey

Canon Canonet 28

Item is the rangefinder model of the Canonet 28. It has a CDS (cadmium sulphide) cell above the lens which is a Canon F2.8 40 mm. It has a Canonlite D flash attached to the hot shoe mount.

Argus C3

Item is a 35mm camera. Very solid and durable design, similar to the box camera.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

Univex Model A8

Item is a die-cast metal cine camera with a black finish. It has an interchangeable f5.6 Ilex Univar lens and a collapsible viewfinder. The camcorder uses Univex 30' patented spools of Single-8 film.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 25

Item is black leather covered metal body video camera with a Newton finder in the handle. The object uses a spring motor at 16 fps and has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm lens with a fixed focus f2.7.

National Graflex Series II

Item is a black single lens reflex camera for 2.25" x 2.5" exposures on 120 rollfilm. Camera uses a B&L Tessar f3.5/75 mm lens and a focal-plane shutter. The series II has cable release, mirror set lever at operator's left of hood and a sliding ruby window cover.

View-Master Personal Stereo Camera

Item is a black stereo camera for making your own View-Master slides. Film was wound twice through the camera with lenses raised/lowered for each pass. The camera make 69 stereo pairs of 12 x 13 mm exposures. It features a matched view-master anastigmat f3.5/25 mm coated lenses and has a 1/10-1/100 shutter.

Univex Model AF-4

Item is a subminiature vext-pocket folding camera for No. 00 rollfilm with an oxidized silver front plate and a Duo Achromatic lens. It originally sold for $1.95 which was less than it's predecessor's, the Univex Model AF-3, price of $2.50.

Micro 16

Item is an early model of the subminiature Micro 16 camera. It uses 16 mm film in special cassettes and a cartridge to cartridge fed. The camera uses a Achromatic doublet f8 lens and a single-speed shutter. The early model was produced from late 1946 to mid-1947 and uses an aperture selector level with a raised metal arrow with a checked background. The aperture selector switches between "Bright", "Dull", and "Color".

Expo Watch Camera

Item is a small novelty film camera that is disguised as a railroad pocket watch, first produced into early 1900's and sold until 1939. The exposure is made through the winding stem and the winding knob serves as a lens cap, and required special film cartridges. The camera is relatively common, as it was marketed for so long and several variations exist in the "Expo" trademark style, the winding knob, and the viewfinder shape. Black, red, blue enameled versions produced about 1935 are rarer.

DeVry QRS Model K-1

Item consists of a brick-shaped brown plastic camera. It creates 40 24 x 32 mm exposures on 35 mm film in special cassttes. The camera uses a Graf Anastigmat f7/7/40 mm lens with a single-speed shutter that trips by counterclockwise motion on the winding crank.

Premoette Junior

Item is a black leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The camera has no tracks on the bed but the front standard pulls out and clips into two slots at the front. The front slot is for taking photographs of objects that are 6 to 20 feet away and the back slot is for objects more than 20 feet away. The item uses a ball bearing lens.

Premoette Junior No. 1A

Item is a leather-covered aluminum-bodied folding-bed camera for filmpacks. The bed folds down but not to a full 90 degree angle. The bellows are black and there is no track on the bed but the front standard fits into two slots at the front, one for objects 6 to 20 feet away and the other for objects that are further than 20 feet away. The camera is still in the original packaging with the accompanying instruction manual. The camera uses a ball bearing lens.

No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak

Item is a metal folding camera with black bellows for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures. Camera uses a Pocket Automatic shutter and has win sprung struts for the lensboard.

No. 1 Readyset Royal

Item is a folding camera with brown bellows and covering, for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures on rollfilm.

No. 1A Pocket Kodak Junior

Item is a brown folding camera with black bellows; for 2.5" x 4.25" exposures on 116 film. The shutter was made by the Eastman Kodak Co. in the United States.

No. 1 Autographic Kodak Junior

Item is a folding camera with black bellows and brown leatherette covering and strap; for 2.25" x 3.25" exposures on No.A - 120 film. The camera was made by the Canadian Kodak Co. but the ball bearing lens was patented by the Eastman Kodak Co. in 1910 and 1913.

No. 2 Folding Brownie

Item is a horizontal folding camera with maroon bellow and a wooden lens standard. Photos were taken on 120 film for 2.25" x 3.25" exposure.

Kodak Six-20 Camera

Item is a folding camera with an enameled art-deco sides. The camera uses 620 film for 2.25" 3.25" exposures. The camera also has a fold down metal strut to support self-erecting front. The lens on the camera is a Kodak Anastigmat f6.3.

No. 2 Folding Pocket Brownie Camera

Item is a horizontal folding camera for 2.25" x 3.25" roll film with an "Autographic" feature. This camera uses metal lensboard instead of wooden.

Expo Watch Camera

Item is a small novelty film camera that is disguised as a railroad pocket watch, first produced into early 1900's and sold until 1939. The exposure is made through the winding stem and the winding knob serves as a lens cap, and required special film cartridges. The camera is relatively common, as it was marketed for so long and several variations exist in the "Expo" trademark style, the winding knob, and the viewfinder shape. Black, red, blue enameled versions produced about 1935 are rarer. Item has its original box and triangular viewfinder, but the lens cap is missing.

Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Kodak Brownie Starflex

Item is a pseudo twin lens reflex camera with flashgun attachment. It has a black plastic body with metal faceplate and fittings and was made for use with 127 rollfilm. It has a Dakon lens with a simpler folding finder, as well as an additional sports finder built into the base. Includes a Kodalite Midget Flasholder.

Kodak Stereo

Item is a stereo camera for creating two 24 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera has a built in sprit level to ensure that ideal stereo effect is achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for viewing images shot with the camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter.

Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two

Item consists of a Bell & Howell Two Fifty Two motion picture camera. It takes 8mm film, and has a Bell & Howell Super-Comat 10mm f/2.3 lens. There is a dial on the front of the camera to select aperture, light settings, and black & white or colour. It has a two-toned brown body and a winding knob on the side.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Kodak Disc 8000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap. In plastic display original packaging. Uses HR disc.

Kodak Disc camera (demonstration model)

Item consists of a demonstration verion of the Kodak Disc camera. Disc cameras were compact fixed-focus cameras with built-in flash that used 11x8mm film that came in the form of a flat disc. Camera body is made of clear plastic so the internal mechanics can be seen. Made in U.S.A.

Eastman Kodak Company

Kodak Disc 4000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. The camera used Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and, while the camera did well when it was first introduced, it lost populatiry due to the low quality prints it produced. Item includes a built in flash and wrist strap.

Kodak Tele disc

Item is a simple to use camera for use with the proprietary "Disc" film format. Kodak introduced the 15 exposure cartridges in 1982, while they were popular when first introduced, the small negatives 911 x 8 mm) often resulted in poor quality prints and the format soon lost its popularity.

No. 3A Autographic Kodak camera, Model C

Item is a folding camera with black leatherette case and leather bellows. Features a cord with metal push button shutter-release. Fitted with a Kodak Antistigmat lens f7.7 (170mm), No. 11592. Took Autographic film No. A-122. Serial no. 652261.

Bell & Howell Electric Eye

Item is a Bell & Howell Electric Eye 8mm motion-picture camera with a 3 lens turret. Bell & Howell was a U.S. based manufacturer of motion picture technology.

Cine-Kodak B

This is a 16mm movie camera that used 100 foot spools of film. The body is leather covered metal, rounded edges. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 25mm fixed-focus lens. Spring motor, brilliant reflex viewfinder. Working condition.

McKoewn pg. 1075

Cine Kodak K 100

Item is a range-finder, 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur, home use. The spring wound moter will shoot 40 feet of film before needing to be rewound.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera

Item consists of a Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Reflex Movie Camera. It was manufactured from 1961 to 1967. It is an 8mm camera with a P. Angenieux Paris f.6.5-52mm 1:1.8 Angenieux-Zoom lens with original lens cap. It used a clockwork motor and shot 25 feet rolls of 8mm film at 16 frames per second. Some paint is beginning to peel. When the camera was first released it cost approximately $139.95, about $900 today.

Keystone 16mm Film movie camera, model 7

Item consists of a 16mm motion picture camera, Model 7 made by Keystone Manufacturing Company in Boston Massachusetts in 1937. The company was an American manufacturer known for movie cameras with built-in electronic flash in the 1930s. The camera features a summer exposure guide on the front and has a Switar 1:1.8 f=16mm lens.

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Bell & Howell 240 Electric Eye camera outfit

Item consists of a Bell & Howell 240 motion picture camera. It is in a hard leather case also containing the manual and the case key. The camera uses 16mm film, has automatic exposure control, a 20mm lens, a self threading mechanism, has 32-fott film run and rapid winding crank, a reserve power indicator, and accepts a cable release.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Kodak Medallion 8

Item consists of a Kodak Medallion 8 movie camera - f/1.9. It ran at 16 fps and used Kodachrome 8mm film.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Kodak Instamatic M9

Item consists of a Kodak Instamatic M9 movie camera. It is an 8mm camera with an attached folding pistol grip. The body is brown and made of metal and plastic. It has a f/1.8 9.5-45mm Kodak Zoom Lens.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9

Item consists of a Kodak Cine Automatic Turret Camera f/1.9. It is a motion picture camera that uses double 8mm film and has a lens turret featuring a Kodak Normal Ektanar 13mm f/1.9 lens, a Kodak Wide Angle Ektanar 6.5mm f/1.9 lens, and a Kodak Telephoto Ektanar 24mm f/1.9 lens.

Kodak XL330

Item consists of a Kodak XL 330. It is a silent super 8 motion picture camera with a Kodak Ektar f/1.2 9mm lens and fixed focus. It has an adjustable eyepiece, a filming speed of 18 frames per second, a film counter, a battery check button and a tripod socket. It works with 4 AA batteries.

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Hawkeye 8 Movie Camera

Item is a hand-held motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 8mm film. Includes a 13mm f/2.:3 Kodak Ektanar Lens with aperture selector wheel.

Cine-Kodak Royal

Item is a hand-held metal and leather motion picture camera for filming motion pictures on 16mm film. Includes a 25mm f/2.3 Kodak Ektanon Lens and adjustable viewfinder.

Ciné-Kodak Model K

Item is a 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur use. IT has Camera has an anastigmat 25mm /f1.0 focusing lens with an aperture scale from f1.9 to 16. Camera has an aluminium alloy body and black leather covering. The Model K was an enlarged version of the Model BB to fit either 50- or 100-foot rolls. The camera has a spring driven motor with a winding crank, a tripod socket, exposure guide on the front of the camera, and a footage indicator.

Argoflex E

Item consists of an Argus Argoflex E twin-lens reflex camera made in the U.S.A. It was the first 620 film TLR camera produced by Argus. The camera features gear-coupled lenses allowing the user to focus using the viewfinder, an f4.5/75mm Argus Varex Anastigmat lens, and an Argus Varex Shutter with speeds T, B, 200, 100, 50, 25 and 10. Exposures are 6x6. The body is made of black Bakelite.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Auto Graflex

Item consists of a single lens reflex Auto Graflex camera for 3.25 x 4.25" plates or film sheets. It has a disappearing Bausch & Lomb 166mm f/4.5 lens, a collapsible viewing hood and a cloth curtain New Simplified Focal Plane Shutter with speeds up to 1/1000 sec. It was made by the Folmer & Schwing Division of the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York from 1907-1923. Two other models of the same camera were made and sold at the same time, one for 4x5" plates and one for 5x7" plates.

Kodak Stereo Camera

Item is a brown Kodak Stereo Camera for two 23 x 24 mm exposures on standard 35mm cartridge film. The camera had a built in sprit level to ensure ideal stereo effect was achieved. Kodak produced a corresponding Kodaslide Stereo Viewer and proprietary stereo slide holders for images shot with this camera. Lenses are Kodak Anaston F3.5/35mm with a Kodak Flash 200 shutter. The viewfinder is between the two lenses.

Nimslo 3D

Item is a four-lens, three-dimensional camera developed by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo and manufactured in the UK. The camera has a plastic body and 4 identical lenses, coupled with a shutter that exposes the four square images in synch. When exposed, 35mm film was sent to the Nimslo Co. in England and a few other specialty labs. The customer received developed, autostereo (lenticular) colour prints, which allow a true stereo image without the use of glasses. This process was also developed by Nims and Lo.

Stereo Realist 1042

Item is a stereo camera produced in the early 1950's when the format became widely popular with amateur photographers. The camera uses 35mm film, has 2 anastigmat lenses, 3.5/35mm with a shutter speed of 1-1/150. The camera has a flash synch on the top.

Fiarchild Aerial Camera

Item is a typical handheld camera using 5.7 inch roll film. The transport is by a built-in clockwork (one shot at a time) to be wound by a large lever at the left of the body to generate a flat film plane. Some suction is generated during exposure. Shutter is made by Ilex (Rochester NY) 1/125, 1/250, 1/500 sec.The lens is also by Ilex Optical Co - Paragon Anasigmat f6.3. Accessories include 1 38mm Yellow Filter and 2 Metal Slides.

Graflex speed graphic

Item was the official US press photographer's camera. It has a focal plane shutter as well as a front shutter. The lens is Wollensaku 135mm F/4.7 Raptar. The camera has a metal drop bed with two focus knobs. On top is a telescoping sports-finder. This model is a 4 x 5 format.

McKoewn pg. 369

Minute 16

Item consists of a 16mm subminiature camera designed to resmble a cine camera. It has a f6.3 meniscus lens and guillotine shutter with a speed of 1/60 seconds. The camera has an aperture scale from f6.3 to 16, a manually reset frame-counter, and a two-piece sports finder. There is also a tripod socket that doubles as flash synch-contact.

Kodak Disc 8000

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap. In plastic display original packaging. Uses HR disc.

Falcon Miniature

Item consists of a Falcon Miniature made in New York by Utility Manufacturing Company. It is a 127 film camera with a half frame viewfinder and a black Bakelite body. It has a Wollensak Minivar 50mm lens with fixed aperture and fixed focus, a one speed (1/25 +B) rotary shutter, a simple optical viewfinder and a spare film compartment.

Kodak disc 6100 camera outfit

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. This item includes the original packaging, with unopened twin pack of Disc film and strap.

Univex model A

Item is a small, Bakelite camera with a frame viewfinder. This was a proprietary camera design, which used No.00, 6 exposure film only made by the Universal Camera Corporation. Norton Camera filed a patent lawsuit filed against the Universal company after the product was released. Norton had been in talks with Universal to produce the camera originally. Universal eventually won the case and purchased the Norton Camera company. The camera originally sold for 39 cents.

Kodak Disc 3100

Item is a small, flat, hand-held camera with black plastic body and brushed metal, gold-coloured front plate. Intended by Kodak to replace their instamatic line of cameras, the Kodak Disc cameras were designed to be simple to use, with all automatic functions. Took Disc film, a proprietary format that made 15, 11 x 8 mm exposures; this small negative size made the resulting prints very grainy when enlarged and the camera model was not Kodak's most popular. Item has a built in flash and wrist strap.

Panoram Kodak No.4

Item is a rollfilm panoramic cameras in which the lens pivots and projects the image to the curved focal plane. The camera uses No. 103 rollfilm to take 3.50 x 12 inch exposures. It has a rapid rectilinear lens and a 142 degree angle. This model is the original model for the Panoram Kodak series and has no door to cover the swinging lens.

Detective camera

Item is a wooden, leather-covered Waterbury Improved Detective Camera. The design is a simple box format with film holders accessed through a door at the rear, and shutter assembly inside the front of box. On the inside of the plate holder door, a sticker reads "Caution, This film must be developed before Jan. 1st, 1900."

Kodak Duaflex III camera

Item is a mock twin lens reflex camera with Bakelite body and metal fittings, for use with 620 roll film. Designed to mimic the look of a twin lens camera, the topmost "lens" is in fact a brilliant viewfinder. Camera has a fixed focus Kodet lens.

Ansco Clipper

Item is an Ansco Clipper 4.5 x 6 xm rollfilm camera. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with a black body and expandable lens board.

Kodak Hawkeye Flashfun

Item is a plastic box style camera for use with 127 roll film film. It is a simple, fixed focus, point and shoot camera with beige and brown body and plastic lens. Includes a hot shoe for AG-1 flash bulbs.

Weno Hawk-Eye No. 7

Item is a Weno Hawk-Eye No. 7 box camera by the Blair Camera Division of the Eastman Kodak Company. The wood box is covered with seal grain morocco leather with brass and nickel trimmings. It has a fixed focus achromatic meniscus lens with rotary shutter and set of three stops, two tripod sockets and brilliant finders. The camera uses No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodak film to take 3.25 x 5.50 inch exposures.

No. 3B Quick Focus Kodak

Item is a box camera for 3.25 x 5.50 inch exposures on 125 mm film. It has a meniscus achromatic lens, a rotary shutter with three stops, two tripod sockets, and two brilliant finders. There is a focus lever on the side of the camera to set proper focal distance. After the focus is set, there is a button to press and the camera will open to proper distance focused and ready.

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