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Rochester, New York Item
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2 Darkroom lights

Item consists of two darkroom lights. Each has a wooden base holding a metal cylinder that surrounds a darkroom bulb. The power cord is thread through the wooden base to connect to the bulb. Only one still has a bulb. The inside of both metal cylinders has been painted white.

Image Arts

Analyst Super 8

Item is a motion picture camera with black plastic body. In original box (opened) with manual folded inside. Used Kodak Super 8 film cartridge and was powered by 4 AA batteries (removed). Comes with Kodak Zoom lens f1.9 (13-28mm). Large red bulb on front.

Eastman Kodak Company

Auto Graflex

Item consists of a single lens reflex Auto Graflex camera for 3.25 x 4.25" plates or film sheets. It has a disappearing Bausch & Lomb 166mm f/4.5 lens, a collapsible viewing hood and a cloth curtain New Simplified Focal Plane Shutter with speeds up to 1/1000 sec. It was made by the Folmer & Schwing Division of the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York from 1907-1923. Two other models of the same camera were made and sold at the same time, one for 4x5" plates and one for 5x7" plates.

Baby Brownie

Item is a basic, small-sized camera made of Bakelite and featuring a flip-up frame and viewfinder. A rotary shutter is operated by a lever under the miniscus lens. It made a picture size of 6 x 4 cm using 127 type film.

Eastman Kodak Company

Baby Brownie Special

Item is a small brownie eyelevel rollfilm camera with a black, moulded plastic body and a braided carrying strap. It is considered to be an upgrade from the Baby Brownie because of its direct optical viewfinder and easy-to-use shutter release. Originally sold for US $1.00, it used 127 film and had a meniscus lens and rotary shutter.

Eastman Kodak Company

Bantam RF

Item is a small rangefinder camera made for use with 828 special 35mm paper backed roll film. It has a brown Bakelite body with metal and aluminum accents. It is equipped with a non-self-cocking Flash 300 shutter and 50mm f/3.9 Kodak Ektanon lens. It has an optical viewfinder with superimposed coupled rangefinder and a 3 element lens that is mildly radioactive. Equipped with Kodak Ektanon Lens.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Bull's-Eye

Item is a small metal and black bakelite camera with Kodak Twindar Lens and settings indicated for scenes, groups or individuals. Made for use with Kodak 620 film, it features an eye-level viewfinder and a shutter release button on the front side, in front of the winding knob. It was also made in beige from 1958-1960.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Bull's-Eye Flash outfit

Item is a small metal and bakelite camera with Kodak Twindar Lens and settings indicated for scenes, groups or individuals. Used Kodak 620 film. Outfit includes a presentation box with flash holder, one-time use flash bulbs (4 of 8 have been used), user's guide, strap, and Kodacolor II negative film.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Bullet II

Item is a small point-and-shoot camera with a black plastic body and metal fittings. An upgraded model of the Brownie Starlet without flash facilities, this camera features a large eyelevel viewfinder, Dakon lens and rotary shutter. Wrist strap attached. Switch at bottom front indicates use with either colour or b&w 127 film.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Flash Six-20

Item is a flash synchronized version of the Kodak Six-20 Brownie Special. Originally the Kodak Six-20 Flash Brownie when introduced in 1940, it was renamed Brownie Flash Six-20 in 1946. It is an eyelevel rollfilm camera with a sheet metal body and black leather casing, made for use with 620 film. Includes large flashgun attachment still mounted to body.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Hawkeye flash model

Item is a small hand held box camera with Bakelite body, brilliant viewfinder and Kodalite Flash-holder attachment. For 6 x 6 cm exposures on 620 roll film. One of the best selling Brownie cameras ever made, it is a simple easy to use design created by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey. The original sales price was $5.50 for the camera alone and $7.00 for the flash model.

Brownie No. 2C Model A

Item consists of a Kodak No. 2-C Brownie Model A box camera. The camera used 130 roll film for an image size of 5.715 x 10.795 cm. It has a standard Meniscus achromatic lens and a rotary shutter.

Brownie Six-20

Item is a simple box camera with a black leatherette covered metal body, featuring an art deco design on the front panel. It took 8 2.25 x 3.25" exposures on 620 roll film. The lens features 2 focusing zones, "5 to 10 feet" and "beyond 10 feet" and uses a rotary shutter. Two brilliant viewfinders allow for portrait or landscape framing.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Starflash

Item is an eyelevel rollfilm camera with medium sized flash, built of a light blue Bakelite plastic body and metal fittings. Part of the Kodak Brownie Star series, the camera was also made in red, black and white, as well as in a special rwo-tone version with a Coca-Cola logo. It features a Dakon lens, rotary shutter, built-in flashgun, two aperture settings for color and black and white, and was made for use with 127 film.

Eastman Kodak Company

Brownie Twin 20

This camera has the unusual feature, for a non-folding camera, of both eye-level and waist-level viewfinders. The focussing lens has three aperture stops and both viewfinders shows brightline framing marks for 'Superslide' format. Flash facility is provided by the 'Pin & Screw' contacts on the left-hand side of the body, Kodak Supermite flasholder attached. Uses 620 rollfilm.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cameo Motor 110

Item is a small, horizontal camera with pop-up lens that covers viewfinder when closed. Black plastic body with rounded edges and an orange release button. Used 110 size colour cartridges, optimized for 200 film. Comes with packaging.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Combination Case, with Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Combination case. Included inside the leather case are the Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 motion picture camera, several lenses, lens hood, filters, incident light attachment, case key and camera manual. It is a clockwork-driven camera that could run at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It is fitted with an interchangeable lens.

Cine-Kodak Duo Splicer outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Duo Spicer Outfit complete with film cement, containers, an envelope of mounting screws and strips of practice film, and splicer. Missing applicators. For 8mm and 16mm movies, buth sound and silent.

Image Arts

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 20 motion picture camera. It was the first camera produced to use 8mm film. It is a simple, spool loading camera, powered by clockwork with a spring motor. It has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm, f3.5 fixed focus lens, a newton finder in the handle, and runs at 16fps. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 25

Item is black leather covered metal body video camera with a Newton finder in the handle. The object uses a spring motor at 16 fps and has a Kodak Anastigmat 13mm lens with a fixed focus f2.7.

Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Eight Model 60. One of the first movie cameras made by Kodak for 8mm film, it provided a cheap and portable option for home-movie makers compared to 16mm film.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 16

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 motion picture camera. It used 16mm film and was Kodak's first personal movie camera. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 25mm lens and can film at 16, 32 or 64 fps. It winds with a fold down crank. The body is metal covered with black leather.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Anastigmat f:1.9 13mm lens. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight.

Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera outfit case

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Magazine 8 Camera. It was introduced in the United States in 1946 and manufactured until 1955. It is a clockwork-driven camera capable of running at 16, 26, 32 and 64 frames per second. It has a Kodak Cine Ektanon Lens 13mm f/1.9. The lens is interchangeable and the wheel at the top of the camera is used to alter the viewfinder image according to the focal length. On the side is a universal guide for different types of daylight. It is in a hard brown case with filters, a second lens, a manual, purchase receipts and an adaptor ring.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B. It is the follow-up model to the Cine-Kodak, the first 16mm camera. As opposed to the Cine-Kodak, the motor Cine-Kodak Model B is spring-driven rather than hand-cranked, which allowed for it to be used without a tripod. It has an f/3.5 20mm lens and a Newton finder. It has a portrait attachment for close ups from 2 to 5 feet.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette.

Cine-Kodak Model B

Item is a Cine-Kodak Model B, the follow-up model of the Cine-Kodak which was the first 16mm camera. It has a cast aluminum body, hand crank and spring motor. The use of a tripod was required to allow varying speeds and single frames to be taken.

Eastman Kodak Company

Cine-Kodak Model B outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Model B 16mm motion picture camera. It was the follow-up to the Cine-Kodak, the world's first 16mm movie camera, featuring a spring motor. The body is an aluminum box covered in black leatherette. In hard case with manual , 2 lens adaptor rings, an exposure guide, and 4 mini Kodak film guides.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a hand-held movie camera produced by Kodak for amateur use. Two-speed shutter could shoot 8 and 16 fps. Anastigmatic lens 25mm f/1.9 - f/16.

Ciné Kodak Model BB

Item is a blue leather covered metal body motion picture camera for 16 mm film using 50' spools. It features a Newton finder and an interchangeable f1.9/25 mm Kodak Anastigmat lens. The camera uses a spring motor to capture 8,16 frames per second.

Ciné-Kodak Model K

Item is a 16 mm motion picture camera for amateur use. IT has Camera has an anastigmat 25mm /f1.0 focusing lens with an aperture scale from f1.9 to 16. Camera has an aluminium alloy body and black leather covering. The Model K was an enlarged version of the Model BB to fit either 50- or 100-foot rolls. The camera has a spring driven motor with a winding crank, a tripod socket, exposure guide on the front of the camera, and a footage indicator.

Daylight Kodak high speed ektachrome film

A high speed daylight colour film for slides produced by Kodak, in original, unopened packaging with instructions to process before January 1974. 8, 12, or 16 exposures at EH 120.

Eastman Kodak Company

Duaflex II

Item is a small, hand held camera in black plastic casing, oriented vertically with mirror reflector viewfinder with finder hood on top of camera. Kodak lens f8 (72mm). Used Kodak Verichrome Plus X films and produced a 6x6 picture. Pictograms on bottom help user to set the best shutter speed for certain weather conditions.

Eastman Kodak Company

Eastman Studio Scale

Item consists of an Eastman Studio Scale. It has a wooden base, a 6 piece weight set and a plaque that reads Avoirdupois Weight. It was used to facilitate the mixing of chemicals in a photographer's dark room.

Image Arts

Eastman's Squeegee album

"Photographs" is embossed in black ink on the tan clothe-bound album cover. There are 50 spaces for photographs on the 26 pages, and the 38 extant images are of people at work and play in rural and urban areas. A sticker on the last, empty page reads “Eastman’s Squeegee Album, for 3 ½ x 3 ½ pictures, style A, manufactured by Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY.”

Eastman Kodak Company

Film instruction leaflets

Leaflets produced to accompany the purchase of a new roll of film, giving instructions for use and price list for other film products manufactured by the various companies.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Film labels

3 papers with torn edges, probably attached to a large format plate holder for film and detached when the film was used. The films were Comet Plates, Portrait Panchromatic for Kodachrome Dry Plates and Autographic Cartridges, all by Eastman Kodak Co.

Eastman Kodak Company

Graflex RB Series D

The Graflex RB is a single-lens reflex camera, the last of the family of field cameras known as "Graflex cameras", in contrast to the "Graphic" Graflex cameras. This model was produced between 1928-1947. It features a rotating back (abbreviated to RB), 4" x 5" plate holder, a light-excluding focusing-hood, interchangeable film holders, extensible lens with hood, and a f/4.5 anastigmat lens with a focal length of 7-1/2 inches (190mm), and is is designed to be held at waist height for use. The Graflex was used in the USA Navy and favoured for its ability to capture outdoor and action scenes. The aperture and tension can be adjusted according to the shutter speed plate, a table mounted on the side of the camera indicating adjustments. The Graflex RB series D is composed of straight-grain Honduras mahogany covered with black Morocco leather and chrome details.

This camera is accompanied by a carrying case of wood, black leather, and green felt. It contains one camera instruction manual: "Instruction manual for Graflex Cameras: RB Super D & RB Series B: Also Earlier Models including Series B, RB Series D, Auto, RB Auto, Auto Jr., RB Tele & RB Jr." It also contains 7 film holders and one replacement rotating back. The back piece is inscribed with: "Graflex Cute film Magazine: Pat Sept 7, 1920 Other Patents Pending: Made in U.S.A. by Folmer Graflex Corporation Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A., 43. For use of this alternate back, the camera back must be removed and rotated.

Graflex speed graphic

Item was the official US press photographer's camera. It has a focal plane shutter as well as a front shutter. The lens is Wollensaku 135mm F/4.7 Raptar. The camera has a metal drop bed with two focus knobs. On top is a telescoping sports-finder. This model is a 4 x 5 format.

McKoewn pg. 369

Hawkeye Instamatic II

Small snapshot camera with black and tan plastic body (mottled in places to look like leatherette) similar to the Instamatic 44. Large winding mechanism on top left for film advance, and a flashcube attachment on the top right. Made for use with 126 cartridge film, this camera featured an f/11 meniscus lens and a 1/50 sec. shutter.

Eastman Kodak Company

Hawkeye Pocket Instamatic

Item is a small snapshot camera with narrow and horizontal body design. It has an orange coloured release button on top and is built of black and tan plastic (the tan colour mottled to look like leatherette). Made for use with 110 film, this camera resembles the Kodak Pocket Instamatic 110 in its f/11 25mm Meniscus lens, 2 speed shutter, Magicube facility and use of 110 cartridge film.

Eastman Kodak Company

Instamatic 104

Item is a small hand held camera with metal and black leatherette casing. Strap attached. Used 126 cartridge film and AAA batteries. Similar to the Instamatic 100 but utilising flashcubes rather than individual bulbs.

Eastman Kodak Company

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